Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-11-2013, 02:33 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 2,222
Share |
Default

Moulding before painting


I never really considered that, I'll look into it.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 04:21 PM   #17
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,512
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
They were correct.
The finishing ( ie caulking, filling etc) needs more than touch up, it needs a full coat- best if done after prime before both finish coats.
Sometimes I will prime before trim. But usually I will do walls last- then all the lines are made clean by cutting into the trim.
Listen to your painters, not the carpenters on this paint advice forum.

are there actual carpenters here?
you gotta watch out for those pesky roofers also.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 04:26 PM   #18
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,512
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by SquishyBall View Post
Don't they cross-train? Pretty sure you learn all the departments if you work there for an extended time.



Being a public DIY forum, I'd want a diverse spectrum of replies. Nothing wrong w tips from a non-pro.

I have always liked Joe's way of painting the walls myself... With many coats of primer to do on fresh drywall, it's fast and easy to prime clear down to the floor with a roller. Have your outlets all taken off and you can do everything but the corners w the roller.

Painting the trim too... if you're going paint grade, you can lay them all out on some saw horses and paint an entire Pro-pack of casings and baseboard trim in 20 min. Do that installed and you're edging w a brush all day long. If you're going stained then edging along stained moldings would take forever if you're doing 4 coats - 2 primer and 2 paint.

Then install. Then caulk. Then, if you've used a caulk that doesn't look right w your wall and baseboards, go do one final touch-up coat... also hit all the miter joints now to be sure they're all nice painted seams. This is faster... For me. Not saying pros can't do it faster another way -- and Pros are going to be much faster at edging that trim than a homeowner, so this might not be as big a deal for you.

Another consideration is that a pro paint company will want to come in, start and finish... last thing they want to do is break every project in two by doing half the work, wait for a finish carpenter to do the trim, then schedule out to the same house again to do the finish paint work. That's just not efficient. But a homeowner does not have that concern since he's there all the time.

Now Mrlucky was getting quotes to have this professionally painted, so yes, in that case, I fully agree w you for the above reason. Trim first so the paint contractor can just come in and do it all in one shot.

For what reason are you applying 2 coats of primer? Waste of time and $$
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 04:42 PM   #19
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Default

Moulding before painting


In new construction painters can find a room and make a set up like this for loose trim. not so easy in an occupied house.
Lots of reasons to not do it loose, but go ahead , I know why I don't.
And what works for a pro, works for a reason. maybe try and understand what the reasons are.

__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS

Last edited by Brushjockey; 04-11-2013 at 04:46 PM.
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2013, 06:43 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Default

Moulding before painting


You guys defending the point at hand do not even understand the topic and the painters objection to such. If you would listen and think this through, you'll realize that you are actually taking more time to do the project, not less, and you're getting an inferior product.
Firstly, why would anyone take two finished painted pieces, a wall and a piece of trim, then use fasteners to attach one to another, damaging the finished trim, then fuse them together with caulk, requiring even more repair? Consider the following points:

--Caulking must be painted, must be. There is no "well, the caulk matches the paint, therefore . . .". NO. Unpainted caulk collects dirt and turns black.
--Wherever two different colors or finishes meet one must overlap the other. That is Cutting In 101.
--If there are twenty fastener holes in a window frame, being generous here, some carpenters look like they fasten trim with a shotgun, you have twenty putty holes that need to be "touched up" with finish, and must be touched up twice, or you'll flash. If you use oil putty you are smearing an oil glaze on finish paint that will be noticeable. The fastest way to make touch ups visible is to establish a pattern.
--I could go on and on with the reasons why this is bad policy, and I'm not arguing for the sake of the proponents of the policy, but for the HO's who might be misled into believing it's valid.

On a new construction site, it's common to prime walls before trim goes up, in fact it's desirable. BUT, I've never seen an operation like that described here. If the homeowners here want to follow the advice of the carpenters over the day in day out painters, well go ahead. It's your time to waste not mine.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to jsheridan For This Useful Post:
chrisn (04-12-2013), ltd (04-11-2013)
Old 04-12-2013, 03:26 AM   #21
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,512
Default

Moulding before painting


--I could go on and on with the reasons why this is bad policy, and I'm not arguing for the sake of the proponents of the policy, but for the HO's who might be misled into believing it's valid.

I am glad you are here, with your talent for getting to the point in such a way that a novice can understand( for the most part)
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to chrisn For This Useful Post:
jsheridan (04-12-2013)
Old 04-12-2013, 05:06 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 661
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
You guys defending the point at hand do not even understand the topic and the painters objection to such. If you would listen and think this through, you'll realize that you are actually taking more time to do the project, not less, and you're getting an inferior product.
Firstly, why would anyone take two finished painted pieces, a wall and a piece of trim, then use fasteners to attach one to another, damaging the finished trim, then fuse them together with caulk, requiring even more repair? Consider the following points:

--Caulking must be painted, must be. There is no "well, the caulk matches the paint, therefore . . .". NO. Unpainted caulk collects dirt and turns black.
--Wherever two different colors or finishes meet one must overlap the other. That is Cutting In 101.
--If there are twenty fastener holes in a window frame, being generous here, some carpenters look like they fasten trim with a shotgun, you have twenty putty holes that need to be "touched up" with finish, and must be touched up twice, or you'll flash. If you use oil putty you are smearing an oil glaze on finish paint that will be noticeable. The fastest way to make touch ups visible is to establish a pattern.
--I could go on and on with the reasons why this is bad policy, and I'm not arguing for the sake of the proponents of the policy, but for the HO's who might be misled into believing it's valid.

On a new construction site, it's common to prime walls before trim goes up, in fact it's desirable. BUT, I've never seen an operation like that described here. If the homeowners here want to follow the advice of the carpenters over the day in day out painters, well go ahead. It's your time to waste not mine.
Great points. What is best to fill the holes on the trim from the nails? Caulk?Putty?
Mstrlucky74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 06:15 AM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Default

Moulding before painting


Thanks MstrLucky. I use lightweight vinyl spackle. It's very light, container feels empty, and has a dry shave cream consistency. It shrinks the least of anything I've found to date. I over fill the holes and let it dry overnight. It sands very easily so don't worry about keeping it clean. I then sand it flush when I sand my primed surface. I always sand both factory and hand primed trim so it's not an extra step for me.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 06:19 AM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Cape May, NJ
Posts: 2,392
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
--I could go on and on with the reasons why this is bad policy, and I'm not arguing for the sake of the proponents of the policy, but for the HO's who might be misled into believing it's valid.

I am glad you are here, with your talent for getting to the point in such a way that a novice can understand( for the most part)
You don't have a lot of company.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jsheridan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 07:14 AM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 661
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
Thanks MstrLucky. I use lightweight vinyl spackle. It's very light, container feels empty, and has a dry shave cream consistency. It shrinks the least of anything I've found to date. I over fill the holes and let it dry overnight. It sands very easily so don't worry about keeping it clean. I then sand it flush when I sand my primed surface. I always sand both factory and hand primed trim so it's not an extra step for me.
Trim comes primed. So you sand all the trim?
Mstrlucky74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 07:26 AM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: outside ocala fl
Posts: 2,839
Default

Moulding before painting


If it's primed why would you sand it, so you can prime it again?
ToolSeeker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 08:03 AM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 661
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker View Post
If it's primed why would you sand it, so you can prime it again?
I thought that is what JS said above.
Mstrlucky74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 08:25 AM   #28
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Default

Moulding before painting


Fill the holes and in the process of sanding those, give it all a quick once over. Prime- factory or on site, sometimes raises the grain a little and gets some stuff in it. Better job with a quick sand. Then 2 finish coats of a quality paint meant for trim.
The fine sanding sponges are the bomb for this..

BTW- some factory prime is worthless for holdout . Give this a test- reprime some small area of it and if the primer sucks right in, a full reprime with something like Zin 123 would give a much better base for the top coats.
It is not unusual to hear the phrase- Always reprime the preprime. catchy, aren't it?!
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS

Last edited by Brushjockey; 04-12-2013 at 09:24 AM.
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 10:01 AM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 2,222
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
--Caulking must be painted, must be. There is no "well, the caulk matches the paint, therefore . . .". NO. Unpainted caulk collects dirt and turns black.
No sense in talking in absolutes like that - it's simply not true. It's basically personal preference. It's true the top of baseboards collect dust, but unpainted caulk does not "turn black", as if infested with dye or mildew. It simply needs to be wiped or vacuumed, same as if no caulk were there. Semi-gloss trim paint is a bit easier to clean than caulk. Trim caulk on the sides of doors and windows on the other hand doesn't get dirty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
--Wherever two different colors or finishes meet one must overlap the other. That is Cutting In 101.
In this case, the caulk overlaps the paint. If you're not happy with the results, touch up with paint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
--If there are twenty fastener holes in a window frame, being generous here, some carpenters look like they fasten trim with a shotgun, you have twenty putty holes that need to be "touched up" with finish, and must be touched up twice
I think you're missing the point. It's easier to paint the trim before installing because you only have to paint part of the trim - the easy part. You can very quickly paint every bit of the trim sitting on sawhorses, or on the ground, without having to paint a line. Touching up involves only the middle part. It's the edges that are time consuming to get right. That's where the line must be perfect, and you're often on your hands and knees and sideways and uncomfortable while doing it, as opposed to prepainting the trim at waist height. If it's installed on carpet, then the carpet must be pulled back and taped off (or some other technique). The top edge requires a cut in line which is time consuming one way or another. Touching up the middle of trimwork is easy and fast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
--I could go on and on with the reasons why this is bad policy
List the additional reasons.

There are pluses and minuses to either method for painting trim.

Last edited by jeffnc; 04-12-2013 at 10:06 AM.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 01:21 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 661
Default

Moulding before painting


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
No sense in talking in absolutes like that - it's simply not true. It's basically personal preference. It's true the top of baseboards collect dust, but unpainted caulk does not "turn black", as if infested with dye or mildew. It simply needs to be wiped or vacuumed, same as if no caulk were there. Semi-gloss trim paint is a bit easier to clean than caulk. Trim caulk on the sides of doors and windows on the other hand doesn't get dirty.



In this case, the caulk overlaps the paint. If you're not happy with the results, touch up with paint.



I think you're missing the point. It's easier to paint the trim before installing because you only have to paint part of the trim - the easy part. You can very quickly paint every bit of the trim sitting on sawhorses, or on the ground, without having to paint a line. Touching up involves only the middle part. It's the edges that are time consuming to get right. That's where the line must be perfect, and you're often on your hands and knees and sideways and uncomfortable while doing it, as opposed to prepainting the trim at waist height. If it's installed on carpet, then the carpet must be pulled back and taped off (or some other technique). The top edge requires a cut in line which is time consuming one way or another. Touching up the middle of trimwork is easy and fast.



List the additional reasons.

There are pluses and minuses to either method for painting trim.
So when you paint the trim before when you nail it up won't you see the touch up paint over the putty/nail holes
Mstrlucky74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
painting crown moulding 16kennedy Painting 9 03-01-2012 04:40 AM
installing and painting moulding denemante Painting 0 04-29-2011 09:58 AM
Painting MDF crown moulding sk8z Painting 3 05-19-2008 04:11 PM
crown moulding painting WorkOnIt Painting 3 06-18-2007 10:56 AM
Is it best to caulk new moulding edges before painting? Davo Painting 8 04-14-2007 11:12 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.