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Old 10-19-2013, 03:35 PM   #1
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


In 1959/60 my grandfather made me a doll crib and painted it white. In 1985 I repaired the crib - strengthened it, and probably sanded down any rough spots and then repainted it for my daughter to use.

Now, it's time to pass it on to my 2 1/2 year old grand-daughter, it it just occurred to me that it was probably painted with lead based paint and I'm unsure of what my next step should be.

I've researced on-line, and it seems that the biggest concern for children's safety is if the paint was chipping and falling off or the child were to chew on the wooden surface, thereby injesting the paint and its toxins orally. No where have I seen anything that suggests just touching the painted surface should/would be harmful to a small child. Is this correct?

I want so much to keep the crib in the family and pass it on to Chloe, but I don't want to cause her harm, nor do I want to end up hurting my husband or myself by stripping off all the old paint. I know we would have to take great caution to remove the paint whether by sanding or chemical means, which could in the long run be more harmful than just leaving the paint as is, however for cosmetic purposes I want to touch up the minor dings and gouges in the surface of the wood which I would otherwise just sand down and repaint.

So... suggestions? Advice?

Thank you! Looking forward to hearing from all of you!

Kathy
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Old 10-19-2013, 04:22 PM   #2
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


Touching it posses no threat, if has been painted and there is no chipping and or dust, it is fine.
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Old 10-19-2013, 04:44 PM   #3
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


From my understanding as a lead safe painter, you are mostly correct in thinking there is little danger in just touching the paint as long as it is not deteriorated in any way. But even small amounts are dangerous for children, especially over time.

There are 'lead encapsulation paints out there.

http://www.dumondchemicals.com/home-...-products.html

For me, if I do nothing to the surface but wipe it off and paint it, that is not considered hazardous work.

Just painting over it would help a lot as long as the existing paint is sound.
You mentioned dings and gouges, these will be weak points where chipping could happen easily.
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Old 10-19-2013, 05:01 PM   #4
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


You can certainly get it tested, just take a small chip in to a laboratory. You can also purchase lead test kits at most big box stores. This way, you do not have to speculate on whether it was painted using lead based paint.

If it turns out to be lead paint, there is no way to detoxify the lead. You either remove it, or cover it with new paint to reduce the chances of the lead getting airborne. This is not a very good solution for a crib, since children apparently like to chew on lead based paint because it tastes sweet, so encapsulation is not a good plan for a crib.

You can remove the lead based paint yourself using chemical stripping agents, or perhaps a better plan would be to take it to a professional deleading shop where they can do the work for you, and leave you with a bare wood crib you can finish with a non-toxic material. If you decide to delead yourself, visit the EPA website that discusses safe methods for deleading. Sanding is a very bad plan, since it would put the lead into the air. Chemical stripping is the solution of choice, but even at that there are safety precautions required.
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Old 10-19-2013, 06:34 PM   #5
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


If it were me, why risk the health of your granddaughter if there is any chance of her being exposed to lead in any way, shape, or form. Just not worth risking a child's health.
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Old 10-19-2013, 09:06 PM   #6
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
If it were me, why risk the health of your granddaughter if there is any chance of her being exposed to lead in any way, shape, or form. Just not worth risking a child's health.
yea really . plus a crib built in the late fifties early sixty's cant be up to safety standers of todays cribs. oops my bad its a doll crib were talking bout

Last edited by ltd; 10-19-2013 at 09:08 PM.
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Old 10-20-2013, 09:08 AM   #7
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


I'd give it to Chloe when she's old enough to appreciate it. Presumably, past the gnawing stage.
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Old 10-20-2013, 03:11 PM   #8
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


Thank you for all the suggestions! Because it seems the smallest amount of the encapsulation paint I can buy is a gallon, and this is a doll crib that's only about 34" long, 24" wide and consists of a flat surface and lots of dowel rods for slats and such, I'll skip that idea.

However, I'm headed for Home Depot in a bit to find the test kits, and will go from there. Since I'm pretty sure I repainted in in '85 before I gave it to my daughter (before the thought of lead based paint even crossed my mind), I'll try to find an area of older paint to test first.

Thanks again for your suggestions, ideas and concerns. Will let you know what I figure out!

Kathy
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Old 10-20-2013, 03:19 PM   #9
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Making lead based paint "safe"?


To do an effective test you will need to expose all layers of paint.
One way is to use a razor knife and make a small angled cut that goes all the way to the wood. Maybe on the bottom side.

Good luck, I hope you don't see red!
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