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PirateKatz 11-17-2008 04:04 PM

Painting a bathroom
 
Hi,

We live in a 100 year old house and are looking for some advice regarding painting a bathroom. The bathroom was remodeled in the 60's and is drywall over plaster. It's never been painted and has always been wallpapered.

We removed the wallpaper using a friend's steamer and a scraper. The paper came completely off but there are places that have a rough texture from (I think) residual adhesive.

What is the best method for removing this? You can't see it but when you rub your fingers across it, these patches feel like course sandpaper.

What kind of paint/primer is recommended for bathrooms? This room doesn't have an exhaust fan, so steam tends to build up.

We've repainted virtually every room in the house and learned the hard way that the paint from Sherwin Williams is much easier to work with than what we bought at Lowes/Home Depot (though, we we've been very happy with Zinsser primer from Lowes). If I had to guess, I would imagine you'd have to be careful with primer/paint selection for bathrooms.

I appreciate any advice from the pros!

Thanks

bradnailer 11-17-2008 04:56 PM

I'd put a skim coat of drywall compound over the rough places then lightly sand them.

If you have steam build up, you really should consider installing an exhaust fan.

It never hurts to use a qood quality primer before painting.

slickshift 11-17-2008 09:27 PM

You could either use a random orbital palm sander and/or seal the adhesive with an alkyd (oil) primer or Zinsser's Gardz
If there's still unwanted texture at that point, you can skim some joint compound over the rough spots, sand smooth, and re-prime (an acrylic would be fine at this point, or any leftover alkyd or Gardz would be fine also

sirwired 11-17-2008 10:59 PM

Yes, as slick said, Gardz is the way to go here. The Zinsser website will tell you where you can buy it. (I haven't seen it at Big Box.) Sherwin makes a Kitchen & Bath paint that you should use here; it has added mildewcides that you will definitely need.

Is there any way you can install a fan in here? It will go a long way towards retarding the growth of mildew and mold.

PirateKatz 11-18-2008 09:02 AM

Thanks for the advice!

Regarding an exhaust fan... It's definitely on our to do list but at this point, we're still trying to get a feel for how difficult/expensive of a project it may be.

The bathroom is on the second floor and does have a centrally located light fixture in the ceiling, as well as lights built into the cabinet along the wall. So, it seems like it would be easy to get power to a new exhaust fan. It seems like it would be convenient to have a light/fan combo unit and control it both by a single (existing) switch. There's also a subpanel in the attic, as well as a electrical runs criss-crossing the attic for the bedrooms.

Our attic is unfinished but does have tongue-and-groove flooring, so a section would have to be removed to access the bathroom ceiling. Presumably, we could then run flexible duct work to the attic soffit.

All of these tasks *seem* to be within my level of ability but from experience, something unforeseen always crops up...

Nestor_Kelebay 11-18-2008 07:52 PM

For the final topcoat of paint, I would use two coats of Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom Paint, which you should be able to get at Home Depot or your local home center.

Any paint made specifically for bathrooms will use a resin that is highly water resistant so the paint won't crack and peel due to the high humidity in the bathroom. Also, bathroom paints will have dry powder mildewcides added to them that are highly soluble in water. That mildewcide will actually move toward the surface of the paint film when it gets wet. The mildewcide will kill any mildew spores that land on the paint before they can grow, thereby keeping your bathroom paint free of mildew.

Don't cheap out on the paint you use in your bathroom because it's common for ordinary paints to crack and peel in bathrooms simply because of the high humidity. Most people mistake this for poor prep work prior to painting, but it's most commonly due to people using a paint not intended for high humidity in their bathrooms.

PirateKatz 11-19-2008 07:49 AM

I went to Sherwin Williams last night to buy paint for our living room and asked the clerk about what he recommends for bathrooms. He said they didn't have anything specially for bathrooms and recommended some kind of paint that supposedly can be put directly on drywall w/out primer.

sirwired 11-19-2008 11:41 AM

Gee, you might want to try a different Sherwin store...

http://www.sherwin-williams.com/pdf/...t_intpaint.pdf

SirWired

Nestor_Kelebay 11-20-2008 01:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PirateKatz (Post 187167)
I went to Sherwin Williams last night to buy paint for our living room and asked the clerk about what he recommends for bathrooms. He said they didn't have anything specially for bathrooms and recommended some kind of paint that supposedly can be put directly on drywall w/out primer.

He may have been talking about Zinsser's PermaWhite Bathroom Paint, which can be used as it's own primer.

(Still, my feeling is that it's better to use a primer to prime, and a paint made for bathrooms as the top coat. And, since bathroom paints rely on their reserve of mildewcide to remain free of mildew, it's better to put on 2 coats (or even 3) to provide a large reservoir of mildewcide so that your bathroom remains mildew free for a very long time.

Zinsser's guarantees their Bathroom Paints to be free of mildew for 5 years, but my personal experience with them is that if you start seeing mildew on your bathroom walls after only 5 years, you got a defective can of paint. Realistically, 15 to 20 years would be expected. But, if I were Zinsser's, that's the strategy I'd adopt too. If you expect it to last 20 years, then guarantee it to last 5.

chrisn 11-20-2008 06:27 AM

Realistically, 15 to 20 years would be expected.

Not trying to be a smart a**, but who has 20 year old paint still on the walls? That would put the last paint job at 1988.:whistling2:

bradnailer 11-20-2008 10:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 187604)
Realistically, 15 to 20 years would be expected.

Not trying to be a smart a**, but who has 20 year old paint still on the walls? That would put the last paint job at 1988.:whistling2:

Paint warranties mean nothing around our house. My wife usually changes colors about every three years. Fortunately for me, she's the painter.

Nestor_Kelebay 11-20-2008 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 187604)
Realistically, 15 to 20 years would be expected.

Not trying to be a smart a**, but who has 20 year old paint still on the walls? That would put the last paint job at 1988.:whistling2:

Lotsa people. The elderly, for example. A divorced woman with kids that's already too busy with work and driving the kids all over the place. I think if you took a survey, you'd find that lots of people don't repaint the interior of their homes more often than once every 20 years.

Seriously.

chrisn 11-20-2008 07:09 PM

Seriously.

I'll take your word for it but I have benn painting peoples homes(interior) for a little over 20 years and I do see old walls but not so much.


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