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Old 03-25-2008, 11:52 PM   #1
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Layers of Paint


My wife and I are in the process of buying an older home (67 yrs old), and the walls have multiple layers of paint. I don't think that painting over them would look very good. I'm almost positive that there is lead paint underneath all the layers. I need advice one what to do! Should I sand down all the walls (if there are any other ways of stripping the paint please let me know) or is Skimming the walls a viable solution, I've read about it somewhere else but have never done it. I want whatever is quicker less expensive and easier to do. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!!!!

-Dank

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Old 03-26-2008, 12:54 AM   #2
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If your home was built before 1978 there is a good chance the paint has lead. It is best to not disturb the walls and call a professional that can deal with lead and is trained to do so. iIt is possible that the walls may not pose a danger and that is what you need to determine with a professional. Do not attempt to remove the walls yourself when it comes to lead, that may pose a greater danger than before.

Again if the walls do need to be removed that should be done by a professional! There are some things left to a professional and this just happens to be one of them!

I have been in the business for 10 plus years and would not steer you wrong, I write articles on many how to subjects involving paint on my site but this is one article you will never find a how to on other than to call a pro.

My niece had gotten lead poisening from an apartment she lived in. They had to move and that was 3 years ago and her levels are just back to normal.

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Old 03-26-2008, 12:55 AM   #3
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Whatever you do do not sand down the walls!!!!!!!
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Old 03-26-2008, 06:54 AM   #4
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I don't think that painting over them would look very good.

Why not?
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:20 AM   #5
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Most paint stores carry lead test kits.Do a test,if it comes out positive then call a PRO!!!
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Old 03-26-2008, 10:13 AM   #6
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There is a surplus of information out there about lead paint removal. Read! Read! Read! before you start your painting project. Plumbic gases are hazardous and you need to make sure you know what you are getting into.

If what you read scares you, or if you have children (or plans to have children in the near future), or if you want to use the property commercially consider using a pro.

After weighing the risks I've decided I am going to remove the paint in my 205 year old farmhouse using an IR paint stripper and a good deal of caution and common sense.
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Old 03-26-2008, 10:37 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
I don't think that painting over them would look very good.

Why not?

You can tell that there are multiple layers of paint. Just painting over it I'm guessing will just add to the mess. Just to add a little more info to the question, The house is very small and there is not to much to strip/paint. We do have a 3 year old, but the house is completely empty and we have all the time that we need to paint and fix up. I haven't heard anybody mention putting a "joint compound over the old paint" which i've heard somewhere, or did I here wrong? I heard it gives it a new wall look. If its true is it hard to do. Also, when you guys mention pro, what exactly would a professional do?
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:03 PM   #8
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warning
Do not sand, scrape, media blast, use methylene chloride, propane torch or heat gun that operates over 700* F on this stuff


Quote:
Originally Posted by dankreboot View Post
We do have a 3 year old...
For the love of God no not try a DIY lead removal


Quote:
Originally Posted by dankreboot View Post
I haven't heard anybody mention putting a "joint compound over the old paint" which i've heard somewhere, or did I here wrong? I heard it gives it a new wall look. If its true is it hard to do.
Mmmmm...yes, well...you are referring to a "skim coat"
It is absolutely not easy for a DIYer to do
And unfortunately it involves a tremendous amount of sanding, which with the risks involved to you and especially your child, you can not do

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Also, when you guys mention pro, what exactly would a professional do?
That depend on the state certification laws
They can vary, but in any state I know of or have heard of, it basically amounts to those "outbreak" hazmat suits, HEPA filters, 'clean rooms'...etc...
Kind of like the asbestos deal...
It is considered a Hazardous Material and dangerous in dust form
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:52 PM   #9
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I second the responders here. Don't screw around with this stuff. (And I hope that doesn't get edited out because this is a situation worth getting a little forceful) Get a professional. And if you can't afford to have it removed, I would consider living with the recoat "looking messy". I would think its a small price to pay versus the health of you and your family.
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Old 03-26-2008, 11:24 PM   #10
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Point taken! It looks like lead is quite dangerous. Thanks for the help, I think we'll just leave the paint there and put a fresh coat over it and just change the moldings and the door trims. So with that said. What type of paint do you guys suggest would work best on many layers of paint? I want the freshest look without spending too much money!
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Old 03-27-2008, 07:16 AM   #11
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What type of paint do you guys suggest would work best on many layers of paint? I want the freshest look without spending too much money!

Just stay away from the big box stores and buy the best quality paint you can afford. You say you do not want to spend too much money ( who does) but this is YOUR home and what you will be looking at every day, do you really want to skimp on that? I would hope not.
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Old 03-27-2008, 02:21 PM   #12
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I like Benjamin Moore. Use a flat paint it will hide imperfetions the best and go with a light neutral color! I really hope you do not try sanding the walls it will get into the ducts the dust and pose a continuing health issue for any children who come in the house.
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Old 03-29-2008, 08:32 AM   #13
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Ben Moore Aura or Sherwin Williams Duration is what you need here. To try and cover up the imperfections introduced by a zillion coats of paint, both of those paints mentioned above are available "scrubbable/washable" matte paints.

And as a warning, they aren't cheap. If you go with Duration, sign up for Sherwin's "Preferred Customer" program, and you will save at least a little.

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Old 04-01-2008, 05:53 PM   #14
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How about Kelley-Moore paints? Do they have quality paint? Our potential neighbor is a Kelley-Moore sales rep so we might be able to get some kind of discount! YAY for neighbors!
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Old 04-02-2008, 05:00 AM   #15
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Kelly-Moore should do just fine. As always, buy paint at or near the top of the product line.

SirWired

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