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-   -   latex paint over oil-based = peeling paint! help! (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/latex-paint-over-oil-based-peeling-paint-help-81408/)

ImaDIYnewbie 09-14-2010 10:25 AM

latex paint over oil-based = peeling paint! help!
 
Hi,
I just purchased a condo, and the previous owner did a sloppy job painting before they moved. It's obvious no prep work was done before they repainted.

In the bathroom, it appears that they painted a latex paint over an oil-based paint (or vice versa). The top surface of paint can literally be scratched with a fingernail and peeled off in a stretchy, latex strip. Unfortunately, not all the strips come off that easy, and this paint was extended to the ceiling as well.

Is there a solution that can be used on the walls to facilitate removal? Sanding it just results in the paint gumming up in little balls. I want to get off this top layer without damaging the walls underneath.

The previous owner also painted all the trim work without sanding, and they painted flat paint over a semi-gloss. That too is peeling. Any suggestions on how to easily remove?

Thanks,

Windows 09-14-2010 11:29 AM

Why do sellers do things like this? It is so frustrating, and unfortunately there is no easy way to fix it. I would take a sharp, flexible 3 inch putty knife and with a heat gun on low setting and try to massage off as much of the top layer of paint on the walls as possible. Next, sand the walls with an orbital sander with 100 or 120 grit paper and apply a quality latex bonding primer. Next skim coat with mud any areas that were damaged or are not smooth, sand, and primer and apply finish coats. As for the trim, depending on the profile, the quantity of trim, and the extent of the damage, you may try something similar as for the walls, or you may just sand them and prime them and call them good, or you may want to replace the trim. Either way you should definitely send the previous owner a "bill" for $2500.00 and advise him to next time hire a pro.

epson 09-14-2010 11:31 AM

The only way I know how to remove the latex paint is to mix 1 gallon of warm water and 1 tbsp. of liquid dish-washing soap. Mix the two. Saturate a sponge in the mixture and wring out the excess liquid so the sponge is damp, not soggy. Now roll up your sleeves and start scrubbing the walls with the sponge to remove the latex paint. Keep scrubbing the walls and peeling away any loose latex paint from the walls until all latex paint is removed. If you have some stubborn latex paint that won’t come off then pour a mild paint stripper into a plastic paint tray (wear rubber gloves when working with paint strippers) dip a paintbrush into the mild paint stripper and apply it to the latex paint and make sure you have proper air ventilation during this paint removal process.
Allow the paint stripper to sit on the wall for the predetermined time. Each brand of paint stripper has its own specific time frame. However, paint strippers typically need 20 to 30 minutes to soften the latex paint. When the paint is softened enough remove the paint stripper and softened latex paint from the walls by using a plastic paint scraper then wipe the chemical and paint off the scraper with either a damp towel or some paper towels after each pass. Continue in this manner until you have removed all latex paint from the oil-based paint. Now wash the walls clean to remove any paint stripper residue with a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1 tbsp. of liquid dish soap by using a lint-free cloth saturated in the mixture to thoroughly clean the walls and allow the walls to dry completely before you apply any paint on the walls.

ImaDIYnewbie 09-14-2010 12:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows (Post 500971)
Why do sellers do things like this? It is so frustrating, and unfortunately there is no easy way to fix it. I would take a sharp, flexible 3 inch putty knife and with a heat gun on low setting and try to massage off as much of the top layer of paint on the walls as possible. Next, sand the walls with an orbital sander with 100 or 120 grit paper and apply a quality latex bonding primer. Next skim coat with mud any areas that were damaged or are not smooth, sand, and primer and apply finish coats. As for the trim, depending on the profile, the quantity of trim, and the extent of the damage, you may try something similar as for the walls, or you may just sand them and prime them and call them good, or you may want to replace the trim. Either way you should definitely send the previous owner a "bill" for $2500.00 and advise him to next time hire a pro.

Thank you, Windows! This is helpful. I was using the flexible putty knife, which seemed to work well on the trim, but didn't work in the bathroom since the walls are orange peel. The putty knife didn't glide as easily over that as it did on the trim.

My mom actually recommended using a hair dryer on low to soften the paint, and since you suggested the heat gun, it sounds like she was on the right track.

Thanks for the input! I appreciate this.

ImaDIYnewbie 09-14-2010 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by epson (Post 500974)
The only way I know how to remove the latex paint is to mix 1 gallon of warm water and 1 tbsp. of liquid dish-washing soap. Mix the two. Saturate a sponge in the mixture and wring out the excess liquid so the sponge is damp, not soggy. Now roll up your sleeves and start scrubbing the walls with the sponge to remove the latex paint. Keep scrubbing the walls and peeling away any loose latex paint from the walls until all latex paint is removed. If you have some stubborn latex paint that won’t come off then pour a mild paint stripper into a plastic paint tray (wear rubber gloves when working with paint strippers) dip a paintbrush into the mild paint stripper and apply it to the latex paint and make sure you have proper air ventilation during this paint removal process.
Allow the paint stripper to sit on the wall for the predetermined time. Each brand of paint stripper has its own specific time frame. However, paint strippers typically need 20 to 30 minutes to soften the latex paint. When the paint is softened enough remove the paint stripper and softened latex paint from the walls by using a plastic paint scraper then wipe the chemical and paint off the scraper with either a damp towel or some paper towels after each pass. Continue in this manner until you have removed all latex paint from the oil-based paint. Now wash the walls clean to remove any paint stripper residue with a solution of 1 gallon of water and 1 tbsp. of liquid dish soap by using a lint-free cloth saturated in the mixture to thoroughly clean the walls and allow the walls to dry completely before you apply any paint on the walls.

Epson, thank you for responding. This sounds like a good plan on attack as well. You and Windows have both given me some great ideas to try out in the condo. I will report back on what technique worked out the best!

ImaDIYnewbie 09-20-2010 04:48 PM

Just wanted to circle back with a status update. We've tried everything to try to get this paint off the walls in an even fashion, including chemical paint strippers (we've tried two different brands.) Nothing has worked efficiently so we are at our wits end.

After contemplating tearing out the drywall (perhaps it was the paint stripper fumes getting to us!), we've decided to take Windows approach to sand the walls, and then fill in with mud, and then resand, and prime and paint.

It's either that, or we are just gonna sand and put up wallpaper (yuck) to "hide" the nasty walls.


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