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Old 03-19-2014, 09:08 AM   #1
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Paint Removal


Greetings fellow DIY folks,

I am attempting to remove the paint from a banister and spindles. I also will be removing paint from the dining room entry frame and door frames. I am at a loss becuase I am not sure about what to use. I was told several different things work best. Someone suggested using Jasco paint remover, Smart Strip, then there was peel away 1 or 7, and the "Real" Speedheater (looks real tempting). Are there better products to use? They all seem to have some pro's but I am a novice at this and want the job to go as quickly and smoothly as possible. Any suggestions? I know at some point, I will have to do some scraping to get rid of some paint. Is this a DIY or should I have professional come and do it?


I want to get rid of the current paint and get down to the original wood (but dont damage), then shellac.

It appears that I have several layers on the stairway but dont know how many. I have attached a picture to show exactly what I am working with.

Thanks in advance for your comments and suggestions!!
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Paint Removal-steps.jpg  

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Old 03-19-2014, 09:54 AM   #2
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Paint Removal


In this instance I would have a pro come look at it. With some of the strippers you named they will remove the paint, but they can change the color of the wood or leave black streaks. This is OK if you want to repaint but if you want to stain and clear finish you don't want this. Some strippers leave the wood spongey and almost all will raise the grain. A lot of work with a heat gun and scrappers and dental picks may be the way to go.

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Old 03-19-2014, 10:06 AM   #3
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Paint Removal


I hate to say this, but, in this instance the hassle and the time involved to do what you are wanting to do, well, I would just buy all new & stain it the way you want. I know that's not an answer you want to hear, but, those stripping chemicals are nasty, and, as Toolseeker pointed out, you can do more damage than good.

In addition, you may not like what's under all that paint. They painted it for a reason? I've seen that scenario many times. Paint is stripped and the wood underneath is toast. Just give it some serious thought before diving into a very tough project.
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Old 03-19-2014, 12:56 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
I hate to say this, but, in this instance the hassle and the time involved to do what you are wanting to do, well, I would just buy all new & stain it the way you want. I know that's not an answer you want to hear, but, those stripping chemicals are nasty, and, as Toolseeker pointed out, you can do more damage than good.

In addition, you may not like what's under all that paint. They painted it for a reason? I've seen that scenario many times. Paint is stripped and the wood underneath is toast. Just give it some serious thought before diving into a very tough project.
You both make valid points (Toolseeker & Gymschu), but how do you know if the wood is bad before making such a purchase? I am sure the cost of 3 newels, 2 half newels and at least 20-25 spindles can be costly. Do you think it would come out realtively the same price after stripping, labor, and shellac?
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Old 03-19-2014, 01:06 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by ratch333 View Post
You both make valid points (Toolseeker & Gymschu), but how do you know if the wood is bad before making such a purchase? I am sure the cost of 3 newels, 2 half newels and at least 20-25 spindles can be costly. Do you think it would come out realtively the same price after stripping, labor, and shellac?
If called me I'd bet buying new would be cheaper with WAY less risk.

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Old 03-19-2014, 01:56 PM   #6
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There's really no easy way to find out if you have good wood underneath the paint or not. I guess if it were me, I would remove a spindle and strip it completely to see what's there. It might be beautiful old growth oak which could be stained and finished beautifully. Then again, it might just be some standard paint-grade poplar.
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Old 03-19-2014, 06:04 PM   #7
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I think you have the wrong impression when we say bad wood. What we mean is wood that doesn't stain well or look good stained. Again I would have someone look at it. Some have the tools and means to do this.
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:59 AM   #8
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Be careful using paint thinners, they will not only remove your paint, but also your all paint if you do not care of the paints if you have the patience, use a high grit sand paper and lots of water to return the paint to a nice shine this procedure is best i think all of these...
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:04 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darren222 View Post
Be careful using paint thinners, they will not only remove your paint, but also your all paint if you do not care of the paints if you have the patience, use a high grit sand paper and lots of water to return the paint to a nice shine this procedure is best i think all of these...
Darren, you mentioned in another post that you are just learning how to paint. It might be best that you wait a few more years before handing out erroneous information.
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:51 PM   #10
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Darren, you mentioned in another post that you are just learning how to paint. It might be best that you wait a few more years before handing out erroneous information.

a FEW years??
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Old 04-14-2014, 05:52 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darren222 View Post
Be careful using paint thinners, they will not only remove your paint, but also your all paint if you do not care of the paints if you have the patience, use a high grit sand paper and lots of water to return the paint to a nice shine this procedure is best i think all of these...

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Old 04-15-2014, 10:37 AM   #12
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Those type of spindles are typically not going to be a nice stainable wood.

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