Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Painting

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-11-2010, 08:38 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


I removed a 9' floor cabinet in my dining room and exposed this.

There is one layer of fiber covered wallpaper on drywall. The area with red paint on it extends about 1/16" farther out than the bare drywall below it. I want to get a smooth surface on the wall where the cabinet used to be and paint the entire room a new color.

I assume the first steps are:

- remove wallpaper (area stained by previous water spill behind the cabinet came off quite easily)
- coat with oil-based primer (?)

Then what? Scrape and/or sand to smooth down the edge of the old paint, apply joint compound to the whole area, and sand? Is there a mesh I need to apply to get the joint compound to adhere better? If so, is there a mesh that is 12" or more wide?

Thanks.
Attached Thumbnails
Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?-dr-wall-001.jpg   Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?-dr-wall-005.jpg   Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?-dr-wall-003.jpg   Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?-dr-wall-007.jpg  

Amycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 09:14 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 291
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


I'd be tempted to simply pull the baseboards and apply new 1/4" wallboard to that entire section.

Plan B would be to seal that mesh with a good oil based primer/sealer as long as it's not loose. Then use a skim coat of setting compound (vs. joint compound) until you get the surfaces matched and flush. Sand smooth and/or splatter on texture then prime and paint.

Who's the helper in your image??


Last edited by hennyh; 06-11-2010 at 09:27 AM.
hennyh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 10:15 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


Can you please explain what setting compound is?

The model in the photo is one of my cats. They always insist on helping out; for example, by tracking paint spatters across unprotected areas of the hardwood floors.
Amycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 11:16 AM   #4
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,794
Rewards Points: 1,028
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


Quote:
Originally Posted by hennyh View Post
I'd be tempted to simply pull the baseboards and apply new 1/4" wallboard to that entire section.

Plan B would be to seal that mesh with a good oil based primer/sealer as long as it's not loose. Then use a skim coat of setting compound (vs. joint compound) until you get the surfaces matched and flush. Sand smooth and/or splatter on texture then prime and paint.

Who's the helper in your image??
Not meaning to cause sparks, but have you ever actually done that on a wall before? You will have to shorten at least 2 baseboards on adjoining walls. You will more than likely have to replace the plug and switch boxes screws if not the boxes themselves. There is a door jam just to the right I assume so now you need a jam extension. You now need to tape & float the wall as well as onto the adjoining walls and ceiling.

Pull the mesh wallpaper, sand the line where the paint stopped and then prime. Smooth wall with joint compound as needed.
Matthewt1970 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 11:53 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


With joint compound, do I need to apply the adhesive-backed mesh onto the drywall first? (this would be after removing the wallpaper)

I have no urge to remove/replace drywall. There is crown molding and I just got the ceiling re-plastered. If I just cut out the exposed section I'd still need to use shims or something to get it even with the painted surface.
Amycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 03:44 PM   #6
Member
 
Matthewt1970's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,794
Rewards Points: 1,028
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


You only need mesh or paper tape where there are cracks or where 2 pieces of drywall join together. If it still has the original tape on the corners and joints then you are good to go.

Setting compound is the stuff that comes in bags in powder form and you need to mix it with water. It sets by chemical reation due to the plaster of paris in it in the alloted time in minutes; 20, 45, 90, 120. It is really good for first coats on unfinished drywall as it dries harder and quicker than normal joint compound giving you a stronger joint and allows for second coating most times the same day.
Matthewt1970 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 05:15 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 323
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


I agree with feathering in joint compound over the edges, prime and paint. Is there another piece of furniture you can put in that space--or most of it--so it won't look so obvious if it's not perfect?
Allison1888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 05:17 PM   #8
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,790
Rewards Points: 2,086
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


This is not that complicated. Strip paper using some hot water,I am betting it will come right off without ANY removal solution at all, just get a spray bottle or garden sprayer and SOAK with hot water.Scrape the area as best you can to smooth where the edge is, sand the rest of it smooth. If that does not give you a smooth enough transition, just skim the area with regular joint compound, sand smooth and clean. Apply Gardz to the whole area and paint.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 05:36 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


When you say "skim the area," do you mean the entire area of drywall where I'll have removed the wallpaper, or just the area along the edge of the old paint where I've smoothed/sanded? The entire area of the exposed wallpaper is about 9' X 3' on one wall.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
This is not that complicated. Strip paper using some hot water,I am betting it will come right off without ANY removal solution at all, just get a spray bottle or garden sprayer and SOAK with hot water.Scrape the area as best you can to smooth where the edge is, sand the rest of it smooth. If that does not give you a smooth enough transition, just skim the area with regular joint compound, sand smooth and clean. Apply Gardz to the whole area and paint.
Amycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 09:38 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 291
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
Not meaning to cause sparks, but have you ever actually done that on a wall before? You will have to shorten at least 2 baseboards on adjoining walls. You will more than likely have to replace the plug and switch boxes screws if not the boxes themselves. There is a door jam just to the right I assume so now you need a jam extension. You now need to tape & float the wall as well as onto the adjoining walls and ceiling.

Pull the mesh wallpaper, sand the line where the paint stopped and then prime. Smooth wall with joint compound as needed.
Either way it's a lot of work. By the time the walls are primed, patched, sanded, skim coated, sanded, primed, painted, etc you can often simply apply new drywall and save a few steps and have a better result.

I'd consult with the cat. He probably knows best. He's obviously been studying the situation.
hennyh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 03:48 AM   #11
paper hanger and painter
 
chrisn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hagerstown MD
Posts: 6,790
Rewards Points: 2,086
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


or just the area along the edge of the old paint where I've smoothed/sanded?

exactly!

I'd consult with the cat. He probably knows best. He's obviously been studying the situation.

The cat would say riping out the drywall is just crazy

by the way, forget "spackle" use pre mixed joint compound and Gardz
Attached Images
 

Last edited by chrisn; 06-12-2010 at 03:50 AM.
chrisn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 08:20 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 291
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post

The cat would say riping out the drywall is just crazy
The cat would remind you that the old drywall does not have to be ripped out to apply a new surface of 1/4". However I think the cat's opinion to seal, patch, sand, prime, texture and paint is probably the best approach.

Last edited by hennyh; 06-12-2010 at 08:28 AM.
hennyh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 04:20 PM   #13
Painting Company, NY
 
housepaintingny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: NY
Posts: 987
Rewards Points: 512
Blog Entries: 14
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
This is not that complicated. Strip paper using some hot water,I am betting it will come right off without ANY removal solution at all, just get a spray bottle or garden sprayer and SOAK with hot water.Scrape the area as best you can to smooth where the edge is, sand the rest of it smooth. If that does not give you a smooth enough transition, just skim the area with regular joint compound, sand smooth and clean. Apply Gardz to the whole area and paint.
I vote for this method, that's how I would do it.
housepaintingny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 08:05 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 48
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


The wallpaper came off with just water. I've scraped down the edge of the old paint to make a smoother transition.

At the end of the areas I've exposed, there is a white powdery substance under the top layer of red paint. I can rub it off with my fingertip. It doesn't feel like old horsehair plaster in the ceiling -- it makes a fine powder, no chunks. Is this a skim coat of plaster? Something else?

I'm curious as to whether this white stuff will hold new coats of primer and paint. I'm thinking using a neighbor's palm sander to smooth the transition, not bothering with mesh, joint compound, or spackle before priming. I don't want to sand it all smooth, paint, and then have the surface underneath degrade so that the paint starts buckling around the edges of a big rectangle.

Also, what do you recommend for washing the exposed drywall? It's a bit slimy when wet -- there is still some old glue that I need to get off before priming.

Thanks.
Amycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2010, 08:14 AM   #15
Learning by Doing
 
Leah Frances's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Easton, Maryland
Posts: 3,156
Rewards Points: 2,000
Blog Entries: 7
Default

Joint compound? Spackle? Or something else?


get some TSP and wash and rinse the wall until feels clean. Glad you opted for the sane and easy route. Should be no problem. Give us pics when you're done! Good job.

__________________
If I could only remember to THINK about what I was doing before I did it.
Leah Frances is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
spackle versus joint compound... joeyboy General DIY Discussions 11 02-26-2011 07:51 AM
Use joint compound, spackle, something else?? tracyballard Carpentry 0 06-08-2010 10:39 PM
Used spackle instead of joint compound on a wallboard repair--help TytusDwn General DIY Discussions 4 10-25-2009 03:43 PM
Joint compound to smooth old paint layers. gmhut Painting 1 05-03-2009 05:50 PM
Joint Compound Vs. Spackle Rze Painting 5 09-14-2007 11:09 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.