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Old 10-19-2010, 06:48 AM   #1
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Interior Sheetrock and Nicotine stains/flaking paint


My second painting question! The house had 3 heavy smokers for 25+ years. In just about every room in the house, the Paint is flaking from the walls and ceiling. (there is also some sheetrock damage from a bathroom leak in the living room and a roof leak in the front bedroom)(both have been repaired and are dry as a bone) A friend suggested that instead of trying to remove the nicotine stains and patch the leak spots to cover it all with 3/8" sheetrock. I am wondering if I were to have a painter come in and prep and primer the walls, (exluding the sheetrock repairs) would that be enough to cover nicotine stains and water damage stains?

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Old 10-19-2010, 07:14 AM   #2
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Interior Sheetrock and Nicotine stains/flaking paint


clean and prime with Bin, nothing else will do the job
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Old 10-19-2010, 04:52 PM   #3
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clean and prime with Bin, nothing else will do the job
yes
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Old 10-20-2010, 09:10 PM   #4
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yes
yes!!!!!!
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Old 10-21-2010, 08:47 AM   #5
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What should I use to clean the walls with before using zin?

TY
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Old 10-21-2010, 05:57 PM   #6
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http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...ct.do?pid=3808
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Old 10-23-2010, 01:57 AM   #7
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Interior Sheetrock and Nicotine stains/flaking paint


You can use trisodium phosphate also known as (TSP) this has been used by painters for years and years as a heavy duty degreaser and all purpose cleaner. TSP is formulated for removing Grease, soot, and lead paint dust cleanup. A washing of surfaces prior to painting helps insure a good clean "bite" for the finish coat of paint.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:05 AM   #8
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You can use trisodium phosphate also known as (TSP) this has been used by painters for years and years as a heavy duty degreaser and all purpose cleaner. TSP is formulated for removing Grease, soot, and lead paint dust cleanup. A washing of surfaces prior to painting helps insure a good clean "bite" for the finish coat of paint.
Thanks Epson! I did use the TSP in my current house when I removed the wallpaper!

The flaking paint, if I scrap this then hit it with a light coat of spackle, sand, would that work? My concern is that the uneven finish will bleed through the paint and look like lipstick on a pig!?
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Old 10-27-2010, 02:27 PM   #9
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Scrape the flaking paint off your walls and apply drywall compound (mud) not spackle to smooth out your wall. When dry, sand and apply a primer before your finish coat.
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Old 11-04-2010, 08:04 AM   #10
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Scrape the flaking paint off your walls and apply drywall compound (mud) not spackle to smooth out your wall. When dry, sand and apply a primer before your finish coat.

STUPID question!!!! What is the difference between drywall mud and spackle? I thought they were one in the same?
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Old 11-05-2010, 05:28 PM   #11
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STUPID question!!!! What is the difference between drywall mud and spackle? I thought they were one in the same?
Spackle is generally used for smaller areas, and repairs in the walls. This includes holes, stabs, or cracks. You can purchase spackle already made, or even purchase it in a powder form where you add water to make the spackle. Spackle can dry up easily if it is not used right after it is mixed, or if the tub that the already made mix is in is left out. Spackle is more for your do it yourselfer home type use when there is a small hole or dent in the wall that needs to be fixed quickly. Choosing a small tub of Spackle for around the house fixes allows you to use the Spackle for the fixes without it drying up quickly.

Joint compound on the other hand is generally used for larger repairs in walls. This can include drywall additions to previous walls. This substance takes longer to dry since it is more durable, and it might even require more than one coat. Spackling may even be needed to smooth out the surfaces of the wall once the joint compound is dry. Joint compound can be purchased in a plaster consistency, and is not offered in powder. Joint compound is mostly used to cover joints between panels in the drywall. It is also used for larger holes that also need mesh or a backing in order to repair.

The cost difference between spackle and joint compound are around the same depending on the store you purchase them from. They come in different sizes for the size of the project you have to do. Depending on what you need to finish, and how large the job is you might need either one to complete the job. Some may think they are the same substance, when indeed they do different jobs and are made from different substances to get a different effect when using it. Hope this answers your question.

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