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Old 10-25-2011, 08:33 AM   #1
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Paint over primer


Is it necessary to paint over a primer? I have primed a previously painted ceiling and am ok with the color of the primer.

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Old 10-26-2011, 04:56 AM   #2
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Paint over primer


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Originally Posted by syogod View Post
Is it necessary to paint over a primer? I have primed a previously painted ceiling and am ok with the color of the primer.

Necessary? no

Should you? yes

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Old 10-26-2011, 12:41 PM   #3
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If it's not broken leave it alone

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Old 10-26-2011, 04:19 PM   #4
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:31 AM   #5
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Paint over primer


Different paints are designed for different purposes. Take for example your primer. It is made to be porous to maximize adhesion for the topcoat(finishing paint). This means that if you just leave it as is, it is more likely to accumulate dirt than a glossy paint. The finishing paint, on the other hand is designed to have less pores and hence is much smoother. This ensures that it attract the least amount of dirt possible.

However, it still all comes down to whatever your preference is. Its your house, its your ceiling and most definitely its your decision.

Hope this helps!
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Old 12-02-2011, 07:18 AM   #6
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Paint over primer


Something's fishy here, three new posters in this tiny thread, and two are from the UK. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Syogod, finish the ceiling. Primer isn't formulated for long term exposure and will get dingy/nasty looking in time. Then you'll have to reprime prior to finishing at that time.
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Old 12-02-2011, 08:24 AM   #7
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Paint over primer


I also vote for painting it.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:07 PM   #8
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Paint over primer


I've seen a lot of homes with primer only sealings or flat paint only (no primer) sealings. For the most part, I haven't seen any failure of any kind with either process. Ceilings don't tent to get dirty. And if they gain water marks from leaks, it's going to show up regardless if you have primer and paint on it. If I were to go with a flat sheen on the ceiling, I would be ok with using just primer, but I am very leery of just going with flat paint only. At least with a primer you can recoat the ceiling in the future with paint and still have good adhesion.

The BEST recommendation is primer and paint. But primer only won't hurt it any.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:41 PM   #9
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If I were to go with a flat sheen on the ceiling, I would be ok with using just primer
Agreed, although he DID say it's previously painted.

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Old 12-02-2011, 03:56 PM   #10
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Agreed, although he DID say it's previously painted.

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Well, there ya go. Call it good and move on. Nothing you can do to change it now.

A previously painted ceiling doesn't require primer. Just a new coat of paint.
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Old 12-02-2011, 04:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by syogod View Post
Is it necessary to paint over a primer? I have primed a previously painted ceiling and am ok with the color of the primer.
Hiya Syo...

As Surf said, primers are formulated to behave differently than finish coats - though primers are less, not more, porous than finish paints (especially when you're talking about ceiling paint as your finish)...but he was right when he said primers will collect more dirt. And Jason said ceiling don't tend to collect dirt like walls do, and that's true if all you're talking about is handprints and the like.

The reason primers will collect more dirt than wall paints is due to type of resin and specific additives that primers possess that finish products may not. You can have both an acrylic primer and an acrylic finish yet they could be completely different resins. Some acrylic resins dry hard and are somewhat resistant to burnishing and have a degree of stain resistance - these types of acrylics would be more commonly used in finish paints since both of those characteristics would be desirable in a finish...

Other acrylics may dry to a softer, "gummier" film that is not as stain or burnish resistant, and more apt to soften (even more) with heat and humidity as opposed to another type acrylic. These, then, would typically be used for primers since the softer, slower dry finish is necessary in primers to bind any remnant sanding / drywall dust while still providing adhesion to the surface.

So...if you leave a primer as a finish, and because the resins are probably those that I've described, the dirt that the film collects is mostly air-borne particles that settle on the soft finish, become embedded into the film (as it softens and re-hardens during periods of high humidity), then could possibly create issues when it comes time to repaint.

I'm generalizing. I have no idea what type of resin is used in whatever primer you're using, but if this particular primer is designated as a multi-purpose primer (wood, drywall, plaster, plastic, small children, etc.), then I'm probably right and wouldn't want to take the chance on it. Good luck.

Last edited by ric knows paint; 12-02-2011 at 04:37 PM.
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Old 12-02-2011, 04:36 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by ric knows paint View Post
Hiya Syo...

As Surf said, primers are formulated to behave differently than finish coats - though primers are less, not more, porous than finish paints (especially when you're talking about ceiling paint as your finish)...but he was right when he said primers will collect more dirt. And Jason said ceiling don't tend to collect dirt like walls do, and that's true if all you're talking about is handprints and the like.

The reason primers will collect more dirt than wall paints is due to type of resin and specific additives that primers possess that finish products may not. You can have both an acrylic primer and an acrylic finish yet they could be completely different resins. Some acrylic resins dry hard and are somewhat resistant to burnishing and have a degree of stain resistance - these types of acrylics would be more commonly used in finish paints since you need both of those characteristics would be desirable...

Other acrylics may dry to a softer, "gummier" film that is not as stain or burnish resistant, and more apt to soften (even more) with heat and humidity as opposed to another type acrylic. These, then, would typically be used for primers since the softer, slower dry finish is necessary in primers to bind any remnant sanding / drywall dust while still providing adhesion to the surface.

So...if you leave a primer as a finish, and because the resins are probably those that I've described, the dirt that the film collects is mostly air-borne particles that settle on the soft finish, become embedded into the film (as it softens and re-hardens during periods of high humidity), then could possibly create issues when it comes time to repaint.

I'm generalizing. I have no idea what type of resin is used in whatever primer you're using, but if this particular primer is designated as a multi-purpose primer (wood, drywall, plaster, plastic, small children, etc.), then I'm probably right and wouldn't want to take the chance on it. Good luck.
Makes sense to me. Thanks Ric, learn something new everyday. Same principle of unpainted caulk collecting dirt.

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