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dcwarner 08-13-2011 12:14 AM

paint on walls not drying even
 
I primed my walls with Valspar high hiding primer tinted same shade as finish coat. after applying the finish coat, the primer came through in places, so I bought a second gallon of pain and re rolled the walls, but did not cut in. now you can see everywhere i re-rolled and where i did not, so I started to do the cutting in... and it is not drying the same...... HELP.

jsheridan 08-13-2011 12:37 AM

Stop. What finish type are you using, flat, eggshell, etc? What color is it? What is the difference that you're seeing, is it sheen difference, color difference, or texture diff? My opinion is you never cut after rolling. Some guys do, but I don't subscribe, for a couple of reasons. You may have stumbled upon one of them. I have rolled a second coat without a second cut before and got away with it, but I don't recommend that either. Shoot back with the answers to the questions. For right now, just stop, because you're probably going to do a full recoat with cut.

Gymschu 08-13-2011 09:33 AM

Listen to JSheridan, he will guide you through this. My first thought is you're not putting enough paint on the walls. Load that puppy (roller cover) up. It should almost be dripping wet when you pull it out of the paint tray. Don't be shy! Valspar paint could also be contributing to the problem. It's decent paint, but not up to the standard of a Sherwin=Williams or Benjamin Moore.

m1951mm 08-13-2011 05:26 PM

Paint tray, whats a paint tray???????????????:laughing:

dimples, small clumps in paint?

This could happen for a number of reasons. Sometimes in the can of paint stuff starts to get clumpy and in this case get yourself a paint strainer and strain the paint into a new bucket. Your walls could have stuff on them, wipe the walls down with a DAMP sponge. Your roller cover is shedding, buy a GOOD cover and wash it first to remove leftover lint. If you are working out of a paint tray, paint will start to dry and as you reload your roller you are picking up some of that dried paint on the roller. You will almost never see a professional working from a paint tray. It allows to much air to get to a small amount of paint casusing it to dry. Work out of a five gallon bucket with a screen (a metal grid that hangs off the top of the bucket towards the paint. (A bouns with working with the screen you have a place to hang your roller if you need a smoke, potty or Miller break.)

Keeping a wet edge on the wall is as important as keeping your tools wet. If I take a break I always wrap my brush in plastic, make sure the roller is good and soaked in paint (but not to the point that I submurge the whole thing into the bucket so as to get tons of paint seeping between the cover and the carraige which will cause drips and roller lines) and throw a clean drop over the bucket. Keeping air from the paint is very important until it is on the wall:thumbup:.

Just added this from another post thought it might help

chrisn 08-13-2011 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by m1951mm (Post 706530)
Paint tray, whats a paint tray???????????????:laughing:

dimples, small clumps in paint?

This could happen for a number of reasons. Sometimes in the can of paint stuff starts to get clumpy and in this case get yourself a paint strainer and strain the paint into a new bucket. Your walls could have stuff on them, wipe the walls down with a DAMP sponge. Your roller cover is shedding, buy a GOOD cover and wash it first to remove leftover lint. If you are working out of a paint tray, paint will start to dry and as you reload your roller you are picking up some of that dried paint on the roller. You will almost never see a professional working from a paint tray.:huh: It allows to much air to get to a small amount of paint casusing it to dry. Work out of a five gallon bucket with a screen (a metal grid that hangs off the top of the bucket towards the paint. (A bouns with working with the screen you have a place to hang your roller if you need a smoke, potty or Miller break.)

Keeping a wet edge on the wall is as important as keeping your tools wet. If I take a break I always wrap my brush in plastic, make sure the roller is good and soaked in paint (but not to the point that I submurge the whole thing into the bucket so as to get tons of paint seeping between the cover and the carraige which will cause drips and roller lines) and throw a clean drop over the bucket. Keeping air from the paint is very important until it is on the wall:thumbup:.

Just added this from another post thought it might help


I do. I find the 5 solution to be just the opposite as you said. I am always picking crap off the walls from the bucket screen . But thats just me.

m1951mm 08-13-2011 05:44 PM

Looks like another thread to me. Dont you get tired of filling the tray and not getting the dried stuff from the tray in your roller??

Who is going to start it, you or me Chris??

jsheridan 08-13-2011 06:08 PM

You will almost never see a professional working from a paint tray.:huh:

OOhhhh, like a shiv in the kidney! The only time, and it's been a long time, that I work from a five is exterior or if I'm painting a warehouse size place. They get way too messy. I think a thread hijacking is in process here, call 911, for that and the profuse bleeding from my side:laughing:

DannyT 08-13-2011 07:43 PM

my uncle used valspar paint with primer from lowes to repaint a house he bought. when he went back for paint to do the third coat the woman said we should have told you that you need to prime first. he spent over 900.00 on that stuff. i tried to tell him what to buy but he didnt call me til after he had bought the paint. also listen to Gymschu and load the roller up and dont roll the roller dry before you reload it. after you get the paint on the surface go back and back roll it lightly to even out the paint and you wont get the visable lines from the roller.

chrisn 08-14-2011 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 706571)
You will almost never see a professional working from a paint tray.:huh:

OOhhhh, like a shiv in the kidney! The only time, and it's been a long time, that I work from a five is exterior or if I'm painting a warehouse size place. They get way too messy. I think a thread hijacking is in process here, call 911, for that and the profuse bleeding from my side:laughing:


Yes! I am NOT alone:thumbup:

jsheridan 08-14-2011 06:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 706824)
Yes! I am NOT alone:thumbup:

No my friend, you are not. In fact, as with textured walls, I think that rolling from fives is another regional phenomenon. Other than my father, another pan hater who uses a 2.5, I really haven't seen anyone else use them, let alone routinely. I don't think they sell the extra large pans in the hinterlands, because I don't have a problem with continually having to fill the pan. Viva Le Pan!:thumbup:

m1951mm 08-14-2011 08:17 AM

Reasons I like to work from a 5 gallon bucket. Easier to move around the room with it (one handed job). Easy to cover during breaks without getting paint all over whatever is used to keep the air from it. Can leave the roller in the bucket overnight if need be without crushing the nap (not submurged mind you, drop the sceen to the bottom hang the roller on the backside of the screen and put the lid back on the the roller handle coming up from the hole in the lid that colorant is added and surround that with plastic) and be ready to roll first thing the next day without having to reload the cover. Can load 2 gallons in it at a time, less filling. I get less crap in my paint due to edges drying. You all will get a kick out of this one. I can take it up my ladder with me and do a horizontal roll near the ceiling line so as to keep a similar texture top to bottom (me and my lambskin covers). I am not strong enough to work an 18" roller all day. Buckets are easier to cleanout, not any of those stupid ridges that make it harder to clean.

I have painted from Denver, Albuquerque, Wash D.C. area and am now in Ohio:mad: and in all those places a 5 is the norm. I have seen the big roller trays and always thought that they were there only for doing floor finishes.

Chris, Joe, I thought someone was going to start a new thread????? and I did not want to be the one. I would like to see more from you pros out there for your reasonings for using the vehicle of choice. I feel I am a good painter, but I also want to learn and be better.

Brushjockey 08-14-2011 09:09 AM

best of both worlds



Shur-Line Paint Pail & Tray, #12300

http://www.rsci.com/assets/shurline-12300.jpg
http://www.rsci.com/assets/shurline%20logo.gif
Shur-Line’s has an amazingly efficient design that accommodates all your painting needs, yet weighs less than three pounds and fits on a ladder. It has a roller frame rest and built-in roller grid, a built-in brush well, an easy-to-carry handle, and enough room for a full gallon of paint (5 times the capacity of flat trays!). It is sink-sized for easy cleanup, yet won’t tip or spill during use.


I also use this with a 14" open end roller setup



http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pro...f6dffb_300.jpg


21-3/4 in. Plastic Deep-Well Tank Tray

Description:
The 21-3/4 in. Plastic Deep-Well Tank Tray features a reinforced ramp and footing area to help provide stability. This plastic tray is flexible and durable. The tray can be used with standard 18 in. roller covers.

Gymschu 08-14-2011 09:38 AM

The problem with 5-gallon buckets is the ANGLE that you have to dip your roller into.........you sorta have to lift and dip.......I'd rather just dip it and be done. A jumbo roller tray holds lots of paint and can be covered by a large garbage bag during breaks. Just another man's way of doing it........I have no prejudice against the 5-gallon bucket approach.

jsheridan 08-14-2011 10:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by m1951mm (Post 706857)
Reasons I like to work from a 5 gallon bucket. Easier to move around the room with it (one handed job). Granted, they are slightly easier to move around. However, I mostly slide a pan with my foot. And, they're easier to topple. You can't put a roller with pole in straight up when not in use, or it will topple.
Easy to cover during breaks without getting paint all over whatever is used to keep the air from it. I just wrap a piece of painter's plastic. If I want to leave the pan filled over night, which I rarely do, I just press the plastic onto the paint surface.
Can leave the roller in the bucket overnight if need be without crushing the nap (not submurged mind you, drop the sceen to the bottom hang the roller on the backside of the screen and put the lid back on the the roller handle coming up from the hole in the lid that colorant is added and surround that with plastic) and be ready to roll first thing the next day without having to reload the cover. I always slip the cover off the cage and wrap it in plastic.

Can load 2 gallons in it at a time, less filling. I rarely have a use for any container to hold two gallons of paint at any one time on most interiors, as said, unless warehouse sized jobs.
I get less crap in my paint due to edges drying. I find the stuff that globs on the sides of a five are more troublesome than anything that happens in the pan. Especially with a bulky lambswool which is bound to clean the sides of a five.
You all will get a kick out of this one. I can take it up my ladder with me and do a horizontal roll near the ceiling line so as to keep a similar texture top to bottom (me and my lambskin covers). With a rolling pole, raise and lower the handle from the ladder to the ground. The ground man uses the pole to hand it up, the ladder man takes it from the pole to use and reattaches to the pole to refill.
I am not strong enough to work an 18" roller all day. Start lifting weights:laughing:
Buckets are easier to cleanout, not any of those stupid ridges that make it harder to clean. I only wipe pans, I don't clean them. As with cleaning covers, it's a waste of time. Number of minutes to clean a pan times the hundreds of times it's performed equal hundreds of minutes divided by 60 equals numbers of hours equals hundreds of dollars, to do what, clean an eight dollar pan. :no: Besides, a clean pan can give the type of trouble you imagine with pans. I throw them away when they get to weighing about six pounds, or the roller doesn't fit anymore.

I have painted from Denver, Albuquerque, Wash D.C. area and am now in Ohio:mad: and in all those places a 5 is the norm. I have seen the big roller trays and always thought that they were there only for doing floor finishes, and ceilings and walls. Actually, floors would be done with an 18" out of a floor pan. I believe 18's on walls stemmed from floor use.
Chris, Joe, I thought someone was going to start a new thread????? and I did not want to be the one. I would like to see more from you pros out there for your reasonings for using the vehicle of choice. I feel I am a good painter, but I also want to learn and be better.

I have always told guys who have worked under me that I only care about two things as to the way they perform assigned tasks, results and appropriate time spent. There are a few tools and process that are banned however. If they can achieve the results I expect in the time I calculate it to be done, I really don't care what tools or processes they employ. You can paint baseboard laying down with a pillow and a pencil brush as long as the two targets are met for all I care. If not then we talk. The point is that, among all the competitive banter, if it works for you on those two points, whatever the value of them, that's all that matters. There's a wrench to fit every nut.

chrisn 08-14-2011 05:53 PM

What he said,:thumbup1: with exception to cleaning covers:whistling2:. We DO agree on the pans:laughing:


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