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Old 08-27-2007, 08:28 AM   #1
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Hello,
I'm looking for simply THE BEST interior trim/door paint. My house is about 20 years old, with stained wood trim and interior doors. We want to paint it all white. I will be sanding, cleaning, and taping off the trim this week, with the hopes of painting a few rooms worth this weekend.

What is the best trim paint I can buy? I have more money than time (not trying to be pompous, as I don't have all that much of either), but I mean to say that I want to do two coats MAX (one prime, one paint), and not waste my time with coat after coat of inferior paint. I'm not sure if latex or oil is better, either. Any opinions? Any tips or tricks I should know about?

We love the look of white trim so I really think this will transform our house - I just want to make sure I do it right the first time.
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Old 08-27-2007, 10:59 AM   #2
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Anytime I go from stained wood to painted wood I always prime with a good oil based primer and top coat with two coats not one. I use Ben Moore paints for almost everthing with no call backs. Just tell them what your doing and ask for high end paint.
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Old 08-27-2007, 11:13 AM   #3
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Thanks Daryl. I've never used an oil-based primer. What brand/type do you suggest? And does Ben Moore make an oil-based paint? I guess I've never used anything but latex. Do you have to use oil-based paint over an oil-based primer?

Also, I should have asked this before, but is there any specific brand or type of brush I should use for this?
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Old 08-27-2007, 12:03 PM   #4
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


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Originally Posted by Proulx06 View Post
Also, I should have asked this before, but is there any specific brand or type of brush I should use for this?
80% of our brushes are Purdy's. I like white China bristle for oil and polyester/nylon for latex.
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Old 08-27-2007, 01:08 PM   #5
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Good advice from above/ Beni Moore is the pros choice. Go to a local dealer.

They will advise pro's and cons oil vs latex per your application.

also two top coats is right. You will waste a lot of time trying to get the first and only coat right.

They might even tint your primer.
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Old 08-27-2007, 02:49 PM   #6
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


I primarily use purdy's as well. Oil primer is also what i would use, i have always been partial to original kilz myself. You can use an oil primer and still use waterborne finish. Usually 1 coat of primer and 2 coats of the finish is the way to go. As far as brush size and style goes it will depend how much trim, what kind of trim, and how many doors, crown, ect.. For a diyer i would suggest a Purdy 3" XL glide, or a 2-1/2" XL Glide
Many on here will suggest using BM paint, myself i prefer ICI dulux, or ICI durus interior/ exterior.
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Last edited by Workaholic; 08-27-2007 at 02:53 PM.
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Old 08-27-2007, 03:43 PM   #7
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Quote:
Originally Posted by Proulx06 View Post
I'm looking for simply THE BEST interior trim/door paint.
The best at what?...lol
Seriously...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Proulx06 View Post
What is the best trim paint I can buy? I have more money than time (not trying to be pompous, as I don't have all that much of either), but I mean to say that I want to do two coats MAX (one prime, one paint), and not waste my time with coat after coat of inferior paint. I'm not sure if latex or oil is better, either. Any opinions? Any tips or tricks I should know about?
OK, well that's something
The best paint that money can buy doesn't fit the rest of your needs
Lol
It uses two coats primer and three top-coats!

...Everything is a trade-off, compromise, etc...

I can tell you regardless of some claims by product marketing departments, you will not find a 'one-coat wonder' that covers, protects, and looks good with one top coat
It does not exist
Trust me, if it did, we painters would be all over that

So even the best paint money can buy, will not guaranty coverage, sheen, and protection with one coat...plan on two topcoats

So, that being said...

The next best stuff would be a premium quality oil-based enamel
I lean towards BM's Impervo, but Sherwin Williams has a good quality one also, as I'm sure some others do

Oil-based enamels have a slight edge over waterborne enamels in durability
And I do mean slight
The bennies of a waterborne are it's easier to use (more forgiving and quicker), and easier to clean up (saving more time and making less hazardous waste)

*notice I am saying "waterborne", not latex...it's a marketing term but there IS a difference in quality*

Now, I can use whatever on my own house, including that $149 a gallon stuff
I've got plenty, and get discounts, etc...

But on my days off, when I have to paint my interior trim, I use BM Impervo waterborne enamel



Quote:
Originally Posted by Proulx06 View Post
My house is about 20 years old, with stained wood trim and interior doors. We want to paint it all white. I will be sanding, cleaning, and taping off the trim this week, with the hopes of painting a few rooms worth this weekend.
You'll need a coat of oil-based (alkyd) primer
If using Ben Moore, use the Fresh Start (alkyd...it comes latex too so get the right one), if using SWP, get theirs
Or the Zinsser's Cover Stain (oil/alkyd) is great too
I can recommend that

The waterborne, or oil-based enamels will go right over it
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Old 08-27-2007, 09:46 PM   #8
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


have to use oil base... one prime, two top coats minimum.

i have used both BM and SW. Probably lean toward SW
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Old 08-27-2007, 11:07 PM   #9
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Quote:
Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
The best at what?...lol
Seriously...



OK, well that's something
The best paint that money can buy doesn't fit the rest of your needs
Lol
It uses two coats primer and three top-coats!

...Everything is a trade-off, compromise, etc...

I can tell you regardless of some claims by product marketing departments, you will not find a 'one-coat wonder' that covers, protects, and looks good with one top coat
It does not exist
Trust me, if it did, we painters would be all over that

So even the best paint money can buy, will not guaranty coverage, sheen, and protection with one coat...plan on two topcoats

So, that being said...

The next best stuff would be a premium quality oil-based enamel
I lean towards BM's Impervo, but Sherwin Williams has a good quality one also, as I'm sure some others do

Oil-based enamels have a slight edge over waterborne enamels in durability
And I do mean slight
The bennies of a waterborne are it's easier to use (more forgiving and quicker), and easier to clean up (saving more time and making less hazardous waste)

*notice I am saying "waterborne", not latex...it's a marketing term but there IS a difference in quality*

Now, I can use whatever on my own house, including that $149 a gallon stuff
I've got plenty, and get discounts, etc...

But on my days off, when I have to paint my interior trim, I use BM Impervo waterborne enamel





You'll need a coat of oil-based (alkyd) primer
If using Ben Moore, use the Fresh Start (alkyd...it comes latex too so get the right one), if using SWP, get theirs
Or the Zinsser's Cover Stain (oil/alkyd) is great too
I can recommend that

The waterborne, or oil-based enamels will go right over it
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Old 08-28-2007, 09:07 AM   #10
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


BTW, if you go with Sherwin, the product you are looking for is ProClassic enamel. (Comes in both oil and waterbourne) And just like BM's Impervo, it's gonna take two finish coats on top of an oil-base primer.

That said, you won't need a third finish coat.

NOTE: As I said in the post on bookshelves, the Waterbourne acrylic enamels are a bit different from ordinary paint, so practice on some scrap first. And don't "re-brush". If you missed a spot, or it looks thin somewhere, wait for everything to dry and hit it on the next coat.

When I was using ProClassic, it looked like complete junk wet; but once it dried, my job looked like I actually knew what I was doing... (okay, a couple of drips, but no DIY job is going to be perfect on the first go)

SirWired
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Old 08-28-2007, 01:40 PM   #11
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


i did my kitchen cabinets in pro-classic... did one coat primer, two coats pro-classic...light sanding in between.

they look like they were sprayed. i brushed.

oh... it was oil.... you can't get that look with water paint.

i did them in satin. oil satin looks very similar to water semi-gloss.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sirwired View Post
BTW, if you go with Sherwin, the product you are looking for is ProClassic enamel. (Comes in both oil and waterbourne) And just like BM's Impervo, it's gonna take two finish coats on top of an oil-base primer.

That said, you won't need a third finish coat.

NOTE: As I said in the post on bookshelves, the Waterbourne acrylic enamels are a bit different from ordinary paint, so practice on some scrap first. And don't "re-brush". If you missed a spot, or it looks thin somewhere, wait for everything to dry and hit it on the next coat.

When I was using ProClassic, it looked like complete junk wet; but once it dried, my job looked like I actually knew what I was doing... (okay, a couple of drips, but no DIY job is going to be perfect on the first go)

SirWired
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Old 04-09-2008, 08:18 PM   #12
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Which paint to use? Painting wood trim white


Hi, I like to start by filling any holes or niks with wood filler, then sand. For primer I use Kwal's oil base primer (Cancel) is the name. After sanding and dusting (the trick to making white wood beautiful is making sure theres no dirt or dust in your paint). After fully dry lightly sand again and caulk every little crack and imperfection you see. Caulk should be dry in an hour or so, then you can apply your final coat of paint, my paint of choice is Pro Classic by Sherwin Williams, watch the runs though. It will tend to run in the corners after it begins drying. If this happens take a wet brush (water) and smooth over your run . Do not over brush the Pro Classic, keep it wet. A more user friendly paint would be Manor hall by Pittsburg. For the door, take all of your hardwere off it'll make it much easier for you, use a "weeny roller" to apply your primer and paint.

Last edited by tinamarie; 04-09-2008 at 08:21 PM.
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