Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-20-2008, 09:10 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Share |
Question

Paint and resin coat countertop


I have painted an old formica countertop and then coated it with Resin. It came out beautifully but...needs a little more resin in spots. Does anyone know if I need to wait for the resin to cure completely (72 hours) before putting on another coast or can I do it now? It has been about 24 hours since the first coat.

elliott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 05:11 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,264
Default

Paint and resin coat countertop


Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
I have painted an old formica countertop and then coated it with Resin. It came out beautifully but...needs a little more resin in spots. Does anyone know if I need to wait for the resin to cure completely (72 hours) before putting on another coast or can I do it now? It has been about 24 hours since the first coat.
Can you tell me about the paint you used to paint it with? Is it oil based, latex, epoxy, fingerpaint, what?

Also, the word "resin" has a different meaning that you seem to be using it in. Do you mean you coated the paint with "Rosin"? Can you provide more information on exactly what this "resin" stuff is?

Thanks.

Nestor_Kelebay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 06:08 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Default

Paint and resin coat countertop


Thanks nestor,
I used a spray paint by Rustoleum called Stone accents, it is acrylic.
The resin is a product by Parks called Super Glaze. It is like Polyeurathane but it is an epoxy resin mix. It is used for sealing bar counters or tables.
The result, after painting, looks like stone or even marble, a glossy top, but it seems like an easy way to transform formica inexpensively.
Does that help?
I have seen a lot of people suggesting using this kind of coating over colored paper, stones, gravel, sand, glass to make the countertop durable.
What do you think?
elliott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 09:12 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,264
Default

Paint and resin coat countertop


Ok, so you have an acrylic paint over formica, and a thick epoxy coating over the acrylic paint to protect it.

I presume that this is the epoxy coating you used:

http://www.newparks.com/parksclear-pg.html

http://www.newparks.com/PDF/71540-Instructions_FP.pdf

When you work with oil based finishes, you'd want to apply the second coat before the first coat fully cures (or within 24 hours) to ensure good crosslinking between coats for maximum adhesion.

However, you're dealing with a two part epoxy here, and epoxy is well known for sticking well. I don't believe you should apply any more epoxy before the first application has fully cured. If inter-coat adhesion was of any concern, that PDF file would suggest you pour the second coat within the 72 hour curing time of the first coat. They don't suggest that, so I think you're better off to apply two completely separate coats and rely on the high adhesive strength of epoxy to ensure good adhesion between coats. (just make sure the surface of the first coat is clean before pouring the second coat or any dirt is gonna become permanently encased in epoxy)

Also, you say you need more epoxy in certain spots. If you just poured more epoxy onto certain areas without covering the whole counter top, then you'd see the edges of the areas covered with a second coat. I think you'd be better off to buy enough of the stuff to cover the entire counter top completely with the second coat rather than just trying to cover certain areas. Even if you have to wait to get more epoxy, I'd ensure you have enough to cover the whole top and not just the areas you think need more epoxy.

The attached PDF file says to wipe down the first coat with alcohol or acetone before pouring on the second coat to ensure maximum adhesion between coats.

So, I'd follow the instructions and allow the first coat to cure completely, and then wipe it down with acetone, allow two or three minutes for the acetone to evaporate, and then pour and level your second coat.

Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 11-20-2008 at 09:27 PM.
Nestor_Kelebay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 09:44 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 3
Default

Paint and resin coat countertop


Thank you again,
That was very helpful and I will follow your advice. I did see that cleaning with alchol was suggested. I need to get more product to get a full coat on, By then, I will have reached the 72 hour mark. I really apprecite your response.
elliott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2008, 12:21 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,264
Default

Paint and resin coat countertop


Good luck with that second coat.

Sounds like a cheap easy way to breathe new life into an old counter top.

Nestor_Kelebay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flat over Semi-Gloss dankreboot Painting 21 02-24-2013 07:46 PM
Ceiling paint versus wall paint billyg Painting 6 02-09-2012 07:38 PM
semi gloss enamel vs eggshell enamel NoExperience Painting 18 03-05-2009 04:57 AM
Re-Painting textured walls: the Frustration New2DIY Painting 20 07-06-2008 03:10 PM
Best protective finish for old barn-board, used as table? BradG Painting 8 06-18-2008 11:30 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.