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Old 10-29-2012, 05:43 PM   #1
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


Hi and thanks for any input.

We are ripping out all baseboards, molding, doors, and replacing with all new boards and 1 3/4" solid doors.

Not a problem so far but here is where the argument comes in:

Do we ..

Have a painter spray them all ahead of time then install

or

Have a painter use the brush/roll method onsite

To me the pro's to spraying is the smooth finish, the pros to brush/roll is being able to touch up as needed and blend in down the road.

Is it safe to assume a good painter can brush/roll almost or as good as a spray gun?

Sounds like a small problem to have but when you think about all the work in general it becomes a pretty big decision.

I'de appreciate any feedback with regards to if one way is better than the other or if I am splitting hairs here in terms of the final product.

Have a good one.

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Old 10-29-2012, 06:07 PM   #2
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


You pose interesting questions and the answers depend on your expectations. Paint manufacturers do not put brush marks in their cans. This is an application issue and smoothness depends on the painter's skill level. At best, there may still be brush-marks in the film.

Spray-applied finishes in the field will produce a smooth finish, however this also depends on operator skill and chosen equipment. Bench priming and one sprayed coat of finish is recommended, then installation, patching and spot-priming and then a full spray coat will give you a glass-smooth job. Of course, someone has to pay for all this and guess who that someone is?

Make sure you decide on a high-quality paint that produces good results and has a good flow and self-leveling properties.

You may ask the painter to do a piece of trim, using his best brushing method; then you can make an informed decision.

Good luck with your project!

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Old 10-29-2012, 06:15 PM   #3
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


First off, are you staining and clear coating this new wood or priming and painting? In any event, especially with soft woods, you have to seal it. You can use a clear sealer/conditioner if you plan is to stain or paint. You can also use a sealer/primer if you plan to paint.

Stains are best applied by hand in my opinion. I guess you could chase behind someone spraying on stain but I don't see any major time savings.

As for primers, paints and poly or varnishes? I don't see that you have to choose exclusively between spraying or roller and brush. If your painter has the room and equipment to spray offsite I would think about at least getting the primer coat on everything. The problem with finishing everything is you are going to ding it careful as you may be or at the very least you will be putting nail holes in the trim. Maybe finish on site?

A company I know of that does extremely high end kitchen cabinetry delivers all the cabinets stained or primed but insists the finish coats be done after installation and onsite.

A good painter, using good tools and quality materials can certainly come close to a spray finish. However, I should think spray finishing the doors ahead of time could save you some money. Just wrap them in some protection I guess.

Kind of a wishy washy answer when I read it but I don't think there is one answer to recommend. If by spraying you mean the painter is a hack and going to knock these out with a $29 Wagner thing, I would steer clear. If he shows up with a bag of 20 brushes retailing for $10 I would hide too.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:22 PM   #4
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


As you can see by my name... I might be biased! lol
Lots of variables. First- if someone was to spray off, do you have a place to make a good shop to do this? It does take quite a bit of room.
If sprayed on, everything that isn't to be painted after needs to be very completely covered- always difficult if you are living in the house.
You are right on the money about the trade off between glass finish ( if they are capable of doing that- not easy) and touch up.
I ( back to that biased part) like, particularly in occupied homes, to do it all by hand after installation. Then you can fill/caulk prep looking at its "final resting place"- all damage has been done.
Then it comes down to how good the painters are, and how good the material is, in that order.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:08 PM   #5
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


If you are painting the trim and are unable to get the door casings, mouldings, and baseboards factory primed then you should definitely have your painter do that off site if they have the space for it. Another thing to factor in is that a lot of paint grade finger jointed mouldings can come 16ft long. This has its pros and its cons, so just make sure that whatever you have sprayed off site can be safely transported to your house. It won't do any good to spray a bunch of 16ft trim and doors if your painter drives a Ford Ranger with a jobsite toolbox bolted in the back, etc.

With your woodwork primed you can then get everything properly installed. Walls are imperfect, some a lot worse than others, so if you want a top knotch seamless paint job you'll want to caulk everything in nice and tight after the installation is completed. Once the caulking is cured you're ready to brush on your topcoat. If your painter is familiar with Sherwin Williams Pro Classic (acrylic latex enamel if you're living in the house) then that's an option that I've found works really well. There is a bit of a learning curve to using this, and as one of the other guys already said, you'll want to have your painter finish a test piece prior to starting your project so that you can get a good guage of what to realistically expect.

As for the doors I'd definitely have those sprayed, depending on how many doors you're needing to have painted. If your painter has a means of transporting them from his shop to your house safely then go for it. If not, he might be able to plastic off a portion of your garage, or unfinished basement, and spray them on site without filling your living space with fumes and overspray.

Good luck with your project.
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Old 10-30-2012, 07:32 PM   #6
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


Thanks for all the info .. tougher than I thought it would be to pick how to move forward here.

One company wants to take all the doors and molding, prime and spray offsite at their shop where they have a paintbooth, then bring it all over and install and touchup as needed.. the doors come preprimed but as you know, that pre primed coat is not acceptable to paint on ...

The other company, also highly recommended, wants to brush everything onsite and only brush the doors after they are hung ..

Pricing is about the same which is the worst part because niether has made it any easier to pick the way to go ...

My only concern is the spray offsite guy is well known in the county for doors and moldings so I assume he is using high quality equipment.

The problem with the other guy is you really dont know if you have a good brush painter until the job is done ..

Seems like the spray guy gives me the least amount of unknowns in terms of final quality ...
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Old 10-30-2012, 08:48 PM   #7
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


Personally I don't know how you can install prefinished wood, fill the nail holes, caulk all the components and only do touch up. IMO it would need a full coat on to do it right, which means the last coat ( except for doors) would be a brush coat anyway.
Something to think about.
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Old 10-31-2012, 03:59 AM   #8
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New doors, baseboards, molding..


I agree with ^^

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