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Old 08-22-2015, 07:05 PM   #1
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Latex paint reviews


Looking for some insight on what paint is good to use for eggshell.

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Old 08-22-2015, 08:18 PM   #2
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Do a search, there's literally dozens of threads on here about good paint.

For starters, I like SW's Cashmere Low Lustre, it has an eggshell type finish to it.
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Old 08-22-2015, 08:35 PM   #3
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Heather:

There's a saying:

"When it comes to paint, you get what you pay for."

I use Pratt & Lambert Accolade Satin paint on my walls. It's an expensive paint at about $50 Cdn per gallon. But, it hides very well, it doesn't spatter and it dries to a hard film that stands up well to hard scrubbing. When I used to buy cheap paint, (CIL brand, which is a subsidiary of ICI Ltd. of England), I paid less for every gallon, but the paint was much worse at all of those criteria.

So, this might sound like hypocrisy, but my advice is to buy the most expensive eggshell paint that's commonly available in your area, but buy it from the place that sells it the cheapest.

Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams, Pratt & Lambert, and other well known name brands all make great paints. You won't go wrong by buying any of their top-of-the-line products.
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Old 08-22-2015, 08:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heathermaudsley View Post
Looking for some insight on what paint is good to use for eggshell.
Tough question to answer in general. What does "good to use" mean? It all depends on your priorities. Do you want something that's easy to work with? Something that covers well? Something that wears well? Something that levels out well? Something that touches up well? Something that's inexpensive?

In general, Nestor is absolutely right. You get what you pay for. I use a lot of Sherwin-Williams SuperPaint.
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Old 08-23-2015, 02:58 AM   #5
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Everybody will have a favorite for different reasons. I use this.

Ignore the Behr copycat label, it means nothing
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Old 08-23-2015, 09:28 AM   #6
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I think that's the first time I've seen "stain repellent" on a label.

I would alter the "buy most expensive paint you can find" advice, to: buy something like the second most expensive. This will get you out of the realm of Emerald, Aura, which are probably overkill given the OP's question, and into other paints that are plenty good enough for your needs. If you go to Home Depot or Lowes, just buy the most expensive paint they have. If you go to Sherwin Williams or Benjamin Moore, maybe get the second most expensive and try to get it on sale. This will get you stuff like Regal Select, Duration, etc.
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Old 08-23-2015, 09:59 AM   #7
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I wouldn't rule out Ben by BM, one step down from Regal. I've used lots of it and it really performs well.
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Old 08-23-2015, 04:58 PM   #8
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Here's some GoodHousekeeping reviews for what they're worth:

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home...paint-reviews/
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Old 08-23-2015, 04:59 PM   #9
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PREMIUM PLUS ULTRAŽ Interior Paint & Primer

touts "stain blocking paint and primer in one"


so you have stain repellent versus stain blocking
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Old 08-23-2015, 08:15 PM   #10
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I'd probably steer clear of any latex paint that either:

1. Proclaims loudly on it's label that it's "100% Acrylic". In paint-speak, this simply means that the plastic resins in it are made of the same kind of plastic as Plexiglas. Paint companies slap that text on their labels to convince uninformed consumers that they won't get a better paint by paying more because this paint is already 100 percent acrylic. Everyone knows there's no such thing as 101% anything. In fact, there are hundreds of different "100% Acrylic" resins that are used to make latex paints, floor finishes, grout & masonry sealers, water based stains and even women's nail polish. All of them have different characteristics and cost different amounts. You need someone knowledgeable about all the different acrylic resins available from all the different resin manufacturers to choose a suitable one to make a product out of.

2. That calls itself an "enamel". The word "enamel" doesn't have a strict definition, but over the decades has come to mean "a paint that dries to a smoother and harder film than you'd expect from a regular paint". But, because of continuous improvements in the chemistry of latex paint resins and paint additives, EVERY paint dries to a smoother harder film than the same paint did two decades ago. So, technically, every paint can be considered an "enamel". But, paint companies slap this text on their labels in order to convince the uninformed consumer that the gallon contains something better than ordinary latex paint... it contains an "enamel" and it'll dry to a harder and smoother film than another company's paint.

People who are knowledgeable about paint recognize that the only reason for adding wording like this to the label of a can of paint is to fool the generally uninformed consumer into buying that paint, and that leaves a sour taste in one's mouth. It's intentionally fooling people into buying paint instead of producing a better product and relying on quality to grow your paint sales.
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Old 08-23-2015, 09:24 PM   #11
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I agree "enamel" doesn't mean much anymore, but I wouldn't necessarily be that harsh. "Enamel" has often meant "sheen", basically. In other words, typically eggshell, semi-gloss, gloss paints. It's just a word that some customers, especially older ones, recognize, more so than a label of false quality.
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Old 08-24-2015, 03:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
Here's some GoodHousekeeping reviews for what they're worth:

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home...paint-reviews/
I only see 1 SW paint there and that was super paint.while most all of ppg's paints that I use are there
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Old 08-24-2015, 07:17 AM   #13
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I was under the impression "enamel" referred more to hardness than sheen.
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Old 08-24-2015, 08:53 AM   #14
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It would be kind of hard to tell, because they really tend to go hand in hand. In terms of perception, most customers expect a paint to be somewhat shiny if it has "enamel" on the label.

My mother happens to be visiting from out of town, so on a whim I just asked her "If I said 'enamel paint', what does that mean to you?" She said "Shiny, hard."
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Old 08-24-2015, 04:55 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffnc View Post
It would be kind of hard to tell, because they really tend to go hand in hand. In terms of perception, most customers expect a paint to be somewhat shiny if it has "enamel" on the label.

My mother happens to be visiting from out of town, so on a whim I just asked her "If I said 'enamel paint', what does that mean to you?" She said "Shiny, hard."
Which ,back in the day, would have meant oil

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