Ok Ric , Lets See If You Know - Painting - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-06-2012, 10:24 PM   #1
ltd
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 548
Rewards Points: 508
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


alright. i am lead certified and lead was banned in 1978.bla,bla,bla.my question for you guys is, generaling speaking when did they stop putting lead in paint . i know you are to assume any house older than 1978 could have lead in it .but in reality could you even buy residential paint in the sixties or the seventies with lead in it . just pondering

Advertisement

ltd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2012, 11:31 PM   #2
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


They sold lead powder on the shelves that painters themselves put in paint long after the mfgrs stopped.
Not totally sure about the years- but I know it continued into the 60's . When i started in 79 there were plenty of old guys grumbling about how paint without lead didn't perform like the old stuff..

Advertisement

__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Brushjockey For This Useful Post:
ltd (09-06-2012)
Old 09-06-2012, 11:57 PM   #3
ltd
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 548
Rewards Points: 508
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brush Jockey View Post
They sold lead powder on the shelves that painters themselves put in paint long after the mfg stopped.
Not totally sure about the years- but I know it continued into the 60's . When i started in 79 there were plenty of old guys grumbling about how paint without lead didn't perform like the old stuff..
instresting, i did not know about the lead powder sold to add to paint .my experience in the last couple years is that i have not found lead on walls in fifties sixties seventies homes ,now the trim that's another story. but yea i cant seem to find out when they stopped putting lead in paint. i guess paint manufacturers want that chapter to be left out.
ltd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2012, 12:10 AM   #4
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


Lead made colors last longer- gave a little flexibility to otherwise brittle oil finishes. thats why it was used primarily in enamels, not so much wall paints.
But if the paint is from WWII and before- probably all of it had it.
But the wall paints kind of sucked- so much of the walls were papered then.
it was later that that paper was stripped and walls painted, so later finished walls didn't have the lead so much, but the trim still did. After the mfgrs stopped putting lead in , it was kind of with a wink and a nod that it was available for the painters to put in. And at that time, most painters mixed their own colors on the job, so adding it was no big deal.
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2012, 10:36 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 432
Rewards Points: 254
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


Quote:
Originally Posted by ltd View Post
alright. i am lead certified and lead was banned in 1978.bla,bla,bla.my question for you guys is, generaling speaking when did they stop putting lead in paint . i know you are to assume any house older than 1978 could have lead in it .but in reality could you even buy residential paint in the sixties or the seventies with lead in it . just pondering
It's impossible to say when all companies quit using lead - but the law said lead could no longer be used in (architectural) paint after 1978. Sherwin Williams (at the time, the world's largest paint mfr), Valspar & Arco (I think it was Arco, might've been DuPont) all stopped using lead in architectural/consumer goods as early as the mid 50's - most other companies soon followed their actions. Ironically, these (and many other) companies, responsibly and voluntarily, stopped using lead as the dangers of lead in households started becoming known to consumers and industry alike.

I say "ironically" 'cause these responsible companies are the ones that have had to face down the parasitic lawyers in these ridiculous class-action lawsuits attempting to turn lead containing paints, and their evil manufacturers, into the newest tobacco-type feeding frenzy. When, in fact, there is no direct evidence linking lead poisoning of children to the exposure of lead containing paints. I mean, you gotta remember all the different household products and buiding materials that contained lead at the time - water lines (lead pipes)...gas lines (lead pipes)...conduit (lead)... GASOLINE (leaded)...and on and on. As a kid, I remember going to the hardware store and buying lead "bricks" - With my dad, we'd melt these bricks in a coffee can over a barbecue grill. Once liquid we'd pour them into casts for making lead weights and fishing lures. Exposure to lead came from so many sources prior to the 70's that, based on what consumer protection agencies tell us, I'm surprised any of us survived during that time period.

Anyway, some good things may have come from the tragedy of childhood lead poisoning...looking back, this may have been the time for consumer protection agencies, and right-to-know legislation, to take a valiant stance against unscrupulous and irresponsible manufacturers to forewarn consumers what they may be exposing themselves and their families to. Unfortunately, with all the good intent of these consumer groups and new legislation, all it seemed to really create was a new national attitude of blaming (in other words, suing) others for any problems or turmoil in one's life - with all the whores (sometimes call "tort lawyers") leading the way.
ric knows paint is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to ric knows paint For This Useful Post:
ltd (09-08-2012)
Old 09-07-2012, 11:36 AM   #6
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

ok ric , lets see if you know


http://www.lead.org.au/fs/fst29.html

The ban on lead in interior paints did not just sneak up one day. In fact bans by other countries had been in place for a long time before the US finally stepped in. And we have known the toxic nature of lead for thousands of years.

Add to this the fact that titanium was being introduced as a lead paint replacement as far back as the 40s and the likelihood of high end interior house finishes containing massive amounts of lead is probably pretty slim as the ban drew near. Companies would not have wanted to get stuck with inventory. Titanium was delivering brighter whites and color pigment bases.

But what of the layers under them in an old house or apartment building? It is there you find the highest concentrations. It is kids in poorly maintained inner city housing with a century of paint chips that have high levels of lead in the bloodstream. And that is scary. Because we always did know.

Lead paints were loved by painters for performance and by public housing, schools, hospitals, prisons etc. for durability. Painters did a lot to keep the ban from going into effect. When the disease fervor hit and people were convinced bacteria out to get them clung to ever square inch of walls and ceilings they stripped all the wallpaper off and had their places painted with paint that could be washed. Not much held up better than lead paint. I know to some the idea of washing all the walls each year sounds absurd but I remember it part of my grandmothers (both sides) spring cleaning routine.

Back in the day, people did not even think of painting their own places. Master painters loved working with lead based paints for their performance. They would show up with gallons of paint and tint them on the spot to the color the client wanted. Not until Benjamin Moore came up with the idea were their color jets to spit exact pigment amounts into cans. And lead paint was considered an appropriate industrial finish additive (still is for parking lot and road stripes, etc.). Painting toys and baby cribs was a valid industrial application.

Unfortunately we as consumers do not sort out fact from fiction so we have this current crazy idea all our children are going to chew the windowsills, breathe harmful VOCs from paint, and lick asbestos floors to the point they become more dull than they will with us tolerating them smoking joints from age 10 as a phase they are going through. It is absurdly funny.

Should lead be banned and carefully abated when found and plans are to disturb it? Absolutely. Should use of lead, mercury and other heavy metals that might enter our bloodstreams be regulated and/or monitored? Sure. Can we really say we don't or didn't know they were harmful. Come on.

You know another popular use of lead pigment through the 19th Century was in makeup. Before Coco Chanel got rip snortin drunk on a Riviera cruise and made tanning fashionable a tan was considered a trademark of the working class. Woman painted their faces and men powdered their hair to look whiter. Did they know the lead risks? Sure but fashion won over common sense. Just like tanning booths are.

Advertisement

user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts