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Old 12-08-2011, 09:14 PM   #1
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I'm so mad...


We bought a 1925 craftsman house about 6 months ago and I have been doing a fairly extensive renovation on it, opening up some load bearing walls, redoing the kitchen and downstairs powder room, and basically refreshing the entire first floor.

Well, I'm at the painting stage and as I start to prepare the old existing trim for new paint it instantly became obvious that the prior owner, in preparing to sell the house, slapped a coat of cheap latex on everything without proper preparation. It's coming off like $*%&@*$ rubber cement when I sand to degloss, and I can peel up big strips grabbed by the end with my fingers in places, yet is not so failed that it comes off with duct tape.

What a PITA. Right now I'm thinking that I have to paint over it as to try and remove it all would literally take months.

I can't believe people do that to "freshen up" a house for sale. It's criminal. Shame on me for not having inspected it a little closer prior to purchase but not sure what I would have done anyway.

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Old 12-09-2011, 02:46 AM   #2
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I'm so mad...


Would it not be easier to just replace it all while you are in the restoration process? Painting over it will just make it worse. People are pigs

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Old 12-09-2011, 09:18 AM   #3
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I'm so mad...


It's borderline as far as bonding goes and it would be exponentially more work to strip it. It's on 19 double hung windows, 6 panel doors and trim, and the baseboard.

I'm going to move forward with painting it with the knowledge that I might need to bite the bullet and do it right down the road. The pity is that under this most recent crappy coat all the wood work is in great shape. It had been painted with care and not too often.

The previous owner was too old of have done the painting himself, and I bet the real estate agent gave him the name of some hack painter that she uses for precisely these circumstances. She lives a block away. I'll make a point of *****ing at her when I next see her.
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Old 12-09-2011, 09:24 AM   #4
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I'm so mad...


Depending on the trim, it may be easier, and not too expensive to replace it. I had the same thing with my house. I knew about it when I bought the house as it was obvious this is what the seller had done. However, we planned to repaint/remodel many of the rooms anyways so we didn't mind too much. When it came time to do each room, we replaced much of the simpler, non decorative molding and trim, and only stripped that which was harder or more costly to replace, such as some of the more detailed crown molding and window casings. In the end it really became a balance of how much time and effort we wanted to spend stripping paint vs. the cost of new trim.
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Old 12-09-2011, 03:27 PM   #5
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I'm so mad...


I've been there - I know your outrage - in my case it's '70s knockdown texture over the classic plaster walls. Sticks well enough to be a pita to get off but not stuck well enough to just skim over. In your situation, I would try a heat gun on low setting and try to finesse off just that top layer. Once you get the technique and if your trim is the right profile, you might be surprised at how fast it can go.
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Old 12-09-2011, 05:11 PM   #6
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I'm so mad...


Pop it all off: label each piece A, B, C, D or whatever - and the window it came from. Rent a sand blaster - blast it off. Reapply.

Done
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Old 12-09-2011, 08:09 PM   #7
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I'm so mad...


I REALLY wish "Painting-to-sell" was outlawed in some respects!!!

>>> It's always done so cheaply, with little to NO prep., often with crap materials.
>>> Then the headache begins for the new HO!!!

I wish Realtors would read threads like this!!!

(Well....at least the home will "LOOK" good for 15 min. or so....)

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Old 12-09-2011, 08:27 PM   #8
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I'm so mad...


Hey Faron, this is off the subject but I was reading your post and noticed you are from North Dakota. Is that a baby polar bear laying there, hes so cute. LOL
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Old 12-09-2011, 08:39 PM   #9
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I'm so mad...


Yep, we live in Fargo, ND. Grew up in Eastern ND....so I'm a "Lifer" here in the land of -30 winter temps sometimes!
Odd year this Fall though....NO snow yet!!! Only little "dustings" here & there.

The little avatar is our Samoyed "Callie"! She was born mid-Sept. 2 yrs. ago. She was barely 3 months old in that pic I think...
It was so damn cute...She'd always trot over to that Patio-door spot for her naps, and lay on that little blanket that She came home with!
Yeah....I aways call Her "Our little Polar-Bear"!

>>> Back to the OP's issue now...Sorry! <<<

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Old 12-09-2011, 09:53 PM   #10
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I'm so mad...


So...........
Why can't you strip the paint?
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Old 12-09-2011, 10:29 PM   #11
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I'm so mad...


If the woodwork is in great shape I would think about stripping it. Try a really sharp contour scraper first and the kind you pull toward you. You may be surprised at how fast it goes. Next thing to try would be one of the newer gel strippers. Or, when still doing such work a invested in an infrared stripper to go with SHARP scraper blades and it worked like a charm. There was also a woman who did some work for me. She had a system that separated the paint from the solvents in the stripper and she was licensed for abatement. Do be careful as you probably have some lead paint under things like the crappy coat.

As for your frustration in the crappy job I share it. Not much we can expect when we bombard the airwaves with house staging and flipping shows just to glamorize how shoddy work is obviously tolerate. Some of those shows really got me angry because they almost turned the people pulling such things to idols for hero worship or something.

Last edited by user1007; 12-09-2011 at 10:33 PM.
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Old 12-09-2011, 10:32 PM   #12
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I'm so mad...


Citris gel.
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Old 12-09-2011, 10:37 PM   #13
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I'm so mad...


I agree with last post, if you try to take all the woodwork off, chances are, you will just mess up drywall or plaster and possibly ruin the wood, as it is old and seasoned and prone to split. Absolutely do any repairs to wood like this by predrilling first always. Try what last post said. Good Luck!
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Old 12-11-2011, 04:58 AM   #14
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I'm so mad...


Without a picture of the trim I assume being circa 1925 it will be hard to replace without alot of extra expense and like was commented you could be opening up a Pandoras Box of other problems as far as wall damage. Now is the time to bite the bullet and address it. Isnt a quick coat for now what started your problem in the first place? I have used the heat gun method with success before. If you are careful to just heat the surface enough the failing surface coat will bubble and can be removed from the well bonded(oil?) previous coat. I would try this first, the heat guns are cheap and the mess is mininal. If you use chemical strippers they will act on all paint and you will be stripping down to the bare wood and all the coats applied over the last 86 years.
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Old 12-11-2011, 07:02 AM   #15
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I'm so mad...


I say again, gel strip or rent an infrared thing. Or buy one. I sold mine for almost what I paid for it when I got out of the business.

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