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Old 08-09-2014, 07:07 AM   #1
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Paint disaster requires help!


So my entire kitchen is covered in paint that is easily peeling away from the wood.

The deal is I went to Lowes and explained to them that I wanted to paint my kitchen cupboards so she recommended Para Optima paint. I prepped the surface by cleaning and drying it. After three coats I noticed it was very easily peeling away. From what I read the instructions on the can did not say that wood required a primer coat.

I went back to the store with this problem and they recommended that I rough up the surface of the already painted parts for better adhesion, and paint right over that with a valspar product they suggested.

I did this for another three coats and the paint still impotently slides off much of the painted surface.

Two questions, is Lowes responsible at all here for selling inappropriate products for the job I explained/ giving poor advice, did I misread the instructions on the can? What should I do to fix this?

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Old 08-09-2014, 07:22 AM   #2
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Paint disaster requires help!


idk. but i would say that the only liability lowes will suffer is returning you your money.

it has been said on this forum MANY MANY times = DO NOT take the advice from the box store people.

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Old 08-09-2014, 07:29 AM   #3
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Paint disaster requires help!


If you do any kind of reading/searching on here at all, you will find that 99.9% of the time when painting cabinets, you need a BONDING PRIMER. And that's after you scuff sand the glossy surface, remove any and all traces of dirt and grease, and basically clean the surface as if you will eat off of it. Your topcoats can't stick to a glossy surface WITHOUT PROPER PREP WORK. Putting more paint on NOW in hopes of it sticking is fruitless and counter productive. Sand off as much as you can and start over.

I know, the next question is what type of bonding primer. Zinsser's 123 is great but doesn't work in all applications. It is water-based and sometimes you get bleed through of the oils in the wood of the cabinets. Zinsser also makes an oil-based bonding/stain blocking primer that takes care of that type of situation and it's called Cover Stain.
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Old 08-09-2014, 07:38 AM   #4
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Paint disaster requires help!


As to what the others said, lowes may give your $$ back. You'll have to start over. How were the cabinets finished before you started? Were they painted or shellaced?

Seek out a paint store when you're ready.

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Old 08-09-2014, 07:41 AM   #5
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Paint disaster requires help!


the good news is = if the paint is coming off that easy. it should be pretty easy to remove the rest of it.
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Old 08-09-2014, 07:48 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
If you do any kind of reading/searching on here at all, you will find that 99.9% of the time when painting cabinets, you need a BONDING PRIMER. And that's after you scuff sand the glossy surface, remove any and all traces of dirt and grease, and basically clean the surface as if you will eat off of it. Your topcoats can't stick to a glossy surface WITHOUT PROPER PREP WORK. Putting more paint on NOW in hopes of it sticking is fruitless and counter productive. Sand off as much as you can and start over.

I know, the next question is what type of bonding primer. Zinsser's 123 is great but doesn't work in all applications. It is water-based and sometimes you get bleed through of the oils in the wood of the cabinets. Zinsser also makes an oil-based bonding/stain blocking primer that takes care of that type of situation and it's called Cover Stain.
Great advice. Have to strip it down and start from scratch!
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:24 AM   #7
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Paint disaster requires help!


What is on there now is not bonding to the smooth surface to just put something over it will not do anything to make it bond. Even primer won't work until this is removed then scuff sand and prime then paint. Probably wouldn't do any good but I would go back and tell Lowe's thanks for the mess.
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:42 AM   #8
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Paint disaster requires help!


Lowes is actually being pretty good about the whole thing I have a meeting scheduled for Wednesday with one of the managers to discuss options, so I guess they're being helpful after the fact.
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Old 08-09-2014, 09:53 AM   #9
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Paint disaster requires help!


One thing the box stores are good about is returning your money, and you don't even always need a very good reason.

There are some really good people in those stores, but you have to be armed with some good info going in. If you are educated, then you can have a discussion with them and if part of what they tell you goes against what you know to be true, then there's a pretty good chance the stuff they're telling you outside your area of knowledge is bad too.

Of course this is true in "real" paint stores too - there are some dingbats working in those places too. Just fewer of them.
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Old 08-09-2014, 12:10 PM   #10
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Paint disaster requires help!


You're getting good advice here. Very few box store employees actually have experience and know what works. They have some good products but they must be used correctly.
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Old 08-10-2014, 05:43 PM   #11
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Paint disaster requires help!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Edit View Post
So my entire kitchen is covered in paint that is easily peeling away from the wood.

The deal is I went to Lowes and explained to them that I wanted to paint my kitchen cupboards so she recommended Para Optima paint. I prepped the surface by cleaning and drying it. After three coats I noticed it was very easily peeling away. From what I read the instructions on the can did not say that wood required a primer coat.
I read on a forum before (maybe this one) that for kitchen cabinets, ALL of the grease film build up on the cabinets MUST be throughly removed first before any sanding or other prep work. Sanding without cleaning first just grinds the oil film into the wood.

This may be your problem as paint will not stick to a grease film. Maybe your cleaning before painting was not through enough? As others mentioned scuff sanding (after a through cleaning) sounds like a good idea.

$.02,
HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 08-10-2014 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:12 PM   #12
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Paint disaster requires help!


1) What EXACTLY was used to clean the cabs initially?
2) Was any rinsing involved?

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Old 08-10-2014, 09:20 PM   #13
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Paint disaster requires help!


You must first strip the cabinet then paint. Mistake already made and currently in my kitchen.

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Old 08-10-2014, 10:31 PM   #14
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Paint disaster requires help!


Here are the steps I use when painting cabinets:
1- Remove the doors and drawer fronts and all hardware.
2- Wash everything with TSP and rinse well with clean water.
3- Repeat step 2.
4- Sand all surfaces progressing from coarse to fine grit papers.
5- Damp rags or tack clothes to remove dust.
6- Paint with a good quality primer.
7- Light sanding with 220 or finer paper. And then prime again.
8-Tack cloth again.
9- Two coats of paint with a light spot sanding between coats where needed.
That's about it. It's hard, time consuming, and fairly expensive, but usually cheaper than new cabinets.
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Old 08-10-2014, 10:56 PM   #15
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Paint disaster requires help!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Davejss View Post
Here are the steps I use when painting cabinets:
1- Remove the doors and drawer fronts and all hardware.
2- Wash everything with TSP and rinse well with clean water.
3- Repeat step 2.
4- Sand all surfaces progressing from coarse to fine grit papers.
5- Damp rags or tack clothes to remove dust.
6- Paint with a good quality primer.
7- Light sanding with 220 or finer paper. And then prime again.
8-Tack cloth again.
9- Two coats of paint with a light spot sanding between coats where needed.
That's about it. It's hard, time consuming, and fairly expensive, but usually cheaper than new cabinets.
A light scuff sanding is all it needs unless they are unusually rough.
Never any need for two coats of primer if you use the right one the first time.

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