Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-26-2011, 07:14 AM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


Hi KCK, sorry to hear of your struggles. I know how frustrating this stuff can be. I think you have a couple of issues going on here. Firstly, your brush. China bristle is not for latex, so I'm not surprised that you got lousy results, and a ruined brush when you went to wash it out. Secondly, I don't think you should have opted to spray. I'll second Chrisn's sentiment. Any inexperienced HO/DIY can stumble through and achieve an acceptable spray result. But that requires that all the planets line up accordingly, which rarely occurs. It's the experience acquired through years of application that enables overcoming challenges when they don't line up. We can send you on a goose chase for a 1.8 tip for your gun, but what if there isn't one, or it's not the tip that is causing the problem? What if it's not a furniture grade gun? Go to any pro painting forum and you'll hear experienced guys asking questions about issues they're having with spraying, even simple projects. And when I hear Husky from HD, I think of the tool box I bought that fell apart in the back of the truck, before I even put tools in it. Or the ratchet driver I bought that only ratcheted for about three days. There will be those who say, there goes Jsheridan again, pooh poohing someone's plan. I say have at it. Part of giving sound advice is helping people understand and accept their limitations and managing their expectations. I've painted countless pieces of furniture, both for pay and personal, and I've never sprayed one of them. Even built-in cabinetry, which is a furniture grade project. I've never had anyone question its look. But I know what products to use and how to apply them. The first piece of advice you got, from Brushjockey, was right on. I generally prefer oil for furniture, which if far easier to use and much more forgiving. Todays acrylic paints are very finicky and can be difficult to use with minimal brushing experience. Put an end to your misery. Apparently, SW is more concerned with selling you what they want you to have rather than what you want, so, go to Ben Moore, get yourself a quart of Satin Impervo oil, a small mohair roller cover, and a decent 1.5 inch synthetic brush (better than today's china bristles imo). Give the piece a good sanding with 150 grit paper, clean the dust off and apply two coats, with a real fine (220) sanding between. Thin the paint a bit with some thinner. You should be able to roll practically the entire piece with just a bit of cut in. You'll have a nice uniform finish that should level out nicely. Good luck with it.
Joe

jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2011, 07:43 AM   #17
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,832
Rewards Points: 2,172
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
Hi KCK, sorry to hear of your struggles. I know how frustrating this stuff can be. I think you have a couple of issues going on here. Firstly, your brush. China bristle is not for latex, so I'm not surprised that you got lousy results, and a ruined brush when you went to wash it out. Secondly, I don't think you should have opted to spray. I'll second Chrisn's sentiment. Any inexperienced HO/DIY can stumble through and achieve an acceptable spray result. But that requires that all the planets line up accordingly, which rarely occurs. It's the experience acquired through years of application that enables overcoming challenges when they don't line up. We can send you on a goose chase for a 1.8 tip for your gun, but what if there isn't one, or it's not the tip that is causing the problem? What if it's not a furniture grade gun? Go to any pro painting forum and you'll hear experienced guys asking questions about issues they're having with spraying, even simple projects. And when I hear Husky from HD, I think of the tool box I bought that fell apart in the back of the truck, before I even put tools in it. Or the ratchet driver I bought that only ratcheted for about three days. There will be those who say, there goes Jsheridan again, pooh poohing someone's plan. I say have at it. Part of giving sound advice is helping people understand and accept their limitations and managing their expectations. I've painted countless pieces of furniture, both for pay and personal, and I've never sprayed one of them. Even built-in cabinetry, which is a furniture grade project. I've never had anyone question its look. But I know what products to use and how to apply them. The first piece of advice you got, from Brushjockey, was right on. I generally prefer oil for furniture, which if far easier to use and much more forgiving. Todays acrylic paints are very finicky and can be difficult to use with minimal brushing experience. Put an end to your misery. Apparently, SW is more concerned with selling you what they want you to have rather than what you want, so, go to Ben Moore, get yourself a quart of Satin Impervo oil, a small mohair roller cover, and a decent 1.5 inch synthetic brush (better than today's china bristles imo). Give the piece a good sanding with 150 grit paper, clean the dust off and apply two coats, with a real fine (220) sanding between. Thin the paint a bit with some thinner. You should be able to roll practically the entire piece with just a bit of cut in. You'll have a nice uniform finish that should level out nicely. Good luck with it.
Joe
This is just what I would have said, if I could write like Joe.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2011, 08:27 AM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


Thanks Chris. Maybe so, but it was what you wrote that inspired to respond. Had you not input, I may have just clicked through. Takes the whole team to move a ball downfield. High five!
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2011, 09:42 AM   #19
KCK
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


I sincerely appreciate your reply. (All of em) I feel like I knew what the problems were - just unsure how to proceed without feeling like I was going to be wasting more time & money. The whole project I felt pretty confident (since my original post on here anyway) until SW really pushed me into the acrylic latex environment. I knew it was wrong because of what I was told on here and I just felt uneasy since then. Kickin myself for buyin it!

Just sippin' morning coffee and will go over this with hubby and send him up to the store...lol I am sick of going.

Thanks again!!
KCK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2011, 01:53 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


Quote:
Originally Posted by KCK View Post
I sincerely appreciate your reply. (All of em) I feel like I knew what the problems were - just unsure how to proceed without feeling like I was going to be wasting more time & money. The whole project I felt pretty confident (since my original post on here anyway) until SW really pushed me into the acrylic latex environment. I knew it was wrong because of what I was told on here and I just felt uneasy since then. Kickin myself for buyin it!

Just sippin' morning coffee and will go over this with hubby and send him up to the store...lol I am sick of going.

Thanks again!!
I don't think it was wrong to use the latex. I have a piece sitting next to me with black satin SW All Surface latex enamel, did it the same time I did a bookcase for a customer. I use both, but prefer oil. I recommended you use the oil because it will mimic a spray finish better. Oil takes longer to dry, so therefore has longer to level. You don't have to worry about blocking, things sticking to it. I think it just has a nicer finish, IMO. And, it's easier to use, IMO, than some of the new waterborne finishes. You might want to try using the paint you have now, just don't spray. Use the same technique recommended for the oil. Keep us posted.
Joe
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2011, 05:16 PM   #21
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,832
Rewards Points: 2,172
Default

Painting Dresser (MDF/Particle Board/Laminate) Help!


He is right, it is not the paint. I have used waterborne plenty and it is a fine product for this. It is not the easiest to work with and as Joe has pointed out, oil would most likely be the best(easiest) choice.

chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
diy, dresser, mdf, nursery, paint


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
painting exterior door JP79ST Painting 18 05-18-2010 05:04 AM
painting a dresser for a bathroom cindyb861 Painting 12 02-02-2009 07:19 PM
Interior door painting and too much/too little paint richbl Painting 2 08-26-2008 04:07 PM
Painting over a sponge painted wall Snowdog Painting 3 03-17-2008 12:13 AM
couple questions about painting on different surfaces joeyboy Painting 3 08-19-2007 03:33 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.