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Old 08-31-2010, 10:37 AM   #1
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


A craftsman made a maple 4 poster fo me - but turns out he used pieces and glued post together - so can't stain as it will be different colour -stripes. I am going to try to paint it - and have read on this site about lacquer giving prof finish. Never done it? Does it need a sprayer - is that expensive to buy? Any quick tips re props needed. Am I brave or foolish to try? Kingsize bed ...?
Help needed quickly -hoped to do this by Friday.
thanks for advice.
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Old 08-31-2010, 03:11 PM   #2
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


If you can locate a strore that sells the pressurized devices (aresol can \ compressed air ) that is used in conjunction with a delivery system, tinted or colored lacquer or other finish would be a good resolve. I have brushed these types of finishes - usually using varinsh as I was working on antiques, but have seen where the home aresol variety is around. test it out and - DO NOT RUSH as this will only cost you more time and money. Also - check into the reviews on whatever product you find. Hate to see anyone waste money and get ticked off at the same time. If you go the brushing route, Shell out the bucks for a high quality brush, you won't regret it. And keep it cleaned out when done. Also - make sure you use a tinted or colored finish with a fairly long drying or working time. People often end up fiddling around trying to get it perfect first time and that only makes it worse. Figure on sealing the piece first with a sealer compatable with your finish. 0000 steel wool and or 320 grit sand paper between coatings & tack clothes. Keep the dust down. There is a product - aresol lacquer called Deft. Don't know if you'll find it in dark enough tints - but - it could be a great final coating to smoothe everything out -ie brush strokes and a lite sanding after your final coat of color. Good luck - and tell me how it comes out. Hope this was of some help.

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Old 08-31-2010, 03:36 PM   #3
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


Thanks very much for your quick reply - but still not clear what you mean by aerosol in conjunction with a delivery system...you see you are talking to a complete neophyte. No clue but pretty handy usually. I understoond from previous other people chats that I would need to use lacquer - but can you apply lacquer with a brush? I want a dark green - hoping for an austrian or gustavian antique type of finish....?
Thanks again
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Old 09-03-2010, 08:09 AM   #4
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


I had just written a VERY long detailed account of how to apply lacquer and included links to 2 sites that would be helpful when the DIY site lost me. I AM SLIGHTLY PEEVED right now as i did give a very thorough account of how too. http://www.refinishfurniture.com/deft_lacquer.htm

This is one of the links - I will try again later - It was a VERY long letter
With frustration,
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Old 09-03-2010, 02:46 PM   #5
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


Brushing lacquer is actually a fairly easy process. As with anything, the proper tools and the proper equipment\tools are essential to the quality of the end product. Brushes - You nreally should have a variety of these and don't skimp. Buy high quality or trust me, you will get what you paid for. The shapes of the project dictate the types you will need. For example a round turning with curves alternating from concave to convex surfaces is most likely to warrant a round brush. 3/4 inch can be used with many turning profiles, but - if turnings are finer - or more closely spaced (I'm referring to the distance between convex points) then you may want to use an even smaller diameter. Remember, you want to coat this piece with color as evenly as possible. Also - You will note that most lacquers for brushing are slow to dry which is to your advantage. However, you do not have all day so - get the lacquer onto the wood as quickley and evenly as possible. working a small area at a time - say 12" of a turning- then "Lay off" - or gently and with uniform pressure perform brush strokes around the turning picking up or spreading out any uneven application of the lacquer. After you bring the bristles away from the wood, note if there is any excess on the bristles. If so, when you look at the area you've just done, if there is a small void or "holiday" as it is called, you can simply use that excess already on the bristles to touch up with a gentle stroke. Most importantly, don't try to get it perfect on the first coat. This part of the letter is mainly dealing with how to and what "equipment" to use. One other thing that you may wish to do - if you have any large flat areas ie: head or foot boards, you can use a roller, preferably mowhair or some synthetic thats passing itself off as a mohair equivelent. This will allow for getting the lacquer onto the wood (always the most time consuming part of any non spray application)in a quick and efficient manner. Then merely Lay off - or use even firm and consistent strokes. Note - do edges before flat areas and watch when bringing the roller or brush close to any edge as you can quite easily form a drip or bead. If you do - a quick wipe with the finger and move on.

I will sedn this now as last time i tried to writ this much i was foiled by some gremlins.
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Old 09-03-2010, 03:02 PM   #6
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I'll start with this link http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_bas..._lacquers.html
I am sorry to have split all of this up - but nonetheless - here it is. Coloring lacquer is again a matter of preference. As I stated earlier, my experience has been with varnishes and antiques. You will be able to glean information from this site that pretty much lays it out there. One thing I would pursue however is this - Lacquers other than gloss have solids which create their sheen, be it satin, semi-gloss and so on. I would thing that the most easily colored lacquers are without solids. You would still need to stir throughout use - but probably not as much. If your desired end product is to have a Satin or even Matte finish, you can simple buy a can or 2 of Deft spray lacquer (which by the way is pretty much idiot proof lacquer) in the desired finish and top coat the piece. Remember it is always good to use a 320 or 400 sandpaper and or 0000 steel wool and clean off the piece with tack clothes prior to recoating.

There is so much more that can be said about these processes - but this should get you on the way and hopefully result in a good job.
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Old 09-06-2010, 02:00 PM   #7
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Thank you so much for this very helpful information. Sorry so long in acknowledging - (son's 21st party in interim). I am printing out your instructions and will follow in detail - taking them to our local diy shop. It will take me a couple of weeks - thanks again very very much.
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Old 09-08-2010, 08:52 AM   #8
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never painted a turned 4-poster bed before


Just a note to say you're welcome. I feel confident you'll do a fine job. Wish I had more experience in the product end of your situation, but I feel I have steered you in the right direction. Any other questions arise - feel free to contact me here or @ yahoo - I added my chat name to my profile.

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