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Patty00 04-18-2009 10:12 AM

New Barn -T1-11 Paint or Solid Stain?
 
I have a new barn with t1-11 siding. I am leaning to using a solid based stain? Should I be painting instead? Of course, barn red would be the color.

We live in northwest washington state.

So, two questions.

1. Paint or Stain?

2. What is the best product I can use? Benjamin Moore? Sherwin Williams?

Thanks for suggestions.

Matthewt1970 04-18-2009 11:22 AM

If it's the pre-primed stuff, then stain is out. If it isn't, then I would go with some Sikkens stain.

poppameth 04-18-2009 12:08 PM

I'd use an acrylic solid stain like Sikkens Rubbol Siding Finish. I've seen far too many failures when people try to use oil on T1-11.

Matthewt1970 04-18-2009 02:39 PM

The word Latex has no business being used with stain. However, T1-11 will take paint real well. The rough texture holds the paint.

poppameth 04-19-2009 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 (Post 261923)
The word Latex has no business being used with stain. However, T1-11 will take paint real well. The rough texture holds the paint.

You might want to use the product and see the results before you knock it. The Rubbol acrylic far outperformed the oil, to the point Sikkens completely dropped the oil because so few people still used it. I've seldom ever seen a problem with Flood latex stains either. We sell a lot of both and so far Zero complaints on the performance of either product. Flood does tend to chalk though due to the emulsabond in it.

Matthewt1970 04-19-2009 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by poppameth (Post 262288)
You might want to use the product and see the results before you knock it. The Rubbol acrylic far outperformed the oil, to the point Sikkens completely dropped the oil because so few people still used it. I've seldom ever seen a problem with Flood latex stains either. We sell a lot of both and so far Zero complaints on the performance of either product. Flood does tend to chalk though due to the emulsabond in it.

Sikkens still makes plenty of oil based stains. I have used latex stain before and the first time we did it we had to go back 3 months later and fix the peeling. There are also plenty of stories I have heard from people around here and all over the net of latex stain peeling. I don't know how many times I have to say this, but STAIN SHOULD NOT PEEL. The Rebbol you refer to is an Alkyd/Acrylic Hybrid which while it is water reduceable, it is hardly latex by definition. BTW, I have never seen emulsabong cause clalking.

jaros bros. 04-19-2009 12:43 PM

I wouldn't go with paint. Stain will be absorbed better and hold up better than paint. If it was preprimed, I'd go with paint. Gotta seal it all or the paint will pop off after a few years even with the rough wood, especially if you have high humidity.

poppameth 04-19-2009 01:56 PM

Yes the siding product is a hybrid. About 1-2% is alkyd content according to their tech department.
Flood's PDS sheets for Emulsabond spec use in the prime coat only and not in the top coat specifically because it can cause chalking.

I use to agree that oil was better for the most part. I just can't force myself to believe it any longer. They've taken so much out of the oil products that made them good to begin with. You are left with a high solids product with very little binder. It just doesn't penetrate like it use to.

Tim Barnes 05-29-2009 08:29 AM

Barn Painting
 
Stain is great if you like that look. Just remember that stain lasts approx. 3-5 years then you must do it again. Paint will last much longer with even better protection. Also, you can use paint that looks like the color of stains if you want the "stain look" with using paints. I would highly recommend Sherwin Williams paint. Good luck!

housepaintingny 07-25-2009 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 (Post 261923)
The word Latex has no business being used with stain. However, T1-11 will take paint real well. The rough texture holds the paint.


Some stains are acrylic-waterborne. Now days alot of acrylics are better than old fashioned oil, 100% acrylics retain color better, are more fade ressitant, mildew ressistant, & more flexible, less cracking

housepaintingny 07-25-2009 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Patty00 (Post 261837)
I have a new barn with t1-11 siding. I am leaning to using a solid based stain? Should I be painting instead? Of course, barn red would be the color.

We live in northwest washington state.

So, two questions.

1. Paint or Stain?

2. What is the best product I can use? Benjamin Moore? Sherwin Williams?

Thanks for suggestions.


Hi,
I am a painting contractor in NY. I would apply to coats of cabot solid acrylic stain to the t-11 siding. If you used paint you would have to apply one coat of primer and shpuld apply two top coats of an 100% acrylic paint, such as super paint from sherwin williams. We use cabot and sikkens stains alot. Cabot siding stain is made for wood siding and will work great for years to come.

4ThGeneration 07-25-2009 06:34 PM

Just one scenario:

Give the wood a light cleaning of say Simple Cherry and some chlorine.
In a 5 gallon bucket use 3.5 Gallons of chlorine (Freshest they have)
I use 10 OZ of Simple Cherry and add no water because I downstream and the water will be added anyhow. This will remove any dirt, grease and such to make sure you have a clean surface.


When dry caulk up every joint using Benjamin Moore Moorlastic caulk. Also, caulk where the t-111 meets the foundation block. You have to get on your knees to do this usually, but it helps big time.

I would say you need to use a high build exterior latex primer. When you do this you cant use the crappy HD small electric rigs or a wagner. You have to get a pump large enough to be able to handle a paint that has like 70% solids and 30%water. Its the total reverse of reg paint. Also make sure it is breathable. This will help the moisture not be trapped in while nothing being able to penetrate inward. When you spray make sure you use a 1 1/4 inch nap to back roll as this will push the paint into the grooves and soak in better instead of just laying on top.


On this step I would say to use Benjamin Moores Aura Exterior paint in a satin finish for the body. Trim to me always looks better in a Semi Gloss to give it pop.


Then again, I can write an whole book on this subject, but too much can be overload.

If you need more specific advice then contact me on here or my email. colonial-powerwashingandpainting2comcast.net

I lived in Florida which is a very harsh climate for exterior homes with all the mold, moisture, humidity, bugs and salt air.

housepaintingny 07-25-2009 08:18 PM

When cleaning the siding bleach and chlorine are damageing to the wood, contrary to what some say bleach will kill mold and mildew spores. You should use a product such as tsp, and a pressure washer if ones available, otherwise a garden hose will work. If you are going to be spraying the solid stain onto the t11 use an airless sprayer that will spray at least .23 gallons a minute, with a tip that has a 15-17 orfice. The tip size will also depend on the sprayer output, but a sprayer that pushes at least .23 gallons a minute will take a 15 tip. A good tip to use is a 415 or 515 the first number gets doubled and that's how wide of a fan it will spray and the second number is the orfice size. A 15-17 is reccomended for acrylics. We guarantee all of our work in writing and have never had a problem using an acrylic solid stain or any other products that we use. A lot of our work is sprayed, I have probally sprayed over 200 gallons in the past 5 weeks already.

4ThGeneration 07-25-2009 08:58 PM

Be careful of TSP. That stuff will etch your glass if you are not careful and please use a professional power washing machine. The higher the GPM of water flow the better. Its not about blasting your siding to bits. Simple cherry is a fine product that bonds with chlorine. The higher GPM allows you to wash faster as well as the rinsing agents that are in simple cherry allow for a clean rinse. Many, many many professional Power Washing Contractors use this method.

housepaintingny 07-25-2009 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4ThGeneration (Post 306714)
Be careful of TSP. That stuff will etch your glass if you are not careful and please use a professional power washing machine. The higher the GPM of water flow the better. Its not about blasting your siding to bits. Simple cherry is a fine product that bonds with chlorine. The higher GPM allows you to wash faster as well as the rinsing agents that are in simple cherry allow for a clean rinse. Many, many many professional Power Washing Contractors use this method.

You have to dilute the tsp with water, we have used liquid tsp for years and have never had a problem with using it, nor have we seen it etch glass. You don't let the tsp dry onto the surface, its applyed then scrubbed with a brush if neccessary and rinsed off. I would not apply tsp to glass, that's not what its for, its a sodium percobonate, which gently cleans dirt and mildew from the surface.


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