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-   -   Paint bubbles (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/paint-bubbles-173903/)

jho 03-08-2013 09:17 AM

I need some help from the pros. Ive been an exterior painter professionally for about 12 years now, with minimal interior experience. Everything Ive learned on interior painting has pretty much been self taught. Im working on a customer's house right now, much drywall repair required. Im using the 5 minute sheetrock patching compound to repair these imperfections, letting them dry, sanding them, wiping walls down with a tack cloth, washing the walls with a damp cloth, wait for that to dry, apply primer to patches, wait to dry, then painting. Now Im getting these little bubbles popping up everywhere. What am I doing wrong? Please help

Brushjockey 03-08-2013 09:21 AM

What primer are you using? What paint?

jho 03-08-2013 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey
What primer are you using? What paint?

Well I started with the SW latex primer, and then the second attempt I tried the Odorless oil based primer. Same thing.

Im using SW's Cashmere low lustre latex paint

Mr. Paint 03-08-2013 11:04 AM

Is the peeling just onn the patched areas or is it on the entire wall? Have you tried rolling out just the Cashmere finish on an unprimed, unpatched wall, such as a closet? Doing this will help isolate the cause. What size roller nap are you using?

The one thing I think you can eliminate from your prep is a tack cloth. In drywall finishing/repair only a rag dampened with clear water is necessary. Tack cloths may leave an oily residue behind that a latex topcoat could react to.

ToolSeeker 03-08-2013 12:22 PM

Most tack clothes are soaked with a varnish-like material. To eliminate this I think will solve your problem.

jsheridan 03-08-2013 05:26 PM

It's the five minute patching compound, it's the heat of the plaster content. It's plaster that causes it to harden. I was having a similar problem when I was on my three coats of 45 minute patching compound kick. I was getting bubbles and no one could tell me why. In researching online I stumbled across an out of the way place and found that answer. I switched to two coats of 45 and one final coat of blue lid and the problem went away. I haven't had it since, about three years now.

jho 03-08-2013 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolSeeker (Post 1132499)
Most tack clothes are soaked with a varnish-like material. To eliminate this I think will solve your problem.

Yeah, I opted out on using those some more. The ones I was using were especially stickier than some I've used in the past, so I believe this to be true.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Paint (Post 1132440)
Is the peeling just onn the patched areas or is it on the entire wall? Have you tried rolling out just the Cashmere finish on an unprimed, unpatched wall, such as a closet? Doing this will help isolate the cause. What size roller nap are you using?

The one thing I think you can eliminate from your prep is a tack cloth. In drywall finishing/repair only a rag dampened with clear water is necessary. Tack cloths may leave an oily residue behind that a latex topcoat could react to.

I ended up wiping all the walls down with a damp rag, primed the patches with a new quart of latex primer, and put two coats on with no bubbles popping up. I forgot to mention that the primer I was using before gave off a smell that I was unfamiliar with, kind of a sweet, nutty smell so I figured the shelf life was probably expired on it.

So, it's all good now. I think I eliminated the problem by removing the tack cloths from the process and using a new quart of primer.

Thanks for all your suggestions!

Gymschu 03-08-2013 06:52 PM

Gonna go with JSheridan on this one. I have had the same happen to me so I quit using the quickset stuff and haven't had a problem since.........maybe someone brighter than me can explain the chemistry of why this happens.

jsheridan 03-08-2013 10:17 PM

Possible his new primer has high alkalinity resistance. It's basically plaster, the quicker the dry the more plaster. Five minute stuff, boy do you even get up the ladder? Five is not really for spot patching, it's for heavy work, like filling big holes that need quick turn around.
The moment I read why I was having that problem, and I was having it alot, it dawned on me that it started when I changed my system. Once I switched back it went away for good.

ToolSeeker 03-09-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gymschu (Post 1132786)
Gonna go with JSheridan on this one. I have had the same happen to me so I quit using the quickset stuff and haven't had a problem since.........maybe someone brighter than me can explain the chemistry of why this happens.

I am by no means a chemist but here is what I think. Setting muds 5,20, 45, 90 all set by a chemical reaction not by drying that is how they can control the time. This chemical reaction then affects paint and primer. So that is why it is normally used 1st maybe 2nd then it is topped with a drying mud whice is not affected and you paint and prime over the drying mud plus it's a lot easier to sand and finish. The quickset stuff is a great product if used right. Just don't use it for final coat. Hope this helps.

ltd 03-09-2013 02:43 PM

I have had the same problem over the years:censored:. A lot of times I cant Waite for joint compound to dry:no:.one thing I have found out ,I use to mix the mud in the tray using a 6 inch knife ,and I still do ,but now I also use a putty knife to mix it real good .you have to get in the corners of the tray and make sure there is no dry pockets of mud when you are Appling to the wall .in conclusion:huh: stir it good. I am about 2 years with out a bubble:huh:


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