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kt82 06-18-2012 09:52 AM

painting composition shingles
 
I want to paint my 20 year old fiberglass composition 3- tab shingles
Any idea's. I know when i don't want to paint them the paint sticks like glue

ric knows paint 06-18-2012 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kt82 (Post 946072)
I want to paint my 20 year old fiberglass composition 3- tab shingles
Any idea's. I know when i don't want to paint them the paint sticks like glue

Hiya kt...

While it's not an ideal surface to paint, Acrylic latex house paints, roof coatings and elastomerics will work fine on composition roofs...Make sure the surface is clean - avoid painting in direct sunlight, if possible - and don't use any stir-in bonding agents for this type of app. Also remember, this is not a permanent solution - it should be primarily considered an aesthetic application, and it really won't serve as functional repair to the roof.

kt82 06-19-2012 10:53 AM

I tried a small side yesterday and it looks pretty cheezy. Thanks

kt82 06-19-2012 12:06 PM

Ric it is close to 100* with 20 MPH wind in Texas ,I am painting exterior columns, SW pro Classic Enamel SG . the
paint seems to dry on the brush. Is the liberal use of Latex Extender detrimental to the the enamel finish?

ric knows paint 06-19-2012 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kt82 (Post 946960)
Ric it is close to 100* with 20 MPH wind in Texas ,I am painting exterior columns, SW pro Classic Enamel SG . the
paint seems to dry on the brush. Is the liberal use of Latex Extender detrimental to the the enamel finish?

Not the most ideal atmospheric conditions for painting outside, but my guess is it's not gonna cool down anytime soon, eh? There really is nothing in latex extenders that'll hurt your paint if you use it "liberally"...Personally though, I don't think I'd want to extend it beyond 10-15% - beyond that, and in those kind of temps, you may create some kinda funky drying/curing/coalescence issues. Also, if rain, or high humidity is in the forecast, leaching problems may occur.

I should've mentioned earlier re: painting roof shingles that brushing may produce cheezy results...heavy nap roller cover would be better...spray app even better.

kt82 06-19-2012 05:56 PM

headed for the 100* soon
I will adjust my body to working from 6 AM to noon

thanks again

hotrod351 06-20-2012 08:00 AM

100 +, im jealous. her it starts out at 100 and by 10:00 am it 110 finishing off at around noon at 116. elastomeric is the only thing id use, four coats. will hold up forever and never blow off.

Paintguy 06-20-2012 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ric knows paint (Post 947198)
Not the most ideal atmospheric conditions for painting outside, but my guess is it's not gonna cool down anytime soon, eh? There really is nothing in latex extenders that'll hurt your paint if you use it "liberally"...Personally though, I don't think I'd want to extend it beyond 10-15% - beyond that, and in those kind of temps, you may create some kinda funky drying/curing/coalescence issues. Also, if rain, or high humidity is in the forecast, leaching problems may occur.

I should've mentioned earlier re: painting roof shingles that brushing may produce cheezy results...heavy nap roller cover would be better...spray app even better.

Actually the liberal use of extenders/water does hurt the film since they are lowering the volume solids. What is means is that with each coat, you are putting less on the substrate. On interior coatings, even minor amounts of these products can dramatically decrease dry surface performance (scrubs, burnish resistance, color rub off). The old adage holds true, you do not get something (open time) for nothing. If it were that easy, the manufacturer would simply put it in the paint.

All that said, it's a moot point for a roof - like Ric said, it's going to fail no matter what you do.

ric knows paint 06-20-2012 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paintguy (Post 947595)
Actually the liberal use of extenders/water does hurt the film since they are lowering the volume solids. What is means is that with each coat, you are putting less on the substrate. On interior coatings, even minor amounts of these products can dramatically decrease dry surface performance (scrubs, burnish resistance, color rub off). The old adage holds true, you do not get something (open time) for nothing. If it were that easy, the manufacturer would simply put it in the paint.

All that said, it's a moot point for a roof - like Ric said, it's going to fail no matter what you do.

Whenever I make comments such as "There really is nothing in latex extenders that'll hurt your paint if you use it "liberally"..." , I do so with the assumption that everyone knows what is going on in my mind at the time I say it...I'm also one to borrow and paraphrase old adages (as it relates to paint), my favorite is "For every advantage there is an equal and opposite disadvantage". So, you're right - kinda. The result of adding a latex extenders to latex paint might result in some of the issues you've listed - just as they might experience issues I alluded to in my post. I make those comments based on a compositional perspective - the make-up of latex extenders are components already found in the coatings they are attempting to extend - they are (as they relate to the coatings) inert and innocuous and will have no detrimental effect to the resin of the coating...

...and, from a manufacturer's perspective, products are formulated to perform in a wide range of applications and exposures. It'd be literally (and economically) impossible for a manufacturer to create the perfect recipe for a product to be used in each type of application, for every type of exposure, to endure each atmospheric influence...Therefore, various additives and extenders are sometimes necessary AND many times endorsed (albeit unenthusiastically) by the paint manufacturer.

Finally, I never said "it's going to fail no matter what you do" - I said it's not an ideal situation...Roofing shingle can be painted successfully with surprisingly good, long lasting results. The caveat to the person painting the roof is when using standard house paint variety products, is this is not a fix to roof in need of repair - it is simply aesthetics (although there are some "paint" type products that can do temporary structural repair to a roof).

I appreciate your comments, and we're really not that far apart in our philosophies.


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