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gilcarleton 11-04-2012 06:02 PM

Order of painting
 
Hi There,

I just bought a house new to me that has popcorn ceilings. That was enough to cause me to purchase an airless. I want to paint the entire house before I move in and I am not sure in what order I should paint things. It seems to me that I should paint the ceiling first. I am wondering if I can paint the trim next without masking the walls since any over spray wold be covered when I paint the walls. After I paint the trim, I thought I would mask it and use a shield to protect the ceiling. I plan on using an eggshell on the walls and ceiling and a semi-gloss on the walls. One of the rooms is red...not my style, so it will probably need two coats. What do ya'll think? I have used an airless outside before but I need to learn some technique for the inside. Thanks for the help.

Brushjockey 11-04-2012 06:30 PM

Empty house?
Using an airless sounds like a quick and easy way to do it- but can be disaster fast.
First- I do not recommend anything but a flat on popcorn, why do you want to emphasize it.
And usually an eggshell is all you would need on any walls, and the semi is good on trim.
Most pro's who do spray inside do it as a 2 man team, one backrolling behind the sprayer. If you don't do that , you will never be able to touchup- spray is a texture hard to imitate.
Everything needs to be covered that isn't sprayed. Different tips for different paints.
Etc etc.

I would maybe spray the ceilings, then do the rest the old fashioned way. Much safer.

And make sure to do the right prep on the trim.

oh'mike 11-04-2012 06:30 PM

This is what I might do----Spray the ceilings----spray the trim and doors---then hand cut and roll the walls----

I've worn out a couple of paint pumps----I would not attempt to paint the walls with one---the masking and overspray on the trim and ceilings will cost more time than simply brushing and rolling---

Airless sprayers tend to leave 'spray stripes' on wide open spaces like ceilings and walls---the popcorn will hide that---but the walls will look better with a good two coat roller job---

oh'mike 11-04-2012 06:32 PM

Brush Jockey beat me to it----and added more detail!

ToolSeeker 11-04-2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gilcarleton (Post 1044789)
Hi There,

I just bought a house new to me that has popcorn ceilings. That was enough to cause me to purchase an airless. I want to paint the entire house before I move in and I am not sure in what order I should paint things. It seems to me that I should paint the ceiling first. I am wondering if I can paint the trim next without masking the walls since any over spray wold be covered when I paint the walls. After I paint the trim, I thought I would mask it and use a shield to protect the ceiling. I plan on using an eggshell on the walls and ceiling and a semi-gloss on the walls. One of the rooms is red...not my style, so it will probably need two coats. What do ya'll think? I have used an airless outside before but I need to learn some technique for the inside. Thanks for the help.

OK here's my opinion and i'm sure there will be others, if I'm reading right you are keeping and painting the popcorn (a whole nother topic) if so as Joe would say spray with Gardz first, unless it has already been painted. Yes paint ceiling first, my choice would be a flat ceiling paint but that choice is yours. Then I would paint the walls. Are you aware that semi gloss will highlight every small imperfection on your walls, again your choice. Then I would paint the trim but unless you are taking it all off and spraying it I would suggest painting it with a brush. Now the red room depending on the shade of red and what color is going over it I would suggest at the least have your primer tinted, and yes you need to prime
We must have been answering at the same time Brush.

gilcarleton 11-05-2012 05:45 AM

Thanks for all of the help. I see that I made a typo in my original post. I plan on using eggshell on the walls and ceiling and semi-gloss on the trim. I live in Foley, Alabama about 10 minutes from the gulf but I cannot figure out how to put that on my profile. I will look a little harder after I post this.

I don't like the popcorn ceiling at all but it seems like it would be a huge mess to remove it. Any ideas? It seems strange but every house I looked at in Foley before I bought this one has popcorn ceilings. I thought they had died out years ago but there are certainly popular in Foley, at least with the contractors.

I plan on painting the walls in a cream color and then lighten the pigment about 50% (a rough guess) and do the ceilings. I may use the same color from the ceiling for the trim but in a semi-gloss. White is a little too stark for me.

Great ideas on the back rolling. I think I will just roll the walls. Sounds much safer. Do you think I could shoot the trim in a semi-gloss and then roll the walls and get over it in one coat? How would you prep the trim? Honestly, I usually just paint it but maybe a little sand paper?

I am very happy that I found this site. YouTube can get you into trouble sometimes.:laughing:

oh'mike 11-05-2012 05:53 AM

If the house and trim are new----caulk and putty (glazing compound)

If not pre-primed or painted----prime first-----

For a good quality job----always apply two coats of paint----no paint or painter is good enough to get a top quality job with one coat.

Brushjockey 11-05-2012 07:22 AM

For prepping the wood-
Depends a bit what is on it now and what you are using. The most important to thoroughly prep is going over an oil base with a latex. You need to create adhesion.
A overall sand to break the gloss, wipe clean, use a bonding primer like Zinsser 123, caulk and fill as needed, 2 finish coats would be the normal approach.
I would do the trim first, then the walls. 2 coats is always the way to go.

ToolSeeker 11-05-2012 08:19 AM

Popcorn is popular with contractors because it hides all the flaws so finish work is a lot easier. In my area I do a lot of popcorn removal work because the realtors so nothing dates a house quicker than popcorn. But it is my understanding in some areas they are still doing them. I would talk to a couple realtors in your area to see what they think. Just remember after you paint it, it makes removing it a LOT harder. If it has not been painted before it is easy to remove, messy yes but not hard.

jmd87 11-05-2012 09:00 AM

This is exactly what I'm going through now... next state over in MS.

I rented an airless sprayer and primed the ceilings with kilz original (old owner was a smoker), then painted with a flat contractor grade white by olympic. It would have been awful to roll the flat paint (it was like water), but the sprayer was a dream. I finished all 1700sf in 3 hours or so.

I had leftover primer so I spray primed the walls and & trim too back-rolling during the process (spray primed ceiling & walls at same time, then top coat sprayed only the ceiling). Then I hand painted the trim, then finally rolled the walls. I'll have to touch up the trim but I'm pretty happy with this order and the results.


As a side note, I removed the popcorn ceiling from one bathroom since it was terrible looking. Just had a spray bottle with water, and a 6" wide putty knife and had it down in an hour or so. It was really messy though so doing the entire house would be a lot of work and its not worth it to me. The fresh coat of paint made the popcorn ceilings look decent.

Have fun

stoner529 11-05-2012 11:14 AM

I would only one coat the ceiling first since it is popcorn. Once that dries after a day, give it one more coat. The paint will bond the popcorn and make it very hard to remove if you ever decide to get rid of it. I would advise against painting the walls with the airless. You can't get a good cut in line with just a shield imo.
Quote:

Originally Posted by gilcarleton (Post 1044789)
Hi There,

I just bought a house new to me that has popcorn ceilings. That was enough to cause me to purchase an airless. I want to paint the entire house before I move in and I am not sure in what order I should paint things. It seems to me that I should paint the ceiling first. I am wondering if I can paint the trim next without masking the walls since any over spray wold be covered when I paint the walls. After I paint the trim, I thought I would mask it and use a shield to protect the ceiling. I plan on using an eggshell on the walls and ceiling and a semi-gloss on the walls. One of the rooms is red...not my style, so it will probably need two coats. What do ya'll think? I have used an airless outside before but I need to learn some technique for the inside. Thanks for the help.



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