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-   -   Painting Aluminum Siding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/painting-aluminum-siding-146950/)

kelly1215 06-13-2012 04:55 PM

Painting Aluminum Siding
 
We are planning on painting the aluminum siding on our house. It has never been painted before, what is on it is what came on it from the factory. On the sides of the house that get the hot sun the paint is chipping off. We have power washed already. On the sides where the paint was chipping off a lot more came off with the power washing. ALOT! On the other sides we couldn't get the paint to chip off. We plan on washing with TSP as our next step. We are looking into paints. Dutchboy Duraweather Maxbond is claiming that you only have to wash with the TSP and not use a primer first. I am having no luck finding reviews on this paint. Does anyone know anything about this paint or used it on aluminum siding without applying a primer first? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

Gymschu 06-13-2012 05:24 PM

Kelly, do a search on here and you will find dozens of threads about painting aluminum siding.

If you have pressure washed already and got most of the dirt/chalkiness off, you don't need to do any further cleaning. To me, cleaning with the TSP adds another variable into the painting equation that could potentially cause you problems down the road. I am surprised to hear that paint is chipping off. Usually the factory finish is on there pretty good and eventually it chalks off. I've never seen it actually chip off. If you have paint that is peeling off, you may now have to use a sander to get any more flaking paint off. You really don't have to prime aluminum. Use 2 coats of a quality paint like SW's SuperPaint. DO NOT USE DUTCH BOY. Even though SW owns Dutch Boy the quality is just not there. Superpaint in Satin finish........apply 2 coats......DONE!

joecaption 06-13-2012 05:30 PM

I agree on the Super paint but disagree on the sheen. Semigloss would be a much easyer finish to keep clean.
The flater a paints finish the harder it is to keep clean.

kelly1215 06-13-2012 06:04 PM

--Pictures--
 
3 Attachment(s)
The first picture is the worst side. We have not power washed or cleaned this side yet. This is reason we are having to paint. The second pic is where we have power washed. The third pic is a side that does not get much sun but still chipped off with power washing. The bad sides are down to bare metal. I have searched and everyone talks about chalking, this is much more that chalking. Do you think we still don't need to prime before painting?
Thanks!

Gymschu 06-13-2012 09:54 PM

Kelly, that siding has become pitted and is now flaking off. You may have to use an orbital sander or a sheet sander with fairly coarse grit (60 or 80) to try and remove that and get down to a sound surface. Again, you don't have to prime. Aluminum doesn't have the same qualities as steel........it does not oxidize and produce rust. I guess if it gives you some peace of mind you could apply a metal primer before painting, but, I've done aluminum for 34 years WITHOUT priming and have had virtually ZERO problems with adhesion. Joe suggests a semi-gloss and that's an ok choice.........it just exaggerates any imperfections on the surface such as dings and dents from hail, etc.........satin hides those a little bit. Anyway, you're well on your way to making that house look great.

kelly1215 06-13-2012 10:16 PM

I can't believe we just figured this out!!!
 
Upon further examination we have discovered that the siding is not aluminum but steel and the trim and soffets are aluminum. The siding is not Pitted but has a wood grain texture. Does this change anything that you have recommended? thank you so much for your help. I have not been impresses with any help I have gotten in Paint stores. Thanks.

Gymschu 06-14-2012 07:21 AM

Steel, if it has not rusted anywhere, can be treated the same as aluminum..........2 coats of SuperPaint. Yes, it will be trickier to get down into the wood grain groves with a sander, but, with patience, it can be done. Did a home like yours about 8 years ago and after a recent pressure wash, it looks as good as the day it was put on.

Kelly, maybe to be on the safe side, after a thorough sanding and cleaning, apply a rusty metal primer to all bare spots. They make rusty metal primer in red and gray.........I would use the gray so it will be easier to cover with your finish coats. This will give you peace of mind that rust spots won't flash through your finish coats. Good luck. You will be amazed at how nice your home will look.

dogris 06-14-2012 02:28 PM

Locally, I've never run into steel siding. It doesn't appear to be rusted where the paint is chipping in the photos. Can I assume the siding is hot-dipped galvanized.
If so, it may be a mistake to apply any oil based coatings, including primers.

pucks101 06-15-2012 09:26 PM

I think this job is screaming for primer. That surface is looking rough, and you're investing a lot of time and effort into washing, scraping, sanding, and painting. Why not just go all the way and prime it? I think I would do the whole thing with something like Zinsser 1-2-3 (instead of the spot metal primer), and you may even need a little less sanding. This primer is good on aluminum, iron, and steel, and is a rust inhibitor. Plus, there is a $4/gal rebate through July 15. One more thing, I agree the post suggesting satin (or low lustre in some brands/lines). I think if you use semi-gloss over your entire house you may find it to be really bright and shiny, and will definitely show every imperfection.

jsheridan 06-16-2012 12:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pucks101 (Post 944299)
I think this job is screaming for primer. That surface is looking rough, and you're investing a lot of time and effort into washing, scraping, sanding, and painting. Why not just go all the way and prime it? I think I would do the whole thing with something like Zinsser 1-2-3 (instead of the spot metal primer), and you may even need a little less sanding. This primer is good on aluminum, iron, and steel, and is a rust inhibitor. Plus, there is a $4/gal rebate through July 15. One more thing, I agree the post suggesting satin (or low lustre in some brands/lines). I think if you use semi-gloss over your entire house you may find it to be really bright and shiny, and will definitely show every imperfection.

That's an understatement, you might need sunglasses to look at it on a sunny day. Airplanes will be falling from the sky, ships crashing into shore, and martians seeing it akin to a lighthouse.
It'll be easily identifiable, "I live in the shiny house" . . . Ohhhh, okay.
Semi is a trim enamel. For field work like that a satin is about the most you want. That's even a bit much for my taste.
Definitely a 911 there.

dogris 06-16-2012 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pucks101 (Post 944299)
I think I would do the whole thing with something like Zinsser 1-2-3 (instead of the spot metal primer), and you may even need a little less sanding. This primer is good on aluminum, iron, and steel, and is a rust inhibitor.

I would never rely on 1-2-3 as a rust inhibitor on bare iron or steel for exterior exposure.

Matthewt1970 06-16-2012 09:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dogris (Post 944551)
I would never rely on 1-2-3 as a rust inhibitor on bare iron or steel for exterior exposure.

I would never rely on 1-2-3 for anything other than drywall.

pucks101 06-16-2012 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dogris (Post 944551)
I would never rely on 1-2-3 as a rust inhibitor on bare iron or steel for exterior exposure.

I didn't think there was any rust on this job currently, just flaking paint. I also didn't think OP was going to working with a completely bare substrate, just a partially scraped and sanded, previously painted surface. So I would consider the finished primed and painted surface to be safe from rust. I suggested 1-2-3 vs. NO primer due to ease of use and cost, and just noted that it additionally will provide some protection from rust.
So maybe poorly worded due to trying to give a short reply, but I'll clarify that if rust is an issue, and/or if there is a real concern about future rust, I will recommend Coronado's Rust Scat Acrylic Primer.

As for the next post who only uses it on drywall, your prerogative I suppose, but I've had lots of success with it over the years on all kinds of surfaces. I like it as an inexpensive all-purpose (interior & exterior) primer.

tmast 07-16-2012 07:13 PM

resolution?
 
What did you decide on? Did you prime? We have the exact same siding and situation. Paint stores are not helpful. I'm leaning towards priming the bare areas with zinser 123 or Ben Moore Super Spec HP acyrlic primer and then a latex exterior top coat.

AlbertoMalave 07-19-2012 08:36 AM

Aluminum priming is also done with electroplating i.e an advantage of electrolysis.It will definitely overcome your problem.

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