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Old 08-10-2014, 11:02 PM   #16
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So the process you use Dave is "usually" cheaper than new cabinets!? Hmm, maybe just buy new cabinets if it's that close, that would save a lot of time!

If regular mortals with things to do want to try this, you can save some time. If something needs 2 washes with TSP, then there's probably so much gunk that it should be scraped off, not washed. Anyway, assuming it's just normal greasy film, one washing should do it. Not sure how many layers of sandpaper you're going through, but just one sanding should also do it, maybe with 150 grit. Only some real paint peeling or scratches should require much coarser. Also 1 coat of primer and a sanding before the finish coats should be fine.

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Old 08-10-2014, 11:03 PM   #17
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A light scuff sanding is all it needs unless they are unusually rough.
Never any need for two coats of primer if you use the right one the first time.
Never say never. Even with the right primer there can be slight imperfections. A light sanding and re-prime eliminates them. I aim for a factory quality finish on my cabinet re-paints and with my method I've never had a call-back.
So thanks for critiquing my method but I'll stick to what works for me and my clients.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:05 PM   #18
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Never say never. Even with the right primer there can be slight imperfections. A light sanding and re-prime eliminates them. I aim for a factory quality finish on my cabinet re-paints and with my method I've never had a call-back.
So thanks for critiquing my method but I'll stick to what works for me and my clients.
I've never had a call back either in almost 30 years. Stick with what works for you brother.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:07 PM   #19
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So the process you use Dave is "usually" cheaper than new cabinets!? Hmm, maybe just buy new cabinets if it's that close, that would save a lot of time!

If regular mortals with things to do want to try this, you can save some time. If something needs 2 washes with TSP, then there's probably so much gunk that it should be scraped off, not washed. Anyway, assuming it's just normal greasy film, one washing should do it. Not sure how many layers of sandpaper you're going through, but just one sanding should also do it, maybe with 150 grit. Only some real paint peeling or scratches should require much coarser. Also 1 coat of primer and a sanding before the finish coats should be fine.
Some clients do choose to go with new cabinets when they learn the cost of a quality re-paint. Others don't. Quality work takes time, and time costs money. Happy clients and a good reputation are worth it in the end.
Best of luck with your methods, I'll stick to mine.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:13 PM   #20
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And I'm sure some look for cheaper refinishes, too.

It's not a question of whether quality work takes time. Everyone knows it does. The point is, no DIYer is going to spend as much to refinish their cabinets as they would on new cabinets. That is the whole point - refinishing is a lot cheaper. This is a DIY forum for solutions DIYers might choose.
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Old 08-12-2014, 07:26 AM   #21
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Thanks for the info everyone, I appreciate people taking the time to lay it out for me and not be judgemental.

Today begins the process of stripping...
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Old 08-12-2014, 08:10 AM   #22
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I think a lot depends on the shape of the cabinets if they are high quality, if they are wood, if they are in good shape, then they are worth saving. Plus there's the option of new fronts and doors. I would consider all this before even thinking of replacing. Plus use the search feature here and on Paint talk there are many threads on painting cabinets.
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Old 08-12-2014, 03:24 PM   #23
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Thanks for the info everyone, I appreciate people taking the time to lay it out for me and not be judgemental.

Today begins the process of stripping...
Reflecting on your paint peeling problem on your kitchen cabinets, I'm thinking that after you strip and clean any remaining cooking grease film, that using an oil primer would be better than using a water based primer. Just using the reasoning that oil (cooking grease) and water don't mix.

Maybe paint professionals can confirm whether using an oil primer for re-painting kitchen cabinets would have a better chance of sticking, or not.

HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 08-12-2014 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 08-12-2014, 05:31 PM   #24
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Reflecting on your paint peeling problem on your kitchen cabinets, I'm thinking that after you strip and clean any remaining cooking grease film, that using an oil primer would be better than using a water based primer. Just using the reasoning that oil (cooking grease) and water don't mix.

Maybe paint professionals can confirm whether using an oil primer for re-painting kitchen cabinets would have a better chance of sticking, or not.

HRG
Probably, but if they are stripped, then they would be free of any cooking oils, right?
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Old 08-12-2014, 06:40 PM   #25
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Yeah, but it's a good question. Just how stripped is stripped? For example, think how well you have to rinse TSP off of things after washing. Oil paint may very well be good for small amounts of oily residue, I'm not sure.
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Old 08-13-2014, 01:12 AM   #26
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Probably, but if they are stripped, then they would be free of any cooking oils, right?
Hmmm, it won't help the OP now but I wonder if cleaning, rinsing and then using an "oil" primer would have worked for the OP in his/her initial effort?

As far as stripping down to bare wood, my understanding from previous research (for painting the exterior of our house) is that oil primers have a better chance of soaking into bare wood than water based primers. So maybe using an oil primer might be good for that plus if any residual cooking grease is present?

Just throwing some ideas out there,
HRG
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Old 08-13-2014, 07:02 AM   #27
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I think water based primers soak into wood as well, because of the water, but the problem is it tends to swell the wood cells and raise the grain. With oil, especially if you thin it a little with a solvent, will also soak into the wood but without any swelling.
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Old 08-13-2014, 04:04 PM   #28
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This is correct water or water based will raise the grain this will require sanding smooth again. Oil will not raise the grain.

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