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titan7 11-30-2011 02:57 PM

New found respect for painters
 
So I have painted my entire house (inside) 12 years ago, pretty easy (all white). So I figured how hard would it be to paint the walls tan and ceilings white again, easy! Well rolling flat on the ceilings was, cutting in a different color on walls with heavy knockdown is a Freaking PITA!!!!!!!! Cut in one 10 foot wall and it took me half an hour+ to get the first cut in down, the second went faster. now I am facing a two 30 foot 8-12" high vauted walls!!! and the stairs, which I will need to purchase ladders for. Oh why did I do heavy knockdown. I am about ready to call in a pro at this point. This will end up taking me a week to finish at night after work. Any faster way? I don't think tape will work as the knockdown is too heavy.

chrisn 11-30-2011 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by titan7 (Post 782428)
So I have painted my entire house (inside) 12 years ago, pretty easy (all white). So I figured how hard would it be to paint the walls tan and ceilings white again, easy! Well rolling flat on the ceilings was, cutting in a different color on walls with heavy knockdown is a Freaking PITA!!!!!!!! Cut in one 10 foot wall and it took me half an hour+ to get the first cut in down, the second went faster. now I am facing a two 30 foot 8-12" high vauted walls!!! and the stairs, which I will need to purchase ladders for. Oh why did I do heavy knockdown. I am about ready to call in a pro at this point. This will end up taking me a week to finish at night after work. Any faster way? I don't think tape will work as the knockdown is too heavy.

you close to Maryland?:whistling2:

jsheridan 11-30-2011 04:41 PM

:biggrin: I'm speechless.
That's refreshing to hear. Just yesterday, the heating service guy came to the house. Got to talking about painting. Told me he just had his living room done, as he's shaking his head disappointingly. Recognizing what I see in countless shaken down consumers, I imply that he didn't get a good job, huh. Nah, and for the price he paid he says, he shouldn't be disappointed. The price--a case of beer, a couple of guys. Seems a couple of his "friends" apparently hack away by day and hacked his place up over a weekend. I couldn't even continue the conversation to find if he was disappointed because he thought a case is a good price or he should have known better. All I could think was how far this trade has fallen from the respect it once had. It's a disgusting shame. Thanks Titan.
Joe

chrisn 11-30-2011 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsheridan (Post 782530)
:biggrin: I'm speechless.
That's refreshing to hear. Just yesterday, the heating service guy came to the house. Got to talking about painting. Told me he just had his living room done, as he's shaking his head disappointingly. Recognizing what I see in countless shaken down consumers, I imply that he didn't get a good job, huh. Nah, and for the price he paid he says, he shouldn't be disappointed. , a couple of guys. Seems a couple of his "friends" apparently hack away by day and hacked his place up over a weekend. I couldn't even continue the conversation to find if he was disappointed because he thought a case is a good price or he should have known better. All I could think was how far this trade has fallen from the respect it once had. It's a disgusting shame. Thanks Titan.
Joe

You got that right, a case of beer:mad:, serves him right, probably PBR's to boot.:laughing:

jsheridan 11-30-2011 04:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 782502)
you close to Maryland?:whistling2:

NO, he has knockdown texture. He's from a far away place, a place from another time, where texture reigns. They've yet to reach the refinement that smooth walls symbolize. :laughing:

Titan, there are smooth walled regions of the country and textured walled regions. The mid-atlantic/northeast region is generally a smooth region. I rarely enounter texture, and hate it when I do. I'm an anti-texturite. It's a topic of discussion here from time to time.

jsheridan 11-30-2011 04:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 782541)
You got that right, a case of beer:mad:, serves him right, probably PBR's to boot.:laughing:

I thought possibly Girls (Coors) Lite. PBR 16's was our beer of choice during the teenage years.

Gymschu 11-30-2011 05:47 PM

It is amazing the level of skill required for a good paint job. I often think of the lost skills of cutting in, proper rolling technique, brushing out a piece of woodwork.....etc. Add to that, a painter often has to have some carpentry, electrical, and other handyman experience to properly prep walls and ceilings for paint. Then you have to have ability to climb ladders and to get on your hands and knees to cut in around baseboards, etc. There really is a whole skill set need to be a quality painter.......until someone tries it themselves, I think they have the impression that painting is indeed a job that can be done on a weekend paid in beer!

ltd 11-30-2011 06:01 PM

thanks titan7:) i paint a lot of texture walls. i kind of like it ,its very forgiving as far as touch up,hat banding,wet edge, bla bla bla. anywho i'm surprised at the top of ceiling the plasters didn't give you a half inch of smooth plaster to make your cuts easy. two things might help you ,thin your paint with a little walter. the thinner paint will flow into the little nooks and crannies:huh: better .then when your doing your ceiling cut kind of shake or vibrate your brush ,this will get paint to flow into the nooks and crannies:huh:

joecaption 11-30-2011 06:09 PM

That's why most painters drink to much. In the morning there hands shake and it's time to cut in.
The trick is to use a top quaility brush like a Purdy or Wooster brand brush. It holds more paint and leave less brush marks.

jsheridan 11-30-2011 06:24 PM

Gymschu, you're right, there's a lot to being a quality painter. For such a simple, supposedly brainless occupation, we need to have some basic understanding of very complex subjects, like chemistry, light, color, etc. In doing quality exterior work, beyond just knowing when it's raining, I've had to learn a bit about weather, how the elements attack exteriors, understanding moisture, etc. I sometimes have to think and devise ways to alter faulty structure designs to protect the painted surface, the old hip bone connected to the leg bone story. I have a good customer whose wood siding was suffering damage from an improperly installed half round gutter. The rain runoff was going behind the gutter and down the siding, damaging it and coating the ground area siding with mud, also damaging the paint finish. I devised, fashioned, and installed a custom aluminum flashing to close the gap and direct the water into the gutter. That was a valuable service to the customer, a nice add on for me, and the result was a problem solved. I always try to solve the problem that's causing the failure, rather than just painting over it. Doesn't make me better, just different. Most guys wouldn't look that deep. "Just paint it", "stop thinking", was what I always heard, just paint it. Doing quality work does require a lot of thought and effort.

titan7 11-30-2011 06:50 PM

thanks for the tips, I only use Purdy brushes and Dunn Edwards Suprema paint, I am cutting in with a 1" purdy angle brush as try to elinate "ALL' brush marks. In the past I would use a 4" roller and go over the cut at the same time, however with the amount of time it took me to cut this line I was afraid the paint was already too dry to do that or even roll the wall out.

I was only able to cut the window returns and the top and sides of the wall, tonight I will roll the wall out for coat #1. At this pace I will be doing this for a week.

My bigger concern is doing this at the peak of he 12" vaulted ceiling, it was hard enough on a step stool.

I will try thinning the paint just a tiny bit.

BTW, I am in So. CA where knockdown is king.

Brushjockey 11-30-2011 07:08 PM

I think part of your problem is the 1" brush. Use at least a 2.5.
Make a generous long swath JUST below the ceiling line with a loaded brush- this supplies the material-
Then without reloading redo that stroke using only a couple of the tip bristles pushing just enough paint to make the line - steady and smooth stroke. Be aware of your breath. Yes- it is yoga!!

Takes a bit of practice- but this is the method.
Usually with a 2 coat app I will not even make the first round exact- first one gets coverage- second brings 'er home.

ltd 11-30-2011 07:12 PM

titan a 1 inch brush:huh: i think that's the biggest problem:yes:,try a 2 1/2 purdy angle you will have more control . imho

joecaption 11-30-2011 07:51 PM

I agree 100% 1" is way to small.

titan7 12-01-2011 12:47 AM

Thx I will try my purdy 2.5 inch brush.


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