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Old 09-02-2011, 02:10 PM   #1
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


Hi. I'm a newbie to using a paint spray gun. I got a siphon type sprayer to use with an air compressor. The siphon is from the small jar on the sprayer, not a hose to a bucket. My first attempt was to spray primer on some metal radiator covers. The paint seemed to go on fairly well, but the room I was in filled up with so much mist that it looked like it might rain. The room was about 11x20 and it was filled with this mist which I assume was overspray. Fortunately the room was gutted for remodeling, so no harm done, but should I be making this much mist? The directions on the sprayer say to set the pressure at 40-60, so I set it at 40.

Also, the compressor cycles after only 20 seconds of spraying and it isn't a small compressor. It's a DeWalt twin tank, I think it is like 4.6cfm or such. Any suggestions besides getting a respirator (which I already did)?

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Old 09-02-2011, 02:11 PM   #2
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


First- what are you painting, and why did you decide to spray it?

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Old 09-02-2011, 02:26 PM   #3
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Painting metal baseboard radiator covers using Rustoleum primer. Wanted to spray them to have a nice even coat and no brush marks. But my main questions are - should a sprayer make that much overspray and use that much compressed air, or am I doing something wrong?
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Old 09-02-2011, 02:28 PM   #4
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


No it shouldn't, but a conventional will make some overspray.
There are both fluid and air adjustments on gun. Plus the viscosity of the paint. The trick is to balance the tree till it works how you want it to.
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Old 09-02-2011, 02:54 PM   #5
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


You are going to have overspray and mist with a paint spray gun, even an HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure) spray gun will make an unventilated room unbearable even with the best respirator because the amount of paint in the air will make clear vision impossible.

Brushjockey's advice to get the correct paint viscosity is also key.

You should ventilate the room in some way to exhaust the paint fumes and overspray to an unoccupied outdoor area. It's a good idea to use a filter on the exhaust air as well.

Also, please use a respirator that is rated for the types of fumes that you will be producing even if you are using water-based paint.
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Old 09-02-2011, 02:59 PM   #6
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


fab, that's what it was - unbearable. To finish the paint coats I'll be taking them outside to the barn where I can leave the door open. I guess being new to this I just didn't expect that much overspray.
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Old 09-02-2011, 03:52 PM   #7
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A lot of the things I spray are for industrial use and the smoothness of the finish is of secondary concern so I don't spend a whole lot of time prepping the surface except to remove all oils, surface film from welding operations and dust. When I spay items that need a beautiful finish, such as radiator covers, I spend almost as much time preparing the surface as I spent building the item.

I know that it's hard for a homeowner to make a paint booth that compares to a professional booth, but anything you can do to reduce dust in the area will help. Using cheap furnace filters on the entering and leaving air is one way to help ensure a good finish and also prevent overspray from getting on anything near the painting operation, such as a car finish (total nightmare, especially if it's a neighbor's car). A dust particle may look small, but it's size is magnified greatly when covered by a mil or two of paint.

I cannot stress enough the importance of proper PPE when undertaking a spray painting project.
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Old 09-02-2011, 04:04 PM   #8
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


All that is why I don't recommend a DIY spray. Is very possible to get a real nice finish with a brush with a lot less setup.
But everything has technique.
I have been painting for a long time, and particularly in occupied houses I almost never spray.
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Old 09-02-2011, 05:20 PM   #9
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


I think Brushjockey and I are pretty much on the same page here. It's a pretty steep learning curve to get a good finish with a gun, especially on a metal surface. I am just assuming your radiator covers are metal since you are using a rustoleum brand primer?

One suggestion I have is to call local body shops, or even stop by in person, and ask if they would let you rent their spray booth. You would probably have the best luck with small independent shops. Get to know somebody in the shop who does a lot of painting. You may even be able to get a few tips on mixing your paint and setting the gun up properly, plus you would have good ventilation and dust control. Here's a hint: a lot of pro auto body painters have their own homemade spray booths at home to do do their own projects.

Besides proper mixing of the paints and primers there are certain additives that will substantially improve both the look and longevity of the finish. If you are using alkyd enamel based paint one of these additives is known as "fish-eye preventive" and there are also hardeners that can make the finish much more durable.
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Old 09-02-2011, 06:22 PM   #10
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Hey Fudge,

Your compressor is recycling so often because you have the pressure but you don’t have the volume. If you had a 20 or 30 gallon tank your compressor wouldn’t recycle as often, however would stay running longer to fill the larger tank. One of the drawbacks with using a conventional spray system over an airless unit is the over spray. Try reducing your air pressure until it begins to spit, then raise it up just a little. If your air pressure is too high then you’ll have excessive over spray. You might also want to put an 18"fan in a window or door and turn it on high with another window or door open at the opposite end of the room to create air flow. Turn the fan on about 10 minutes before you begin spraying to start the flow and leave it on for 20 minutes after your done. Over spray can cause a rough surface if not ventilated.
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Old 09-06-2011, 11:02 AM   #11
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Paint Sprayer Gone Wild


Good tips everyone! Spraygunn, hehe, I did the fan trick and ended up with a nice primed circle on my window screen. I'm moving my painting operation to the garage where overspray won't hurt anything.

fab & Brush, I will play with my pressure and other settings. It's not essential this job be perfect, I guess this is just a new toy for me to play with. Maybe I will get better with practice. Thanks everyone!

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