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Old 09-04-2015, 09:09 AM   #1
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I also have white chaulky powder on bedroom walls


I have a problem. I have wallpaper over top of plaster walls and the wall paper is starting to fall apart and their is a bubbling going on the walls and around the air vents. Can you help me with this? Also, how to stop it and get rid of it? Thank you!

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Old 09-04-2015, 03:13 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by florida1641 View Post
I have a problem. I have wallpaper over top of plaster walls and the wall paper is starting to fall apart and their is a bubbling going on the walls and around the air vents. Can you help me with this? Also, how to stop it and get rid of it? Thank you!
You should probably start a new thread to get more responses to your question.

Sounds like it's time to strip off the wallpaper and do something new with your walls. If you don't want to remove the paper, you're going to have to wet the areas that are peeling up to make the paper more pliable and then get some wallpaper adhesive and re-stick those loose areas down. Bubbled areas need to be scored with a razor and adhesive injected into that area to re-secure the paper to the wall. That's about all you can do in an instance like this.

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Old 09-04-2015, 10:37 PM   #3
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Until now, I have never heard of "Frosting". But, it apparently exists:

http://www.benjaminmoore.ca/en-us/fo...-home/frosting

Frosting seems to be similar in every respect to "chaulking". Chaulking is the degradation of exterior paint binders because of exposure to UV light from the Sun. The result is that the surface of the binder breaks down into a whitish powder which you can wipe off with your hand. That white powder will contain loose coloured pigments that were in the paint, and so the powder won't be pure white, but tinted somewhat to the original colour of the paint.

When you wipe your hand over chaulked paint, you get dust on your hand just the same as if you'd wiped your hand over a dirty school room chaulk board. That's where the term "chaulking" comes from.

The fix for chaulking is to wipe the dust off as best you can, and then prime with an alkyd primer. It's important that the primer be alkyd because latex paints and latex primers can have a lot of tension in them as they form a film, and that tension can be enough to cause the primer or paint to pull off of a poorly consolidated surface like chaulked paint. Alkyd primers and paints don't develop any tension in the film as they cure, and so they won't peel off the surface like a latex product might. That lack of tension in the film is also why alkyd primer are generally better at consolidating the surface of chaulked paint so that it holds together properly.

I note that BM also recommends priming with an alkyd primer for fixing "frosted" paint.

PS: all you need to know about wet T-Shirt contests:

The reason why wet cotton is more transparent than dry cotton is because light travels a STRAIGHTER path through wet cotton than dry cotton.

The refractive index of air is 1.00
The refractive index of water is 1.33
The refractive index of cotton is 1.57 to 1.58

The greater the difference in refractive indices across an interface, the more light will bend as it passes through that interface. So, light travels in a STRAIGHTER line through wet cotton than dry cotton cuz the refractive indices of water and cotton are closer together than air and cotton.

Or, perhaps a better way to look at is is that light traveling though wet cotton behaves more like it would if the wet cotton weren't even there.

You can prove this to yourself by putting a drop of water on a paper towel. The spot that got wet will look darker than the rest of the towel. Now, hold the paper towel up to a light. That same spot will now be brighter than the rest of the towel. The reason for the spot being darker is because light travels a straighter path through wet cellulose (and cotton is 99% cellulose and paper is mostly (75ish%) cellulose) than it does through dry cellulose. So, more light passes through a wet paper towel than through a dry paper towel. That;s the reason why the spot looked dark until you held the paper towel up to a light.
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Old 09-05-2015, 11:07 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
Until now, I have never heard of "Frosting". But, it apparently exists:

http://www.benjaminmoore.ca/en-us/fo...-home/frosting

Frosting seems to be similar in every respect to "chaulking". Chaulking is the degradation of exterior paint binders because of exposure to UV light from the Sun. The result is that the surface of the binder breaks down into a whitish powder which you can wipe off with your hand. That white powder will contain loose coloured pigments that were in the paint, and so the powder won't be pure white, but tinted somewhat to the original colour of the paint.

When you wipe your hand over chaulked paint, you get dust on your hand just the same as if you'd wiped your hand over a dirty school room chaulk board. That's where the term "chaulking" comes from.

The fix for chaulking is to wipe the dust off as best you can, and then prime with an alkyd primer. It's important that the primer be alkyd because latex paints and latex primers can have a lot of tension in them as they form a film, and that tension can be enough to cause the primer or paint to pull off of a poorly consolidated surface like chaulked paint. Alkyd primers and paints don't develop any tension in the film as they cure, and so they won't peel off the surface like a latex product might. That lack of tension in the film is also why alkyd primer are generally better at consolidating the surface of chaulked paint so that it holds together properly.

I note that BM also recommends priming with an alkyd primer for fixing "frosted" paint.

PS: all you need to know about wet T-Shirt contests:

The reason why wet cotton is more transparent than dry cotton is because light travels a STRAIGHTER path through wet cotton than dry cotton.

The refractive index of air is 1.00
The refractive index of water is 1.33
The refractive index of cotton is 1.57 to 1.58

The greater the difference in refractive indices across an interface, the more light will bend as it passes through that interface. So, light travels in a STRAIGHTER line through wet cotton than dry cotton cuz the refractive indices of water and cotton are closer together than air and cotton.

Or, perhaps a better way to look at is is that light traveling though wet cotton behaves more like it would if the wet cotton weren't even there.

You can prove this to yourself by putting a drop of water on a paper towel. The spot that got wet will look darker than the rest of the towel. Now, hold the paper towel up to a light. That same spot will now be brighter than the rest of the towel. The reason for the spot being darker is because light travels a straighter path through wet cellulose (and cotton is 99% cellulose and paper is mostly (75ish%) cellulose) than it does through dry cellulose. So, more light passes through a wet paper towel than through a dry paper towel. That;s the reason why the spot looked dark until you held the paper towel up to a light.
I'm usually too distracted to even think about why the cotton becomes transparent when it's wet. I'm just glad it is!
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Old 09-05-2015, 02:05 PM   #5
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Made this its own thread.
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