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Old 04-21-2013, 07:28 AM   #1
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I know not for the pros here but for us beginners it seems like good info?...always thought you painted out of a paint tray and never even knew about a roller screen..lol


http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Pr...-tips/View-All

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Old 04-21-2013, 07:54 AM   #2
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Seems reasonable advice. It think you will find you still want a stable roller tray if applying a gallon of paint though. A roller grate does come in handy if painting large areas with the same color or primer.

I don't like working out of the original can or pail of paint unless I am sure I am going to use it all so pour off what you think you will need into a clean 5er if you use a grate. You just contaminate your paint if you work out of the original container. You cannot use a grate in a full one anyhow.

A grate will take some getting used to if you have been using a roller tray. It is a little "drippier" since you cannot wring excess paint out of the roller cover like you can with paint tray.

I do like that the article stressed buying a decent roller handle. Those $2 wire frame things or worthless. If you like that type at least buy a decent one with metal that will hold the spring tension. The plastic finned ones are the best IMO. Work the fins back and forth a few times before the first use or you will have trouble getting the roller cover off. You will never have one slide around on you though.

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Old 04-21-2013, 11:32 AM   #3
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I personally don't use a five and grid for interior walls. If I'm working in new construction using one color throughout over a sub-floor that's another story, or in all exterior rolling. In that scenario you're working with fives rather than gallons, and have a lot of square area to cover. It's always been my experience that unless you keep a steady level of about two gallons in a five, at least enough to hit the bottom quarter of the grid, it becomes more difficult to work with as the cover goes below the grid to reach the paint, it can get hung up under there. And then it really gets sloppy. You can get smaller grids that work in a 2.5 gallon bucket, or cut one down yourself. That's a lot less messy than a five with some of the same benefits, and better for smaller jobs.
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Old 04-21-2013, 12:09 PM   #4
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Here is another idea- I use this for my 14", but is great for 9 also-
behind the bag is a grid that in this case I have 2 wired together for more width- but they never get full of paint.
And the end, pull out the bag, clip off a corner and drain into can. I also like to turn them inside out to dry, but I have a place to do that .

Bucket is a particular mop bucket from the Box ( menards in this case)

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Old 04-21-2013, 12:18 PM   #5
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OH- and that article has the painter with the frame in his hand. The only time I don't have it on a pole ( and I have 3 sizes of adjustable shurelock poles) is when I'm in a very tight space. The pole makes everything smoother/easier/quicker.
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Old 04-21-2013, 02:56 PM   #6
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I looked at that article and did not see much that I liked. All I had to do was see paint all over the roller frame and that was enough for me. Here's what I do, for what its worth.

1. I tear the paper label off the can. This keeps paint from running down behind the label when I pour it into a pro sized tray liner.

2. I put at least three holes in the rim of the can where the lid sits with a flat tipped screw diver. This lets paint in the rim well run back into the can.

3. I always get the big stir sticks from the paint store, and I stir the paint just before and during use, even if they shook the heck out of it in the store. Its a good habit to get into, IMHO.

4. I always clean off the can with my 2 inch chisel end cut in brush just after poring paint into my pro sized tray.

5. I always work with my favorite telescoping aluminum roller handle, unless I'm in a closet.

6. I always buy the heavy duty roller handles. The last one I bought was a wooster pro with the little tabs to hold the roller in place, and it seems to work very well.

7. I use Purdy white dove 1/2 inch nap rollers. They seem to be the best to me, so far. I "Pull" the nap several times before use to remove loose nap.

8. I store my wet paint roller in a HD zip lock bag for use the next day.

I just bought a handypaintpail, made in the US for cutting in. I really like it a lot. Check it out. Made in the USA.
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Old 04-21-2013, 04:28 PM   #7
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Advantages of a tray for DIY
Easier to step in.
easier to drop when moving from spot to spot.
a lot easier to spill
more splatter when loading roller
on larger job get to refill quite often (see numbers 2and 3 above)
I have several pans and plastic liners out in the garage some never used as I feel it would be a step back to use them.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ToolSeeker View Post
Advantages of a tray for DIY
Easier to step in.
easier to drop when moving from spot to spot.
a lot easier to spill
more splatter when loading roller
on larger job get to refill quite often (see numbers 2and 3 above)
I have several pans and plastic liners out in the garage some never used as I feel it would be a step back to use them.
I try to keep the roller frame free of paint so I dont have to worry about it dripping. I have never stepped in my roller try, but I guess its definitely possible. I don't usually move a tray when full, I place it where I want for an area, then fill it with just enough for that area.

How do you keep the dipped frame from dripping all over the place?
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:08 PM   #9
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Don't dip the frame, just get the nap wet.
As with most things, there is a technique.

BTW- I use dem all. Depends on the size of the job.
If you have to walk back and forth from your paint source- you are wasting time and movement.

It's like a martial art.. grasshopper!
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Old 04-21-2013, 06:47 PM   #10
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It must be another regional thing, I can't say I've ever seen a pro use a five and grid doing occupied residential interior repaints. I use the large pans that comfortably hold close to a gallon, and they rarely need to be refilled on a trip around an average size room. I put the pan on the floor ahead of me and as I go forward I push it with top of my foot. I can dip into a pan from a number of directions and distances if I'm on an extension pole, can't do that with a five/grid. You have to be right over top of it. I have stepped in a tray, once, and that's all it takes to learn. I've never really had a problem with splashing or spilling, but I did see a guy drop a roller on a pole in a five/grid and it fell over and spilled, luckily it was outside. There are pros and cons to both. I've used both extensively, and I just think pans are easier and cleaner.
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Old 04-21-2013, 07:04 PM   #11
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When I'm rolling or back rolling I use a 5 gallon bucket and grid.
Rarely do I ever use a paint tray.
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:02 PM   #12
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One thing you guys are forgetting is you are painters and work with paint all the time.
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:28 PM   #13
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One thing you guys are forgetting is you are painters and work with paint all the time.
Not sure which "guys", the pro pan or pro bucket, you are talking about, but it's just a matter of preference and job situation/requirement. If the day's material is 2-3 gallons a pan is fine. If it's 2-3 fives of material to be rolled then a bucket and grid are called for. I don't do a lot 2-3 fives of material jobs. If Mixalot is backrolling, someone is spraying, and sprayers are working out of fives, not single gallons. If the entire two coat job only requires one to two gallons a bucket is way overkill, IMO.
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Old 04-21-2013, 08:36 PM   #14
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Ok.Ok. I have a bucket fetish.

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Old 04-21-2013, 08:39 PM   #15
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Ok.Ok. I have a bucket fetish.



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