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Old 11-16-2011, 11:20 AM   #1
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Living room ceiling.


What more does it need to be done before priming/painting? thanks


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Old 11-16-2011, 12:02 PM   #2
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Living room ceiling.


more reading in the painting section

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Old 11-16-2011, 03:22 PM   #3
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Living room ceiling.


You're either gonna have to skim coat the ceiling to make it all flush........or screw some new drywall over top of that mess.......that is, if you want it to look good. As it is, it looks pretty rough.
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Old 11-16-2011, 06:41 PM   #4
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See you are a newbie. My first reaction is you cannot be serious in your query. I think I will stick with it. Read the other posts. Use the search engine.
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Old 11-16-2011, 08:00 PM   #5
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You're either gonna have to skim coat the ceiling to make it all flush........or screw some new drywall over top of that mess.......that is, if you want it to look good. As it is, it looks pretty rough.
Rethought my comment. I know his comments. Gymschu did not mean to suggest you could skim coat that ceiling flush. You could try some lathe plaster repair anchors. You have a lot of work to do before priming and painting. You need to find out why that ceiling is failing and sagging just to start.

Are you playing us? Your situation seemed rather absurd. We will help if not.
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Old 11-16-2011, 09:28 PM   #6
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Living room ceiling.


No, I wasn't playing. I was serious, thanks for the responses.
It's an old house, built in the 1920's, this is not a DIY job which
is what I originally thought. I will keep reading other threads on here
so I can learn.
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Old 11-16-2011, 09:39 PM   #7
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Living room ceiling.


On a ceiling like that I will use about a Lb of sheetrock screws reattaching it to the lath, screen tape all major cracks, set tape and all larger fills with hot mud, skim all with hot mud, 3rd coat all with a sandable topping like plus three, sand smooth, prime, check over and touch up mud as needed, reprime that, and finish paint.
But thats just me...
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Old 11-16-2011, 11:01 PM   #8
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You can, as suggested try to pull the ceiling up with lath/plaster repair things but I just bet where it is really sagging, "there is no there there" (fave Gertrude Stein saying describing Oakland---suddenly ironic I guess).

I think you should rent a dumpster and demolish the ceiling. I fear it will go really fast.

Then hang new drywall. Once you figure out why that ceiling is bowing so much in the first place.

The repair anchors I use for lath and plaster are not cheap. They only work if there is some remaining integrity to the ceiling. And actually the lath structure itself. If it is badly broken they are a total waste of money.

Last edited by user1007; 11-16-2011 at 11:18 PM.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:45 AM   #9
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Living room ceiling.


First, I thought I would go with brush, but now,I think sdester's idea is a better one
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Old 11-17-2011, 05:15 AM   #10
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First, I thought I would go with brush, but now,I think sdester's idea is a better one

Although, I think I've been with sdsester pretty much from the start. But, you know me. Why patch a ceiling when you can re-rock. That'a what I always say.

To the lurkers, that's an inside joke.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:57 AM   #11
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Although, I think I've been with sdsester pretty much from the start. But, you know me. Why patch a ceiling when you can re-rock. That'a what I always say.

To the lurkers, that's an inside joke.
Yes, I agree with him also. As far as what caused the ceiling to get to that condition beats me. I would have to go with age.

The ceiling fan does shake a little at the highest speed,
there is a bedroom upstairs with wall to wall carpeting, there is a freight train that passes through around 5 times a day/night. The train tracks
are about 250 ft from the back of the house, with about 180 ft down
from the fence in the backyard.

There is no bathroom upstairs, that rules out any water leaks.
A popcorn ceiling would just be a temporary fix right?
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Old 11-17-2011, 12:33 PM   #12
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Living room ceiling.


Yes, popcorn or texturing may hold up for awhile, but, you will likely have cracks return. Drywall is inexpensive. That would be my option. By removing the plaster and lathe, you will be able to see if
there are any issues with the framing/ceiling joists. Then, you can correct any problems, drywall, and have a nice, smooth ceiling again.
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Old 11-17-2011, 04:26 PM   #13
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Living room ceiling.


A popcorn ceiling would just be a temporary fix right?

The weight would probably pull the whole thing down, which is probably where you want to go anyway. There are easier ways.

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