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Old 09-30-2012, 11:16 AM   #1
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Painting a bathroom


Is there a particular paint type that is recommened for bathrooms and other surfaces that will be exposed to steam regularly?

The current paint in my bathroom 'weeps' after long showers.
Im not sure if this is from just being a paint type used that shouldnt be in a bathroom, or if its just a that a low-quality paint was used.

Anyway, bathroom is scheduled for remodelling, and Id perfer to choose a paint that doesnt have the same issues

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Old 09-30-2012, 12:01 PM   #2
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Painting a bathroom


Phantasm, I have never really used any special "bathroom" paint although most paint mfr. make a bathroom paint maybe more for marketing purposes than anything else. Most high quality paints (other than flat) will hold up to the moisture in a bathroom. More than anything else, make sure you have adequate ventilation in your bathroom. The vent keeps the air moving in your bathroom and keeps that moisture from running down the walls for long periods of time. In your case, to be on the safe side I would indeed purchase a bathroom paint because it does contain more mildewcides, etc. to inhibit the growth of mildew on your wet bathroom walls.

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Old 09-30-2012, 01:16 PM   #3
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Painting a bathroom


yeah
Ive never had any moisture problems or mildew issues, its just more that the paint seems to be leeching out oil or something when it gets wet.
Its something I have never seen before, and I was just curious if the 'wrong' paint was used, but at this point I am more suspecting that it was just a very low quality paint
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Old 09-30-2012, 01:57 PM   #4
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Painting a bathroom


The moisture is from, guess what, to much moisture in the room. It needs to go! If there is no exhaust fan, get one installed asap.
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Old 09-30-2012, 04:17 PM   #5
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Painting a bathroom


Phantasm, you now have another can of worms on your hands.........finding out what is leaching through the paint film. If you can figure out what it is you will have to let the walls dry for a couple days, do some scuff sanding, and apply an OIL-BASED or maybe even a SHELLAC-BASED primer to seal out the stains. Let that dry for a few days and then topcoat with your bathroom paint.
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Old 10-01-2012, 05:57 AM   #6
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Painting a bathroom


When you say it weeps after long showers, does this go away when it dries? Acrylic will turn cloudy if subjected to long periods of moisture but it will then clarify again as it dries. You see this a lot in acrylic varnish type products.

If the weeping is causing a permanent discoloration, then something is leaching up through the paint or algae or mildew is growing down into it.

It does sound like planning for better ventilation should be in the bathroom reno plan? If long showers are a norm you may want to beef up the exhaust unit one would normally put in the space. You might want to increase the amount of tile or marble as well or augment it with some cedar, redwood or other sauna type interior wood that is better equipped than paint to take in large amounts of steam.

I used a specialized bath paint once when I client insisted. It was a Benjamin Moore product but really nothing more than their semi-gloss with a mildew reduction agent added. Any painter can do that for you but I am guessing this is not your problem.

Hate to even bring up the concept, but I live in a State rapidly running out of fresh water. Shorter showers might be an idea to think about? Unless you are a really dirty and grimy person of course.

Last edited by user1007; 10-01-2012 at 06:04 AM.
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Old 10-01-2012, 03:06 PM   #7
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Painting a bathroom


Since your going to redo anyway if the present exhaust fan (if there is one) is located in the center of the room like most of them are, consider moving it over the shower area, otherwise it's no more than a fart fan. just make sure it's for this wet area.

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