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Sarasotateve 12-01-2011 02:16 PM

One COAT or TWO?
 
Hi.
I have been reading threads about Resilience and Duration, but I am still confused about what to do. Many of the threads were from several years ago, and hopefully some of the "kinks" have been worked out by SW.

I live in Florida and have had several bids for painting the stucco exterior of my house.
Nobody has mentioned a 2nd coat. Resilience seems to be the most suggested (Super Paint a second) because of its moisture guarantee.

I am covering a light colored SW paint called Colony Buff(2207) - 10 years on the stucco- with a lighter SW color called China Doll (SW7517). Will I ned 1 coat or 2? If I opt for the more expensive Duration, can I cover in one coat instead of 2?

Two of the 4 contractors said that they do not like using the Duration as it is too thick, and they have had trouble with it. Also, the coverage is less that Resilience, but if the less coverage will give me a one coat cover, I might go that way.

Any suggestions will be helpful. I was quoted 19 gallons for the Resilience to do the job. If this is correct, how many gallons of Duration would be needed to cover?

Thanks again.

Steve

Gymschu 12-01-2011 03:01 PM

Rarely does a paint cover and protect in ONE coat, I almost always apply 2 coats no matter what I'm painting. Stucco is especially uneven and would definitely require TWO coats. Duration is touted as a one coat paint and I have used it as such, however, it is tricky to use and wouldn't be my paint of choice in a high humidity state like Florida. Personally, I believe SuperPaint is the absolute best all-around paint SW makes. I would highly consider it for your project. As for how much Duration you might need, it's tough to say........it is thicker and has to be applied to a certain millage so it may take 12 - 15 gallons for your stucco.....but I'm guessing.

chrisn 12-01-2011 05:02 PM

2 coats of whatever

jsheridan 12-01-2011 06:29 PM

Steve, what condition is the stucco in? Does it have any cracking?
To try to cover a darker color with one coat is going to be tough, with any paint on a ten year old finish on stucco. I assume they'll cut and roll and when the rolled area overlaps the cut area, you'll effectively have two coats on that tiny strip, and it will show. I concur with the three others. A ten year old finish has begun to degrade, so the single coat you're contemplating will be required to seal the old surface, be the new surface protector, and look good. Too much for one coat to handle, especially over a darker color.
I'm assuming that since the pros you've sought out haven't suggested an elastomeric product, that your stucco is pristine with no cracking. I'm curious as to why not one would have suggested a second coat, when it's so unanimous here. I think that in these hard times that guys only price for the minimal to get the job, but all of them. Maybe it's a FL thing. I would choose the guy you like best, who impressed you the most, not who has the very best price. Hire him with the understanding that you may be looking to do a conditional second coat, and get a price on that. Do a sample section of one coat/two coat to see the extra bang you get for the buck. If price is a consideration, at least two coat the sides that take the brunt of the weather, you want that protection. The other sides just look pretty. As to which paint you choose, neither, IMO, will be better if only doing one coat, but either will be fine if doing two. I think there, in that situation, you'll be fine buying on price alone between those two.
Joe

chrisn 12-02-2011 03:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 783535)
Steve, what condition is the stucco in? Does it have any cracking?
To try to cover a darker color with one coat is going to be tough, with any paint on a ten year old finish on stucco. I assume they'll cut and roll and when the rolled area overlaps the cut area, you'll effectively have two coats on that tiny strip, and it will show. I concur with the three others. A ten year old finish has begun to degrade, so the single coat you're contemplating will be required to seal the old surface, be the new surface protector, and look good. Too much for one coat to handle, especially over a darker color.
I'm assuming that since the pros you've sought out haven't suggested an elastomeric product, that your stucco is pristine with no cracking. I'm curious as to why not one would have suggested a second coat, when it's so unanimous here. I think that in these hard times that guys only price for the minimal to get the job, but all of them. Maybe it's a FL thing. I would choose the guy you like best, who impressed you the most, not who has the very best price. Hire him with the understanding that you may be looking to do a conditional second coat, and get a price on that. Do a sample section of one coat/two coat to see the extra bang you get for the buck. If price is a consideration, at least two coat the sides that take the brunt of the weather, you want that protection. The other sides just look pretty. As to which paint you choose, neither, IMO, will be better if only doing one coat, but either will be fine if doing two. I think there, in that situation, you'll be fine buying on price alone between those two.
Joe

2 looong paragraphs to tell him what I said in 4 words:laughing:


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