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Old 07-11-2012, 06:15 PM   #1
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NKOTB with Painting 101 question


Hello all,

I am trying to find out if it is ideal, if not necessary, to use an oil based primer on AdvanTech sheathing before applying the oil based paint. The website for AdvanTech seems to say two different things about the need for primer. This is the flooring for my new shed and I want to make sure I do this right. We are using a Valspar premixed exterior paint that I have been told is appropriate for a floor cover. Any feedback would be valuable. Thanks!

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Old 07-11-2012, 11:01 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Q-ofalltrades View Post
Hello all,

I am trying to find out if it is ideal, if not necessary, to use an oil based primer on AdvanTech sheathing before applying the oil based paint. The website for AdvanTech seems to say two different things about the need for primer. This is the flooring for my new shed and I want to make sure I do this right. We are using a Valspar premixed exterior paint that I have been told is appropriate for a floor cover. Any feedback would be valuable. Thanks!
Hiya NK...

That's a good question you've posed here - and AdvanTech kinda adds to some of the confusion in their comments on finishing this sheathing. To answer your question properly, it's kinda necessary to know what is used as a water repellent for this engineered sheathing. AdvanTech doesn't identify the "sealer", but since the surface is water repellant, the water vehicle of an acrylic exterior paint would probably also be repelled unless an oil base be applied first as a sandwich, or tie-coat primer...

Since oil base products must penetrate to achieve proper adhesion, this suggests the "sealer" must be compatible with the resins and solvents of oil based primers and won't impede their ability to penetrate...it also suggests that neither silicones, nor penta type sealers were used. Most likely then, this sealer is made up of vegetable oil(s), (linseed, soy...probably tung - whatever), plus a little bit of wax - all of which should be compatible with oil primers.

Because this sheathing is being used as the floor for your shed, you could eliminate a step by just using an oil based floor enamel (both as prime and finish) and forget a separate primer and the acrylic top coat. In a 2 or 3 coat system, this will still provide good penetration and adhesion, plus be durable enough to withstand any traffic and abuse that the floor will be exposed to in a shed. Then, over time as the floor becomes scuffed, marred, scratched, etc. to repaint simply requires cleaning the floor, scuff sanding the surface and applying 1 or 2 additional coats of the same thing (or by that time use an acrylic if you want)...and by the way, unless you're gonna be doing a lot of moving of heavy equipment, or driving fork lifts over this floor, or exposing it to incidental hydraulic or brake fluid splashes, I'd not even consider epoxies or urethanes as a finish - not the right products for floors with normal amounts of traffic, nor for novice painters...

Sorry for the incessant rambling...I hope that kinda, sorta answered your question...let us know how you make out.


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Old 07-12-2012, 12:03 AM   #3
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Advantec was never intended to be used as a finished floor. I can just not see how paints going to stay stuck to it because of the coating applyed to it.
Even linolium glue will not stick to it.

You would be far better off going over the Advantec with a layer of subfloor rated plywood.
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Old 07-12-2012, 04:04 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Q-ofalltrades View Post
Hello all,

I am trying to find out if it is ideal, if not necessary, to use an oil based primer on AdvanTech sheathing before applying the oil based paint. The website for AdvanTech seems to say two different things about the need for primer. This is the flooring for my new shed and I want to make sure I do this right. We are using a Valspar premixed exterior paint that I have been told is appropriate for a floor cover. Any feedback would be valuable. Thanks!

Bad information
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:08 AM   #5
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NKOTB with Painting 101 question


Ric, do you know wives, too? :P Don't worry about being long winded with me. I value information and am always ready and willing to listen up when experience talks. Thanks for sharing your wisdom regarding the "How Stuff Works" aspect of paint and its characteristics- I am truly grateful!

Joe, I didn't realize AdvanTech had a more limited use. I live in South Georgia and termites are especially pesky. So, I was looking into best material to use with that in mind. My neighbor's son, who frames residentially, recommended AdvanTech for its ability to resist termites. I can't speak for him, but I was thinking the flooring would stand alone without any surface treatment. Then, my wife opined about having a nice painted floor for "her" shed! Hence, here I am! I'm thinking about calling AdvanTech to get some more info.


Chris, we had PLENTY of this five gallon bucket of Valspar Barn Paint left over from painting the shed (12x20 Gambrel with 11 ft rise), so we decided to try using it, especially since we are tapped out financially from this build. My wife spoke to the Lowe's rep about using the paint for floor cover. This is all third person knowledge for me, but my wife states he said it would probably do ok since it is a durable paint to start with. My guess is that the rep was trying to be understanding with regards to to my wife's hesitance to spend yet more money on this project. I think I agree with you, Chris. You know the old saying though- if mama ain't happy, ain't nobody happy!


After all your great input, my wife rolled the floor with the barn paint. Keeping our fingers crossed. Thanks for the responses, folks! I'll let you know how the floor holds up!


This was my first project. Not too shabby, considering. I know a lot about what not to do now! If I can figure out how to, I'll post some pics. Thanks again, guys!
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:09 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Q-ofalltrades View Post
Ric, do you know wives, too? :P Don't worry about being long winded with me. I value information and am always ready and willing to listen up when experience talks. Thanks for sharing your wisdom regarding the "How Stuff Works" aspect of paint and its characteristics- I am truly grateful!

Joe, I didn't realize AdvanTech had a more limited use. I live in South Georgia and termites are especially pesky. So, I was looking into best material to use with that in mind. My neighbor's son, who frames residentially, recommended AdvanTech for its ability to resist termites. I can't speak for him, but I was thinking the flooring would stand alone without any surface treatment. Then, my wife opined about having a nice painted floor for "her" shed! Hence, here I am! I'm thinking about calling AdvanTech to get some more info.


Chris, we had PLENTY of this five gallon bucket of Valspar Barn Paint left over from painting the shed (12x20 Gambrel with 11 ft rise), so we decided to try using it, especially since we are tapped out financially from this build. My wife spoke to the Lowe's rep about using the paint for floor cover. This is all third person knowledge for me, but my wife states he said it would probably do ok since it is a durable paint to start with. My guess is that the rep was trying to be understanding with regards to to my wife's hesitance to spend yet more money on this project. I think I agree with you, Chris. You know the old saying though- if mama ain't happy, ain't nobody happy!


After all your great input, my wife rolled the floor with the barn paint. Keeping our fingers crossed. Thanks for the responses, folks! I'll let you know how the floor holds up!


This was my first project. Not too shabby, considering. I know a lot about what not to do now! If I can figure out how to, I'll post some pics. Thanks again, guys!

what else would he say?

It will look fine until there is any traffic on it, then you will be wondering how to remove it and do it properly. Oh well, mother knows best
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Old 07-12-2012, 08:48 PM   #7
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Advantec is great stuff but is no more resistant to termites then any other subfloor that could have been used.
It's claim to fame is it's moisture resistant so it holds up better if it gets wet while the house is being built and is less likly to be effected from moisture rising from below.

Sure sounds like she getting some really bad info from everyone she talks to.
That paints not even close to what would be used on a floor. Only way it would work is if everyone takes off the shoes, and never drags anthing over it.

If you have a paint question, you go to a real paint store and ask the question.

If your that concered about preventing termites, then there should have been a pretreatmant done on the foundation as it was being built.
Never fall for that silly "bait station" scam. It's a lazy mans way to make a quick buck. Explain to me how a narrow plastic tube with some "bait" that's out in the yard behond the drip line of the house every 10' is going to even be found by a blind insect, never mind how is that going to protect the foundation where they most often gain entry.

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Old 07-12-2012, 09:40 PM   #8
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The sun didn't fall today because she painted the floor with it, but I'm keeping a close eye on the moon tonite! I'm wondering if the floor even needs a finished surface, 'cause I'll be happy to just sweep the chips away. I'm guessing that, ideally, I would strip this stuff off the floor and use a more appropriate oil based enamel before I start using the shed. I'll have to convince my wife to take a solo vacation so I can do this thing right! Otherwise, she will be a screaming banshee hanging around my neck trying to prevent me from fixing it. There are other things on the honey-do list, you know. :'(
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Old 07-12-2012, 09:48 PM   #9
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What makes a floor enamel different than its wall counterpart?
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Old 07-13-2012, 04:44 AM   #10
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http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/f...2&advs=0&tab=2


what makes the difference? I have no idea but Rick will most likely give us a dissertation on the subject, at least I hope so
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Old 07-14-2012, 10:20 AM   #11
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What makes a floor enamel different than its wall counterpart?
hmm...The easy answer to your question would be a tougher, more durable resin is used for floor finishes, while a softer, more pliable resin would be relegated to wall finishes. Unfortunately, that's not entirely true.

Truth is, many times the same (type/category) of resin is used for both applications - although you'd never want to use a wall paint on floors (floor paint on walls would be fine, though). Probably more often than not (and this differs from manufacturer to manufacturer), resins used for floors have been "modified" with specialty resins, such as epoxies and urethanes, to improve a coatings ability to resist scuffs, marring and wear...while these same "modifications" may produce less-than-desired results when used in wall paints (at least to the same levels as floor paints) - some of these results may be undesirable sheen levels, application and recoat difficulties, and higher cost (without necessarily adding a correlative benefit)...

Sometimes though it isn't only what the resin is modified with that creates a more durable finish, it's as much as what's not been used to modify the resin with (sounds confusing, huh?)...The resin is the guts of any coating. It is the glue that holds all the components to the wall (or surface), it is primarily what gives the finish it's specific integrity - So anything you add to this blend of components that make up paint that isn't resin (and, again, epoxies and urethanes are examples of other types of resins), actually then would take away from the resin's ability to perform in a specific way. Which kinda brings to wall paints - Manufacturers use all types of components and additives to create wall paints that will perform to a satisfactory level for even the most novice of painters...Rheology modifiers to improve flow, leveling, and an ability to cling to vertical surfaces w/o runs or sags, components that limit the amount of spatter, inexpensive filler pigments to provide film build and also serve to limit the distance a coating can be spread, and many other PITA components to affect application characteristics of a wall paint, will all ultimately diminish a resin's protective properties.

From that perspective, consider that floor paints really don't require a no-spatter element, nor does it need to be stroked to accommodate vertical applications. Generally speaking (very generally), floor paints also really don't need a lot of filler pigments (relative to wall coatings) to provide a necessary film build - so the elimination of the particular components give the resin a greater ability to provide greater protection to a surface.

And, finally - the ratio of resin to all other components in a gallon of paint, in most cases is gonna be a little higher in floor paints than in it's wall paint counterparts for close to a billion reasons, but that difference in ratio results in a tougher, more durable finish, in a similar film build, to provide the type of protection required from a floor finish...

There is no way this was intended to be a complete or definitive answer to your question, but essentially the differences between a floor and wall paint can be summarized by saying the resins in floor paints are often (a) strengthened by modification, (b) less degraded from adding less "fluff" components, and (c) are used at a higher ratio to all other components.

I must go rest now, all this typing has exhausted my fingertips...
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Old 07-14-2012, 05:26 PM   #12
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[quote=ric knows paint;965455]hmm...The easy answer to your question would be a tougher, more durable resin is used for floor finishes, while a softer, more pliable resin would be relegated to wall finishes. Unfortunately, that's not entirely true.

Truth is, many times the same (type/category) of resin is used for both applications - although you'd never want to use a wall paint on floors (floor paint on walls would be fine, though). Probably more often than not (and this differs from manufacturer to manufacturer), resins used for floors have been "modified" with specialty resins, such as epoxies and urethanes, to improve a coatings ability to resist scuffs, marring and wear...while these same "modifications" may produce less-than-desired results when used in wall paints (at least to the same levels as floor paints) - some of these results may be undesirable sheen levels, application and recoat difficulties, and higher cost (without necessarily adding a correlative benefit)...

Sometimes though it isn't only what the resin is modified with that creates a more durable finish, it's as much as what's not been used to modify the resin with (sounds confusing, huh?)...The resin is the guts of any coating. It is the glue that holds all the components to the wall (or surface), it is primarily what gives the finish it's specific integrity - So anything you add to this blend of components that make up paint that isn't resin (and, again, epoxies and urethanes are examples of other types of resins), actually then would take away from the resin's ability to perform in a specific way. Which kinda brings to wall paints - Manufacturers use all types of components and additives to create wall paints that will perform to a satisfactory level for even the most novice of painters...Rheology modifiers to improve flow, leveling, and an ability to cling to vertical surfaces w/o runs or sags, components that limit the amount of spatter, inexpensive filler pigments to provide film build and also serve to limit the distance a coating can be spread, and many other PITA components to affect application characteristics of a wall paint, will all ultimately diminish a resin's protective properties.

From that perspective, consider that floor paints really don't require a no-spatter element, nor does it need to be stroked to accommodate vertical applications. Generally speaking (very generally), floor paints also really don't need a lot of filler pigments (relative to wall coatings) to provide a necessary film build - so the elimination of the particular components give the resin a greater ability to provide greater protection to a surface.

And, finally - the ratio of resin to all other components in a gallon of paint, in most cases is gonna be a little higher in floor paints than in it's wall paint counterparts for close to a billion reasons, but that difference in ratio results in a tougher, more durable finish, in a similar film build, to provide the type of protection required from a floor finish...

There is no way this was intended to be a complete or definitive answer to your question, but essentially the differences between a floor and wall paint can be summarized by saying the resins in floor paints are often (a) strengthened by modification, (b) less degraded from adding less "fluff" components, and (c) are used at a higher ratio to all other components.

I must go rest now, all this typing has exhausted my fingertips...[/quote]


I believe it, but good answer

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