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Old 07-09-2009, 03:40 AM   #1
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Paining my car?


Hi all,

Is it really possible to paint my own car myself? if possible what are the necessary equipments and raw-materials required? what are the tricks and tips and where to start with? how long does it take?

I have no prior idea on this except i know that the paint is sprayed to the car?

Thanks all

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Old 07-09-2009, 05:21 AM   #2
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Paining my car?


That is about it. You need the right spray gun and knowledge on how to use it. The lacquer is available at local automotive paint stores and some Sherwin Williams stores. Wet dry paper and masking materials are also available at these outlets. How long it takes depends on your skills. Prep and taping off areas not to be painted take the most time. Painting only takes about 30 minutes for each coat. One primer and two to three top coats and maybe one more clear coat.

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Old 07-09-2009, 07:56 AM   #3
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My brother has an auto/body shop. Painting a car requires different prep materials and different paint. All auto paints have to be mixed at the time it goes into the paint gun. (All pneumatic tools.) The outcome will show inferior products and tools. Auto painting is quite different than house painting. I've been around it most of my life and wouldn't consider attempting it myself if I wanted the vehicle to look good . There is a lot more prep work involved in painting a vehicle as opposed to a house. It takes YEARS of practice to learn the art of spraying an auto and many in the profession do body work only, as not all of them master the painting end of it. If you want your vehicle to look good, I'd take to a an auto/body shop for painting. One can always see the DIY auto paint job....they all stand out like a sore thumb.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:41 AM   #4
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Paining my car?


I painted a 66 Mustang years ago
Due to body work the paint was much better then what was there
It di not come out that bad...for International Harvester Orange

But the roof came out excellent
Took about 12 hours with taping, painting, waiting for it to dry, then the next coat
The dirt/discoloration you see is actually on the photograph ...not the car

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Old 07-09-2009, 08:43 AM   #5
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Paining my car?


Short answer: yes, with an if.
- yes, you can paint your own car, IF, you are willing to invest in specialized tools, an exquisite amount of prep work, and practicing. And, IF, you don't mind that most DIYers do not get good looking results when they paint their own cars

Long answer: no, with a but.
- No, you cannot paint your own car and get decent results, BUT, you can drop a few hundred bucks (less than you would pay in materials and equipment) on a semi-crappy bodyshop paint job that will look OK from 10 feet.

DO NOT BE TEMPTED TO PICK A DIFFERENT COLOR THAN THE ONE THAT CAME ON YOUR CAR FROM THE FACTORY. Nothing looks worse than when you open your car door/hood and the jambs show that you painted your 2000 silver Lexus lamborghini orange.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:49 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leah Frances View Post
Nothing looks worse than when you open your car door/hood and the jambs show that you painted your 2000 silver Lexus lamborghini orange.
Hey, I said it was International Harvester Glow-in-the-dark Orange
I did everything, couldn't tell the car was originally green unless you removed fenders/body parts

We had a guy at work who painted his car with a paint brush
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:04 AM   #7
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Paining my car?


Dave, of course I assumed you General Lee'd up your Lexus.

DH and I are involved with Spec Miata and lots of racers do their own body work. If you are willing to do it right, I have seen some impressive home done paint jobs, but they required weeks worth of work, HPLV equipment, and dedicated drying/curing rooms.

I had a neighbor in PDX who used a roller and latex paint. Honestly, it didn't look that bad... But, she also used to 'chrome' up her 'rims' every two weeks with a can of metallic spray paint.
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:31 AM   #8
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LOL....can only imagine what that looked like.
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Old 07-09-2009, 12:23 PM   #9
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Guess what the horn sounded like?
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Old 07-09-2009, 02:01 PM   #10
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Paining my car?


Could you jump large rivers without damaging your car?

Did you live with a cousin named Daisy?



Sorry for the thread hijack.
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:20 PM   #11
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Paining my car?


Never tried jumping any rivers
But I would have jumped Daisy
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:40 PM   #12
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roflmao.....
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:32 PM   #13
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Paining my car?


But, you're from MA. A yankee.
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:39 PM   #14
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Paining my car?


Yes, the lettering was going to be "Northern Rebel"
But never got to that
The old man offered to have the car repainted by a Pro
I said "OK"
...without the flag...
I declined
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Old 07-12-2009, 11:18 AM   #15
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Paining my car?


Actually there is a guy on the net who painted a car with white Rustoleum oil and a roller. Lots of wet sanding inbetween coats and the paint was reduced. Buffed and polished it turned out glossy, pretty impressive.

Icon, from what I know auto paints are 2-part, and you add a catalyst timed to flash dry the paint. Using a "hot" catalyst in dry 100 degree weather will make the paint solidify in the gun. Using a "cold" catalyst in rainy 60 degree weather will make the paint still wet and full of bugs a week later. This is important.
-Different brand primers/base coats/clear coats can also shrink/crackle/run/orangepeel/etc, so the pros learn the characteristics of their brand.
-Sand or leftover silicone wax can cause fisheyes.
-Untreated rust can cause problems a year later.
-Small compressors will build up water quickly.
-etc etc. Lots of things to possibly go wrong. Lots of light, and a clean ventilated environment is a must.

If you just want to cover a car with paint, use single-stage paint which has the base coat and clear mixed together. Not as shiny, but you can sand/polish and reapply until the cows come home.
It's easier to just purchase good paint, and give the guy at Maaco a few extra buck to do it right.


Last edited by Stillwerkin; 07-12-2009 at 11:47 AM.
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