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Old 04-24-2012, 10:14 AM   #1
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


Redoing a bathroom; the bathroom has not been in use for 8+ months.

I scraped off all the pealing paint over the tub down to the ceiling drywall, sanded the edges to feather them, covered now exposed screw heads and the perimeter with joint compound, primed it with Gardz, put an initial coat of paint on just this area with Zinnser white egg shell paint that was mixed with a small amount of sand to get the same slight sand texture on the remainder of the ceiling. Then put a finished coat over this area and the rest of the ceiling.

Now to my problems and what I can learn/improve on.

1. Sand Paint Texture

I mixed a very small amount of sand with some paint in a separate container. The areas I painted either came out with little to no sand on them, OR too much sand on the area. The too much sand areas seemed to occur when I was getting to the bottom of the separate container I was using for the mixture. Seems like the sand sinks to the bottom, thus most comes out at the end.

Any suggestions on getting an even amount of sand with the right texture on a painted part?

2. Paint Bubbling Up and Peeling Off

I was almost done when in an area far away from the tub, the paint being rolled on just bubbled up leaving 2 good sized sags (about 2 - 3 in diameter) on the ceiling. Note this room has not been used for 8+ months. I scraped off the area (down to the ceiling wallboard) and now have an area about 1 x 3 to fix.

What caused this to happen? How do I avoid it in the future?

3. Perimeter of Fixed Area Over Tub With Joint Compound Shows

While I sanded sown the joint compound and feather the areas, from the fixed area to the rest of the ceiling, you can still see a difference after the final paint coat where these two areas meet.

Is there a way to avoid this?


Any and all input on each problem is appreciated. I would like to learn from my mistakes.

thanks

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Old 04-24-2012, 11:26 AM   #2
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


Quote:
Originally Posted by jdbs3 View Post
...covered now exposed screw heads and the perimeter with joint compound... should have driven them in, then mudded over

....with a small amount of sand... mix frequently if you do this again. sand always sinks in paint, being more dense.

2. Paint Bubbling Up and Peeling Off
What caused this to happen? No idea. Someone likely got oil/chit on drywall before it was put up?

3. Perimeter of Fixed Area Over Tub With Joint Compound Shows
Is there a way to avoid this? You can mud the entire surface w/ a thin layer.
See after bullets. Hope it helps.

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Old 04-24-2012, 01:21 PM   #3
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


1.
Quote:
mix frequently if you do this again. sand always sinks in paint, being more dense.
Resolved - thanks

Quote:
2. Paint Bubbling Up and Peeling Off
What caused this to happen? No idea. Someone likely got oil/chit on drywall before it was put up?
Anyone else? This was my biggest frustration.

Quote:
3. Perimeter of Fixed Area Over Tub With Joint Compound Shows
Is there a way to avoid this? You can mud the entire surface w/ a thin layer.
Agree, but that is not practical for a large ceiling area. Any other ideas?
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Old 04-24-2012, 01:54 PM   #4
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


Regarding #2, there is no way to be sure but your best bet is to prime, skim with mud, sand, then reprime.

As for #3, define "practical". In my book, practical is what works well for a reasonable amount of effort. Sanding the edges of chipped paint to "feather" it and make the edges disappear *never* works. Ever. Get a wide knife and skim it, then sand then prime. It's not nearly as difficult as you might think.

I did not see you use "primer" once in your original post. Did you not prime any of this, even though it is old paint? Certainly where you've taken it down to the wallboard you should, and I would everwhere else as well.
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Old 04-24-2012, 09:05 PM   #5
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironlight View Post
Regarding #2, there is no way to be sure but your best bet is to prime, skim with mud, sand, then reprime.

As for #3, define "practical". In my book, practical is what works well for a reasonable amount of effort. Sanding the edges of chipped paint to "feather" it and make the edges disappear *never* works. Ever. Get a wide knife and skim it, then sand then prime. It's not nearly as difficult as you might think.

I did not see you use "primer" once in your original post. Did you not prime any of this, even though it is old paint? Certainly where you've taken it down to the wallboard you should, and I would everwhere else as well.
I read someone else the other day say something like, "primer is a problem solver". Definitely sand down those problem areas, clean with a degreaser if you think there's something on the wall, and use a good primer before you repaint.
Then there's the paint brand issue - if you're using cheap paint you may not get the finish you want so you may need to look into that also...
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Old 04-24-2012, 10:07 PM   #6
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


If the paint that was previoulsy on the walls was oil based, that could why it is lifting, or if someone had oil on thier hands and even if the wall was wiped, it will still do this. Whenever we bought a different house, we ALWAYS primed first, as you never know what was put on the walls. Oil and gloss latex are easily mistaken for one another, and they were a popular choice for kitchen and bathrooms because of their durability to clean and not be effected by humidity caused by showers and pots boiling on the stove.
As far as your ceiling goes, the suggestions previously made really are the most cost effective. Scrape and skim coat. It time is more valuable to you than money, you can purchase plastic tiles that look like they are metal, or you can buy the the ones that are paintable. They are easy to install and a breeze to cut to fit. I've seen people put wallpaper in thier bathrooms, so you may want to buy some textured, paintable wallpaper and glue that on over the ceiling. I can't say how long it will last, but I do know people who have put wallpapers in their bathrooms and it held up for years.
You were looking for suggestions.......
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:40 PM   #7
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Paint Mistakes - How to Improve


Thanks to all for your feedback. This is just a ceiling issue; the walls are ok.

Quote:
I did not see you use "primer" once in your original post.
See my initial message - the spot that was originally peeling was skimmed, sanded, primed with Gardz and painted.

As suggested, for this new (unexpected) problem spot I'll do the following:
Quote:
prime, skim with mud, sand, then reprime.
RE:

Quote:
As for #3, ... Sanding the edges of chipped paint to "feather" it and make the edges disappear *never* works. Ever. Get a wide knife and skim it, then sand then prime.
That is what I did. I think the boundary I am seeing is partially the result of one area (the area fixed) being newly sand painted, and (I'll need to wait for good sun light) a slight color white difference between the area fixed and the rest of the ceiling. Either way, it is what it is.

The paint brand was Zinsser Perma-White Eggshell Mold and Mildew Proof Paint.

Again thanks for the feedback. I'm all set going forward less any new problems.

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