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Old 02-05-2012, 10:42 PM   #16
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
But it does not void the warranty and there is no documentation that says so. It boils down to this. Warranty only covers paint, which is typicly 10-15% of the cost of a job at best. Emulsabond is added security. Would you rather be more concerned with the 15% cost of a job that rarely ever gets called into play, or the 85%.
Ok...now this goes back to what I was talking about earlier. Let's say you painted a person's home for $10,000. The brand you used was a national brand acrylic, warranted for 20 years against fading and peeling. Because of the type of application you decided to "add security" by blending EB into the paint. You do the necessary surface prep (clean to sspc-sp1), then finish project in your normal manner.

3 years later, the homeowner brings a lawsuit, naming you and the national brand as responsible parties to remedy the paint job on her house which is now faded and peeling in spots. The court won't particularly be interested in what you or the national company says you/they will or will not cover in a generally worded warranty, so they hire a guy like me to determine the probably cause for the product "failing" as it has.

My report says - Surface Prep was adequate, paint was applied in a proper manner and of uniform consistency, so no problems there. In my report though, I mention the product applied was an alkyd modified acrylic (which is what EB is - alkyd modification) and is behaving in a manner typical and expected of an alkyd modified product.

Of course the national paint manufacturer will point out that their product is not alkyd modified, but a solid acrylic...

The court decides for the plaintiff because the homeowner bought your services in good faith and awards a pro-rated judgement of $8,500 to be paid by you and/or the national paint company - no punitive damages awarded. The plaintiff decides they want a cash settlement instead of a repaint job by you, nor do they want paint supplied by this particular manufacturer.

Do you still really think the national company is gonna honor their warranty to you when the modification may have, at least, contributed to the problem? (BTW, this scenario is NOT hypothetical - but actual).

While not a typical story, these cases do happen (again, trust me). So I'm back to my original series of questions.

...and whether I'm right or wrong about the voided warranty (I'm right, btw), would a situation as I've described above, make you more or less apt to continue with the system you've used up to now?

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Old 02-06-2012, 01:37 PM   #17
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


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Originally Posted by ric knows paint View Post
Ok...now this goes back to what I was talking about earlier. Let's say you painted a person's home for $10,000. The brand you used was a national brand acrylic, warranted for 20 years against fading and peeling. Because of the type of application you decided to "add security" by blending EB into the paint. You do the necessary surface prep (clean to sspc-sp1), then finish project in your normal manner.

3 years later, the homeowner brings a lawsuit, naming you and the national brand as responsible parties to remedy the paint job on her house which is now faded and peeling in spots. The court won't particularly be interested in what you or the national company says you/they will or will not cover in a generally worded warranty, so they hire a guy like me to determine the probably cause for the product "failing" as it has.

My report says - Surface Prep was adequate, paint was applied in a proper manner and of uniform consistency, so no problems there. In my report though, I mention the product applied was an alkyd modified acrylic (which is what EB is - alkyd modification) and is behaving in a manner typical and expected of an alkyd modified product.

Of course the national paint manufacturer will point out that their product is not alkyd modified, but a solid acrylic...

The court decides for the plaintiff because the homeowner bought your services in good faith and awards a pro-rated judgement of $8,500 to be paid by you and/or the national paint company - no punitive damages awarded. The plaintiff decides they want a cash settlement instead of a repaint job by you, nor do they want paint supplied by this particular manufacturer.

Do you still really think the national company is gonna honor their warranty to you when the modification may have, at least, contributed to the problem? (BTW, this scenario is NOT hypothetical - but actual).

While not a typical story, these cases do happen (again, trust me). So I'm back to my original series of questions.

...and whether I'm right or wrong about the voided warranty (I'm right, btw), would a situation as I've described above, make you more or less apt to continue with the system you've used up to now?
EB is added insurance that you won't end up in court. You can go with no EB and have the paint fail miserably and the paint manufacturers will almost always point to poor preperation and then you are left holding the bag. In the very very unlikely event you get taken to court over a job you used EB on, then you can get testimony after testimony of how EB works from professionals.

EB is the industry standard around here. Just driving down my street which has 30 or so houses on it you will probably see 15 alluminum siding houses. This whole area is full of them.
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:49 PM   #18
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


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Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
EB is added insurance that you won't end up in court. You can go with no EB and have the paint fail miserably and the paint manufacturers will almost always point to poor preperation and then you are left holding the bag. In the very very unlikely event you get taken to court over a job you used EB on, then you can get testimony after testimony of how EB works from professionals.

EB is the industry standard around here. Just driving down my street which has 30 or so houses on it you will probably see 15 alluminum siding houses. This whole area is full of them.
I have apparently failed to make my point clear...I appreciate your comments and discussion, though.
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Old 02-29-2012, 02:26 PM   #19
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


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Its very important to clean aluminum siding thorough before painting. Aluminum siding breaks down over time, it oxidizes leaving a white, powdery chalk substance behind. This chalk needs to be removed. I prefer using tsp, a nylon deck brush and low pressure to clean.
It is not necessary to prime aluminum unless there are bare spots of aluminum. You will want to prime with a quality bonding primer that is water bourne.
You can paint aluminum with any quality 100% acrylic water bourne paint. I would use a water bourne paint, as aluminum expands and contracts with the change in temperature. A quality water bourne paint has properties to contract and expand too. An oil base paint will not contract and expand as easily and eventually leads to the paint becoming brittle and cracking.

<Just researching and planning way ahead for having to do this... >


Your post confused me a little...

Just the part where it says primer is not necessary unless there are bare spots of aluminum.

I guess that is because the OP doesn't have any chipping in his paint? (so there wouldn't be any bare aluminum).. is this correct?

The home I'm buying (tonight) has aluminum siding. It has chipping paint in some places, and just really looks old.

I will be correcting this... at first I thought I would have to replace all the siding... but I'm thinking it might be cheaper to just paint it?

Would I need to remove the old paint entirely, (since it's chipping in some places), prime the whole house, then paint, or could I just remove the paint from the sections that are chipping (getting rid of the paint in places where there is chipping but leaving the paint that is still intact), prime the whole house then paint... ?


Thanks!
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:32 PM   #20
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


you say it's chipping,but is it really peeling?there are issues with pvc coated siding peeling and most likely your money would be better spent on replacement
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:51 PM   #21
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How to repaint aluminum siding??


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Originally Posted by Jschall View Post
<Just researching and planning way ahead for having to do this... >


Your post confused me a little...

Just the part where it says primer is not necessary unless there are bare spots of aluminum.

I guess that is because the OP doesn't have any chipping in his paint? (so there wouldn't be any bare aluminum).. is this correct?

The home I'm buying (tonight) has aluminum siding. It has chipping paint in some places, and just really looks old.

I will be correcting this... at first I thought I would have to replace all the siding... but I'm thinking it might be cheaper to just paint it?

Would I need to remove the old paint entirely, (since it's chipping in some places), prime the whole house, then paint, or could I just remove the paint from the sections that are chipping (getting rid of the paint in places where there is chipping but leaving the paint that is still intact), prime the whole house then paint... ?


Thanks!
I was saying that when re-paining aluminum siding you have to prime any bare, raw areas. If your siding is chipped, peeling, flaking ect you will need to resolve that getting those surfaces to sound paint. If need you could use something like Bondo to fill in areas. If you have any aluminum siding that is raw or bare then you need to prime. If the factory paint is good then you don't need to prime. Its important to clean well.

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