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Old 06-17-2013, 07:51 AM   #16
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Lead Paint Follow-Up


Lead hotline: (800) 424-5323. Get some factual information, not merely anecdotes.

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Old 06-17-2013, 08:07 AM   #17
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There is plenty of factual information in RWolffs post.

Having done BLL tests after some years of working with the materials and on the abatement side of things, if you used common sense exposure mitigation techniques, you are more than fine.
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Old 06-17-2013, 09:40 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Will22 View Post
Lead hotline: (800) 424-5323. Get some factual information, not merely anecdotes.

Factual information from the same govt/govt branch shills/EPA/health dept who gave us such notable projects as the Tuskeegee experiment, Tonkin Bay "incident" that never happened, declared the air "safe" around the WTC right after 911 so Wall street could open faster but later found to be a coverup, not to mention the very curious fact the HIV/AIDS epidemic started just months after the health dept in NYC began injecting gay men in that city with an experimental hepatitus vaccine, and then there's all the scandals... to give us FACTS and the truth?
No thanks, I trust the govt and it's myriad number of paid department and redundent agency shills about as much as I would trust Al Capone.

They have already proven over many years that they can't be trusted.

That hotline goes to the EPA since a google search reveals it and this:

Quote:
NLIC operates under a contract with the EPA, with funding from the EPA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
It has the EPA seal and logos all over it too, I'd trust them for factual information about as much as I'd trust the asbestos industry' asbestos study results.
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Old 06-17-2013, 11:34 PM   #19
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Old 06-18-2013, 12:09 AM   #20
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Roughdraft, seriously, you need to stop reading, you're too gullible and naive, with all due respect. You're literally freaking yourself out. You're equating a common everyday environmental metal with ebola virus. This is exactly the kind of reaction the government wants and needs to see. They create an hysteria with nonsense and then devise a "cure", a "solution" through which they can control you and extort your money.

In 1992-93 when this current lead scheme was hatched, elevated blood lead levels were found in about 4%+ of America's children, mostly inner city ghetto kids who lived in decrepit, poorly maintained housing with very little parental oversight. They were eating the sweet tasting lead paint chips, and getting dosed from the dust created by moving painted parts, like window sashes and doors. This was not a nationwide problem/epidemic.

When all of these lead control mandates became effective a while back, by the EPA's own admission, ebll's were down to just above 1%. The further we got away from the 1977 ban on lead in paint, among other things, and under voluntary compliance the problem was going away. The government needed to scare the sheet out of people to go along with a nationwide blanket solution to a pocket problem, that by their own admission was going away without their program. This is by far one of the most hair brained idiotic programs I've seen to date, and not only is it being ignored, it's become a joke.

I live in a Victorian city where you can't spit without hitting a lead painted surface, and other than the tenting of the water tower recently, I've never seen any compliance practices.

I truly believe that the government is afraid to aggressively regulate this charade, because someone will refuse to roll over and challenge them, and I think the courts will start unraveling it. Meanwhile, painters are lining up to become certified and put themselves and their business in the crosshairs of federal regulators and trial lawyers. When the trial bar gets done picking the pockets of the paint cos over lead, which they're currently doing, they're going to go down the chain to the contractors. The government is making money, the instructors/trainers are making money, and the trial lawyers are making money, just as it was intended. They're following the asbestos template.

You have far more dangerous things to be worried about than lead. Take a valium.
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Old 06-18-2013, 09:56 AM   #21
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In 1992-93 when this current lead scheme was hatched, elevated blood lead levels were found in about 4%+ of America's children, mostly inner city ghetto kids who lived in decrepit, poorly maintained housing with very little parental oversight. They were eating the sweet tasting lead paint chips, and getting dosed from the dust created by moving painted parts, like window sashes and doors. This was not a nationwide problem/epidemic.
Thanks for bringing out the facts, and I remember that one too because I lived in the big city in the 70s and well remember those 'hoods.
They lived in old 1880's era apartments that were painted and repainted with cheap paint every time a tenant moved out, you could find 20 coats of paint or more on the walls, windowsills etc etc.
But by the 70s the landlords were walkign away from these buildings in huge numbers,there were over 500 of these buildings abandoned in one neighborhood alone!
That particular neighborhood was 5 blocks wide by 15 blocks long, and with the neglect and abandonment painting and maintenance stopped, leaving old peeling paint, broken windows, damaged plaster walls.

These are 2 such apartment buildings in one block, there were more than a dozen just like these in ONE city block, this is what the hood was like, and the kids would go play and hang out in these abandoned buildings too.

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Old 06-18-2013, 01:28 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by jsheridan View Post
You're equating a common everyday environmental metal with ebola virus. This is exactly the kind of reaction the government wants and needs to see. They create an hysteria with nonsense and then devise a "cure", a "solution" through which they can control you and extort your money.
This reminded of common things such as influenza, something that is super easy to catch just breathing the elevator air after someone with the flu sneezes there!

This might put some perspective on things, of course lead poisoning can lead to other health issues besides death, but not including illnesses- JUST the deaths:

Quote:
Deaths related to lead poisoning in the United States, 1979-1998.

Environ Res. 2003 Feb;91(2):78-84.

This study was conducted to describe trends in US lead poisoning-related deaths between 1979 and 1998.
An estimated 200 lead poisoning-related deaths occurred from 1979 to 1998. Most were among males (74%), Blacks (67%), adults of age >/=45 years (76%), and Southerners (70%). The death rate was significantly lower in more recent years. An alcohol-related code was a contributing cause for 28% of adults. Only three of nine ICD-9 codes for lead poisoning were highly predictive of lead poisoning-related deaths. In conclusion, lead poisoning-related death rates have dropped dramatically since earlier decades and are continuing to decline. However, the findings imply that moonshine ingestion remains a source of high-dose lead exposure in adults.

And now for influenza:

Quote:
An August 27, 2010 MMWR report entitled “Thompson MG et al. Updated Estimates of Mortality Associated with Seasonal Influenza through the 2006-2007 Influenza Season. MMWR 2010; 59(33): 1057-1062.," provides updated estimates of the range of flu-associated deaths that occurred in the United States during the three decades prior to 2007. CDC estimates that from the 1976-1977 season to the 2006-2007 flu season, flu-associated deaths ranged from a low of about 3,000 to a high of about 49,000 people. Death certificate data and weekly influenza virus surveillance information was used to estimate how many flu-related deaths occurred among people whose underlying cause of death was listed as respiratory or circulatory disease on their death certificate.

The JAMA study also looked at seasonal influenza-associated deaths over a 23 year period, from 1976-1977 and 1998-1999. During that period, estimates of respiratory and circulatory influenza-associated deaths ranged from about 5,000 to about 52,000, with an average of about 25,000.
Note that this in a per year figure.
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Old 06-18-2013, 04:23 PM   #23
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In reading this I can't believe I am still alive. Red lead paint was common when I was young, we used to buy asbestos fibers and mix it with mortar to mud thimbles into chimneys, I used to work with asbestos siding with my dad, and in the service we used to prime metal with Zinc-Chromate Primer. Gasoline contained lead and so did all paints.

I know all this stuff is bad for you, but for some reason there seemed to be a lot fewer kids that were ADHD, Austistic and other things. Maybe there is no connection though.

Of course when we suffered from attention deficit, the old man got our attention back with a size 11 Brogan planted in the middle of our axe.

I dont think that this is the accepted manner of addressing this disorder today.
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Old 06-18-2013, 04:58 PM   #24
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For the OP, in addition to the HEPA vac, if it would give you peace of mind you could find a local company that does lead checks for you. I have a local company that for about $150 will come in and do 7 sample/tests with a scanner.

Just a thought, maybe it would put you at ease if *someone else* told you it was all clear.

Also DeWALT just came out with a certified? HEPA vac, as well as good models available from Fein and Festool.

http://www.toolup.com/dewalt_dwv012_...d=scsho3006483

One of the most useful practices for lead is to hook up a vac to the tool while you are using it. It's a lot easier to capture the dust at creation rather than after it has blanketed the work area.
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Old 06-18-2013, 08:31 PM   #25
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Just a thought, maybe it would put you at ease if *someone else* told you it was all clear.
Several someone elses have already done this, something just tells me it won't make any difference other than making the OP $150 poorer and some guy with a "lead scanner" to hunt down the 1/10000th of a microgram of lead left in the entire house- $150 richer.

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