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Old 07-30-2009, 10:22 AM   #1
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Hi my name is Jason. My mom just recently bought a house in Sunny South Florida. I have painted before both inside and outside and have essentially used paint that was already with the house to paint. Basically the whole exterior and interior needs to be repainted. I have a few buddies that will help me out. My question is this, what is the best type of paint to use outside and what is the best type of paint to use inside? We were looking into the Behr paint and primer in one paint, but I have read mixed reviews. I know I need to pressure wash the outside of the house as the current state of the paint is very chalky. If it all possible I would like to be able to do paint and primer in one, but I also want it to last. with the weather in South Florida we may only get a half a day to paint due to rain. Any info would be great.

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Old 07-30-2009, 11:51 AM   #2
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We were looking into the Behr paint and primer in one paint, but I have read mixed reviews.'

'Bad idea. The reviews saying so should be the ones you listen too.

I would like to be able to do paint and primer in one,

There is no such thing. Primer is primer,paint is paint, no matter what they tell you, they do not go in the same can.

Go to a real paint store, Ben Moore, Sherwin Williams, etc and ask someone who knows about paint what would be the best for your situation. Also, if it is going to rain within 4 or 5 hours after you are painting,dont.

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Old 08-02-2009, 11:24 PM   #3
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Paint technology has reformulated many Exterior house paints dramatically, There are resin based acrylic latex paints available that incorporate the primer into the topcoat ( paint), Sherwin Williams sales a product called duration. Depending on the soundness of the surface this is an acceptable product. prepare the substrate by cleaning all dirt and scraping all loose and peeling paint,caulking all nailheads and seams prior to applying the paint. Duration comes with a lifetime warranty if two coats are applied... I am not sure about behrs performance.
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Old 08-03-2009, 06:44 AM   #4
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The type of surface you have - both in and out - will dictate what type of paint, what prep work and what tools and techniques to use - and that discussion will happen in due time - but for now, what all of us will tell you is to use a 'quality' paint, such as the ones chrisn has mentioned. 'Quality' paints pay for themselves: in performance as you paint and performance over the long run - meaning fewer re-paints in a few years. Besides making you look like a hero. And who's not worth it more than your mom?

You'll get better hiding properties, better flowing properties and a number of better attributes that lower quality paints cannot give you. It may seem trivial now but once you've done a few hundred square feet or a number of rooms with a cheap paint, you'll see why all of us have come to the same conclusion you will: "go for quality"...

Say a quality paint costs you $50 a gallon and a cheap alternative $25. You might pay $20 per galllon more for the quality paint (it goes farther) but saves you repainting another time - either now or in three years time. The quality paint always wins hands-down. Cheaper in the long run...

I'm sure you know that 80% of a paint job is in the prep, so spending time ther getting the right groundwork laid is also worth it in the long run, so tell us what surface you are about to paint and we'll tell you the right way to proceed. Or the guys here will, as they know a lot more than me.

Primers+paints in one can??? Don't "cheap" out on your Mom...you have a good chance to do the right thing so do it. Money you can always get more of, time and effort is the same - so go for the gold...
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:56 PM   #5
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The whole thing comes down to how much money you want to spend.
There are many paints that are self priming but they don;t really hold up against the sun.

I would DEFINITELY prime any BARE wood on the north facing side of the house.
here are some fundamentals of painting.

1 the biggest adversity to paint is the sun.
2 The north facing side gets sun all day so it needs the most attention . you'll probably see for yourself it has weathered the most.
3 There's no such thing as a cheap paint job. cheap paint doesn't last as long and has a higher water content so you end up putting more on to cover and you end up using more paint.

if you are going to cut corners on primer do it on the south facing side.
if you want the best primer it is Zinnser BIN sealer. its spirit based primer and it will stick to just about anything.Also you will find it doesn't dull the sheen of the top coat like acrylic primer does. a drawback is that it's not cheap.


PS i live in the southern hemisphere so I'm thinking in southern hemisphere terms,but I think it's the same in your neck of the woods.

Last edited by nerd_flanders; 08-04-2009 at 10:02 PM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 06:08 AM   #6
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If all it came down to is how much money the OP wanted to spend, then there would be no questions, no responses and no threads...in that case, the cheapest paint wins...!

But here, like with most things, there are other factors that enter into the equation - and hopefully the point of these forums is to point them out to the person who...perhaps has less experience than others.

For example, the point about primers. Primers are formulated in such a way that all they do - and are meant to do - is create a suitable surface for the finish coat. Primers do that by using a certain type of resin and a certain type and amount of (cheaper, extender) pigments. Thus they are formulated quite differently than finish paint that are based upon a different set of requirements and therefore use a different set of resins and pigments. It's not that simple - but close...

Therefore one uses primers on bare surfaces like plaster and wood; you don't use finish paint. On the other hand, you cover an inside wall with paint - usually without primer - because the properties of primers aren't always required here. But if you did do the opposite and prime with a paint and paint with a primer, you'd be faced with a real mess, because you used the wrong product.

Resistance to UV rays in an outdoor paint is a property usually built-in with UV absorbers like the benzophenone family. They're not required in an inside paint - nor in a primer. Similarly, an outside paint resin requires flexibility and therefore they don't use the same set of resins as a primer. That's why acrylic resins in good quality paints stand up outdoors, whereas PVA resins in primers don't. Cheap extender pigments like calcium carbonate are needed in primers for their ability to fill in voids, whereas they're not required in wall paint as much.

This brings me to the combination of primer+paint in one can. Technically, feasible, for sure, to blend in a few primer extender pigments into a good wall paint - but by doing so you dilute the ability of that paint to do both functions, to fill in and cover. You end up with a compromise and probably less than terrific results. To me it's a marketing gimmick. Use a good primer and a good paint - and you'll get good results.

Quote: There's no such thing as a cheap paint job???

I see them every week. Normally by someone who thought that the only important thing was how much $$ they spent - or saved...to some, saving a $ is next to a religion.
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Old 08-07-2009, 08:59 AM   #7
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yea I see it all the time.Like today for example, self priming paint peeling off back to the bare wood.
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Old 08-07-2009, 05:29 PM   #8
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Outside:
The best paint I can recommend for your specific application is not a national brand
If you can get the regional brand Flex-Bon absolutely use that
Even if it's not "right down the corner" from you or "nationally known"
Flex-Bon is made locally (to your mom) made and specifically made for her local conditions
(think about it, an exterior paint made to work in Arizona USA AND Manitoba Canada has to have some compromises to work in all those different areas, but an exterior paint made in Florida and never wanting to sell paint outside of Florida can tailor the paint to specific conditions)

Interior:
...in FLA...doesn't matter as much as Ext.
But still, a good premium quality interior paint would be best
The Flex-Bon dealer may also carry Benjamin Moore, who's Regal line would be a great choice
...as would Sherwin Williams', Pittsburgh's, Pratt & Lambert's, or California's premium lines
If Mom has other issues, like major interior mold, wash-ability, or longevity problems, maybe one of those would be better for her...but other-wise most premium lines will do
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Old 08-16-2009, 08:13 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fstwrtr View Post
Paint technology has reformulated many Exterior house paints dramatically, There are resin based acrylic latex paints available that incorporate the primer into the topcoat ( paint), Sherwin Williams sales a product called duration. Depending on the soundness of the surface this is an acceptable product. prepare the substrate by cleaning all dirt and scraping all loose and peeling paint,caulking all nailheads and seams prior to applying the paint. Duration comes with a lifetime warranty if two coats are applied... I am not sure about behrs performance.
A NY professional painting contractor, all of our work is guarenteed, we use Sherwin Williams products, we do not use Duration, because Duration is only ment to go over a surface that has already been painted, that has no bare wood. Even when using Duration you still need to prime any bare surfaces on the substrate and so on. You should ask your local Sherwin Williams rep he/she will tell you the same thing. If I could get away with using Duration on exterior re-paints I would and I would save on labor and PRIMeR then, but the reality of it is That primer serves several purposes, the main purpose is for good adhearance of the top coat. Duration is an acrylic paint, not ment for priming. You need to wash the house good using a power washer and I recomend using liquid TSP following the label directions as its concentrated, rinse well. Don't apply TSP on glass. Scrape and sand off all loose paintN feather sand if needed, caulk as needed, apply a 100% acrylic primer such as Sherwin Williams A100 exterior primer to the surfaces to be painted, then apply two top coats of a 100% acrylic such as Sherwin Williams exterior Superpaint.
-kelloggspainting.
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Old 08-16-2009, 08:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fstwrtr View Post
Paint technology has reformulated many Exterior house paints dramatically, There are resin based acrylic latex paints available that incorporate the primer into the topcoat ( paint), Sherwin Williams sales a product called duration. Depending on the soundness of the surface this is an acceptable product. prepare the substrate by cleaning all dirt and scraping all loose and peeling paint,caulking all nailheads and seams prior to applying the paint. Duration comes with a lifetime warranty if two coats are applied... I am not sure about behrs performance.
The only way the Lifetime warranty is coveredN or any warranty on the can is covered is if your either a Sherwin Williams Certified Paint Applicator or They come out and Watch you prep and paint the house step by step to insure you've done it right. On the interior of your home clean the walls as needed, fix holes and cracks as needed, Prime using a acrylic interior primer on repair spots, bare spots, stains, and if your doing a drastic color change, then top coat with two coats of an acrylic.

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