Masonite Repair Primer And Paint - Painting - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-15-2012, 01:23 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Hello all,

I had a building contractor replace some of my masonite that had rotted with Hardy plank. He just replaced the whole row. I also had him replace some of the trim. I have done some handyman stuff myself but not this.

This stuff has lasted close to 40 years for the most part.

During the process of replacing the trim, he ripped the paper off some of the remaining masonite. These boards are in good shape other than that. He thinks it is just the paint he ripped and I can repaint and it will be fine. But it isn't. He ripped the facing.

Question - I want to primer this good so that it is protected. What kind of primer should I get for the bare Masonite and should I do anything else? I saw one person thin down Elmers contract glue with water and dab the bare spot over and over to allow a build up of glue.

I will be bringing ih a handyman to help.

Also, I have some new wood trim I will be primering. I have some KILZ H2O primer, but my regular painter said not to use it. Use a oil base primer. Does it matter which oil base primer I use?

wdpcpa

Advertisement

wdpcpa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 03:47 PM   #2
Member
 
Gymschu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Eastern Ohio (heart of Appalachia)
Posts: 3,044
Rewards Points: 2,300
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Masonite can be a pain in the butt to paint. In this case, since some of the facing was pulled off, you need to prime with a slow-drying oil based primer. If you use latex primer, it will cause the masonite to leech stains through the new paint film. After primer has dried, you may need to fill low spots/damaged spots with an exterior spackle or Elmer's wood filler. Allow that to dry, sand, clean, and apply primer to the spackle.........then you can repaint.

Advertisement

Gymschu is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 03:54 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
Masonite can be a pain in the butt to paint. In this case, since some of the facing was pulled off, you need to prime with a slow-drying oil based primer. If you use latex primer, it will cause the masonite to leech stains through the new paint film. After primer has dried, you may need to fill low spots/damaged spots with an exterior spackle or Elmer's wood filler. Allow that to dry, sand, clean, and apply primer to the spackle.........then you can repaint.
I was just at the SW store about 20 minutes ago. They had oil base spray in a can. Is this something I should consider or it there something else you suggest. Or just ask SW for a "Slo Drying" primer.

Also, for primer do I need to go to SW or is a big box store OK?

Thanks,
WDPCPA
wdpcpa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 03:57 PM   #4
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Gardz might be worth a shot over the damaged areas. I have never used it on masonite but have on paneling.

As for the trim, if it is a soft wood like pine or fir, you need to hit it with a sealer first. Sand any grain that gets raised. Shellac any knots, sap scars, etc. Then apply a primer. I am partial to solvent based primers for new wood but a good bonding enamel latex acrylic enamel underlay will work.

If staining, staining in successive layers to get the color and shade you want would replace the primer step over the sealer.

If you are painting you can use a sealer/primer combination. Expect to sand lightly after it dries as it may raise the grain as with sealer alone.

A good tried and true but old fashioned sealer is a 1:1 mix of processed (not raw) lindseed oil and a solvent like paint thinner or mineral spirits. You just have to wait out the solvent evaporating.

Of course you want two coats of clear coat on stained wood and two coats of paint on primed wood.

You can prime the trim off but I would attach it, sink nail heads, fill holes, etc. and paint in place. I guess you could put the firt coat on but you will notice the filled holes.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 03:59 PM   #5
Member
 
Gymschu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Eastern Ohio (heart of Appalachia)
Posts: 3,044
Rewards Points: 2,300
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Very few box stores even carry oil base primer anymore so definitely go to SW. They have a great slow-drying oil-based primer for exterior wood/masonite. I would just buy a quart can or a gallon can. The spray cans won't give you the proper coverage and will dry too fast to really penetrate the damaged masonite.

This is an exterior, correct?
Gymschu is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 04:07 PM   #6
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,634
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


If it is exterior, Benjamin Moore Fresh Start, Exterior, Alkyd would be another good choice.
user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 05:48 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
Very few box stores even carry oil base primer anymore so definitely go to SW. They have a great slow-drying oil-based primer for exterior wood/masonite. I would just buy a quart can or a gallon can. The spray cans won't give you the proper coverage and will dry too fast to really penetrate the damaged masonite.

This is an exterior, correct?
Yes, it is exterior. Thanks so much.


WDPCPA
wdpcpa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2012, 05:56 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Masonite repair primer and paint


Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Gardz might be worth a shot over the damaged areas. I have never used it on masonite but have on paneling.

As for the trim, if it is a soft wood like pine or fir, you need to hit it with a sealer first. Sand any grain that gets raised. Shellac any knots, sap scars, etc. Then apply a primer. I am partial to solvent based primers for new wood but a good bonding enamel latex acrylic enamel underlay will work.

If you are painting you can use a sealer/primer combination. Expect to sand lightly after it dries as it may raise the grain as with sealer alone.

...

You can prime the trim off but I would attach it, sink nail heads, fill holes, etc. and paint in place. I guess you could put the firt coat on but you will notice the filled holes.
This will all be painted.

I asked that everything be primed front and back prior to attaching but they didn't.

The new window trim is just regular pine 2Xs. There is a trim piece above the underpinning that is pine chair rail. I am somewhat concerned about that because it is decorative.

What is a good sealer/primer. Or should I use the same thing I am using for the Masonite. Benjamin Moore Fresh Start, Exterior, Alkyd is suggested above.

Thanks everyone for the help.

wdpcpa

Advertisement

wdpcpa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flat over Semi-Gloss dankreboot Painting 21 02-24-2013 08:46 PM
Oil based paint over Latex? No need for Primer? Jasonuncloned Painting 2 10-20-2010 11:33 PM
Paint riddle... Please help me fix this? techprincesse Painting 8 08-24-2009 11:00 AM
Flashing NoExperience Painting 13 09-04-2008 06:56 AM
oil base paints NoExperience Painting 30 09-04-2008 06:37 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts