DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   Painting dry basement walls: Drylok or latex? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/painting-dry-basement-walls-drylok-latex-101377/)

Ironlight 04-13-2011 09:41 AM

Painting dry basement walls: Drylok or latex?
 
I am going to be painting the bare basement walls of a 1925 craftsman style house that we just bought. They are a a combination of cement, terracotta block, and cinderblock and appear to be uniformly free of any current moisture issues. It's been a wet month prior to today and the walls are *apparently* dry and clean.

Part of me thinks that just to be sure I should paint all the walls with Drylok. However, that will not only be expensive but also time consuming. I'll be painting the ceiling joists with a sprayer and it sure would be a lot easier to just do the walls at the same time.

So, would it be wiser to Drylok the whole thing, or am I safe with regular latex? I have never painted basement concrete with anything other than Drylok so I really have no clue.

Thanks in advance :)

Limewash 04-15-2011 10:18 AM

Any good quality latex should be ok.

Gymschu 04-15-2011 07:51 PM

I vote for Drylok for this reason........you will have waterproofed those walls against any future moisture migration. It's dry now and that's great, but, what if? And, once you put latex paint on, you CAN'T drylock over top. Why not give yourself some security and drylock now. It's really not that expensive.

chrisn 04-16-2011 03:09 AM

I would agree with gymschu:thumbsup:

jsheridan 04-16-2011 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gymschu (Post 630200)
I vote for Drylok for this reason........you will have waterproofed those walls against any future moisture migration. It's dry now and that's great, but, what if? And, once you put latex paint on, you CAN'T drylock over top. Why not give yourself some security and drylock now. It's really not that expensive.

I agree. What is now may not be in the future. Though some houses, because of the lay of the surrounding land will probably never have worry, which may be your case. Drylock is only effective on unpainted masonary. Also, just because you don't have water on the floor doesn't mean that zero moisture is wicking through the walls. Take some one ft plastic squares and tape them tightly to the walls, sealing them. Let them be for a couple of days. If there's any moisture transfer, you'll have condensation.

Ironlight 04-16-2011 07:17 AM

OK that seals it (pun intended). I did not know Drylok would not work over latex. Drylok it is.

While I don't plan on ever finishing the basement, I am going to be working down there quite a bit. It's relatively massive and has three built-in rooms off the main part and is going to house my general workshop, bike workshop, wine cellar/cigar humidor, and fishing man-cave. I'll Drylok it now and get it over and done with.

Thanks for the input guys.

chrisn 04-16-2011 05:25 PM

It has been many, many years since I have used it and it was clear or white. Just curious does it now come tintable?

Ironlight 04-16-2011 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 630773)
It has been many, many years since I have used it and it was clear or white. Just curious does it now come tintable?

Yes it is.

user1007 04-16-2011 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gymschu (Post 630200)
I vote for Drylok for this reason........you will have waterproofed those walls against any future moisture migration. It's dry now and that's great, but, what if? And, once you put latex paint on, you CAN'T drylock over top. Why not give yourself some security and drylock now. It's really not that expensive.

Basement walls are basement walls. You are on the right track but I hope you understand you cannot waterproof a basement, on either side, with surface finishes?

Faron79 04-16-2011 09:37 PM

Yep...

It HAS to be Drylok on the bare walls.
The 1st GALLON probably won't make it 100sf!!
...AND it HAS to be brushed-in, to work it into the micro-pores.

(read that point again...)

2nd coat can be rolled.
It HAS to be 2 coats.

Yes, it can be tinted to light colors.

Now you're decently waterproofed for a time!

As someone here stated...check the landscaping too!!!
* Make sure soil added to foundation is tamped firmly, and slopes away from foundation for 4' or more...
* Make DAMN sure all downspouts go out at LEAST that far.

Faron


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved