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-   -   Oil vs. Water Based Primer (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/oil-vs-water-based-primer-130282/)

dzobrist 01-16-2012 08:39 PM

Oil vs. Water Based Primer
 
Folks, What is the difference between oil and water primer and how do you choose when to use which?

DrHicks 01-16-2012 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dzobrist (Post 825051)
Folks, What is the difference between oil and water primer and how do you choose when to use which?

In overly simplified terms, one is an oil carrier while the other is a water carrier.

Your choice of what kind of primer to use (there are more choices than just oil or latex) really depends entirely on what you need it to do.


So... What do you need it to do?

user1007 01-16-2012 10:31 PM

What you need to know and think about is has to do with the film you plan to leave behind.

Think about water and oil solvents as only the suspension for the film for a second. And think about everything you remember from junior high chemistry class. Oil and water do not mix well. Except in lava lamps made here in Chicago.

You can try to put an "oil" finish over latex but I promise it will not work. You can put latex or acrylic over oil and it might work. What you need is an equalizing film.

Alkyd. Or as mentioned and if you can afford them, some of the new primer film surfaces.

Alkyd used to be suspended only in stinky oil solvents. You can know get it in latex (soap and water cleanup products).

jschaben 01-16-2012 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dzobrist (Post 825051)
Folks, What is the difference between oil and water primer and how do you choose when to use which?

The good dr has a very good question. What are you doing?
I have been using oil based primer on plywood projects where I don't want the wood grain telegraphing through to the top coat. Water based primers seem to raise the grain enough it takes two or three coats of primer with sanding in between to achieve what I want where I can get the same effect with one coat of primer and a light sanding. :thumbsup:

DrHicks 01-16-2012 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 825207)
And think about everything you remember from junior high chemistry class.

That would be absolutely nothing except that a cute girl sat across the table from me...

user1007 01-16-2012 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jschaben (Post 825209)
The good dr has a very good question. What are you doing?
I have been using oil based primer on plywood projects where I don't want the wood grain telegraphing through to the top coat. Water based primers seem to raise the grain enough it takes two or three coats of primer with sanding in between to achieve what I want where I can get the same effect with one coat of primer and a light sanding. :thumbsup:

Great point but what are you doing? Seal the wood before priming if your concern is "telegraphing" wood grain to the surface. In all my years I have never found a need to apply more than one coat of primer. :no:

jschaben 01-16-2012 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 825221)
Great point but what are you doing? Seal the wood before priming if your concern is "telegraphing" wood grain to the surface. In all my years I have never found a need to apply more than one coat of primer. :no:

Could be that great plywood I've been getting from Home Depot, my local "real" lumber yard is even worse, construction grade stuff only. A heavier primer like Gripper may work better, haven't tried that yet but Cover Stain has been working well for me lately. I guess that's technically an Alkyd but it is oil borne.:)
I suppose I could use a sanding sealer, never really thought about that because primer is cheaper.

dzobrist 01-17-2012 02:17 PM

Oil V Water Primer use
 
I have two things I want to paint
1) Drywall
2) unfinished cabinets

Matthewt1970 01-17-2012 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dzobrist (Post 825825)
I have two things I want to paint
1) Drywall
2) unfinished cabinets

Prime your drywall with Latex. The unfinished cabinets will do better with an oil based primer.

Brushjockey 01-17-2012 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 (Post 826300)
Prime your drywall with Latex. The unfinished cabinets will do better with an oil based primer.

Best primer for raw wood in oil in my experience is BM's Enamel Underbody. Sands up like a dream.
Best Waterborne for me on raw is Zin's Primecoat2. Also sands up nice.
Only at HD I think.


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