Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-04-2012, 12:12 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


I have a rewood pation table and was told to use raw linseed oil and not boiled to preserve the wood, which is the best for my application

ggm530 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2012, 12:15 PM   #2
the Musigician
 
DangerMouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: I'm right here!
Posts: 10,404
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


Quote:
Originally Posted by ggm530 View Post
rewood pation
huh???

Did you have a question?

DM

__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Click here to see some of my original magic tricks and trick boxes!
DangerMouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2012, 12:22 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


Yes,
I have a rewood patio table and was told to use raw linseed oil and not boiled to preserve the wood, which is the best for my application
ggm530 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2012, 12:44 PM   #4
Rubbin walls since'79
 
Brushjockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Mn
Posts: 2,518
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


Just had a really informative discussion about linseed oil
here
__________________
"It's better to come here with questions before you screw up than to come here after and ask how to fix them."- JS
Brushjockey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2012, 01:27 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 430
Rewards Points: 250
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


Quote:
Originally Posted by ggm530 View Post
I have a rewood pation table and was told to use raw linseed oil and not boiled to preserve the wood, which is the best for my application
Hiya GG...

Redwood is a really good wood to use for patio furniture 'cause it's so low maintenance. It really doesn't need anything to preserve it as it naturally resists insects, rot and mold...If it sets in direct sunlight for a period of time, it will weather to a silver-gray that many people find attractive. Sooooo - is this actually redwood? ...or is it stained whitewood (spf board) to look like redwood? If it has turned to a silver-gray, are you trying to restore it to it's original brownish-red color? (linseed oil won't do that).

Linseed oil is a great way to re-hydrate dry wood...and by that it helps to minimize the threat of dry rot. It is NOT insect repellant (grasshoppers love it) and, as mentioned in earlier posts, it very much is a food source for mildew growth (both raw and boiled). Were you planning on putting some type of finish over the linseed oil such as a stain or paint?

Several people here have opinions regarding linseed oil and some actually know the difference between raw and boiled. Without going into a lot of blah, blah, blah...Raw probably works better as a "preservative" - while boiled is probably better if using as a finish by itself (or if you're gonna be painting over it soon). Having said one works better as a preservative and one works better as a finish, does NOT change anything about their eccentric behaviors as described in the previous paragraph.

In other words, linseed oil may not be your best choice for preserving or refinishing your patio table. More info would help. Good luck.
ric knows paint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2012, 03:30 PM   #6
Too Short? Cut it Again!
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 9,635
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

linseed vs boiled linseed oil


I like mixing processed, not raw, lindseed oil with a solvent and using it as a sealer for new interior wood trim. Search for posts about this as this comes up often. Look for some of the folks that have used a similar mixture for outdoor cabins.

I personally would not use it outside and especially not by itself without something over it. That said, some of the cabin owners have gotten 40-50 years out of the strategy but with regular attention to replenishing it. It will by nature discolor and chalk somewhat.

I think there are better alternatives for clear sealing redwood.

I built a lot of redwood decks and furniture when designing such things on the West Coast. As mentioned you really don't have to do a lot to it given its natural properties. Some people do not like that gray look mentioned and it can look weird if subjected to sprinkler overspray.

If it is redwood I would use a product with the least amount of pigment you can get away with to even out color. The more pigment you put on the more you should expect to add to maintenance so use a semi-transparent or a semi-solid stain and try to stay away from a solid one. That said, if you want the look of a solid stain? If prepped nicely you should still get a number of years out of solid acrylic stain like Sherwin Williams Woodscapes or the comparable Ben Moore product.

Whatever you do, do not use a wax based product like Thompson's. You will only get a season out of it if lucky and read posts on this site about mold and mildew getting into it and turning it black.

user1007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linseed Oil Paint??? GSP Painting 24 08-02-2012 04:41 PM
Linseed Oil bobat Painting 12 05-20-2011 04:22 AM
Latex over alkyd primer TVC15 Painting 15 08-14-2010 11:42 PM
Window Glazing question DIY DUDE Painting 28 04-23-2010 09:45 AM
linseed based primer boman47k Painting 6 12-10-2006 11:22 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.