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Old 07-25-2013, 10:34 PM   #1
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


I was recently traveling in Australia and noticed these on the Harry Potter store in the theme park we were visiting. We have the exact same style of lights on our house, and I love the antiqued look these have, even the glass. I was hoping to get something similar to this on my lights. Any suggestions?




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Old 07-26-2013, 02:10 AM   #2
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


Those appear to be antiques unless they are knockoff reproductions, the way to get a look like that is with paints and techniques, or real metals given a chemical patina.

Antique fixtures of this type sell for many thousands of dollars and are usually bronze or cast iron.

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Old 07-26-2013, 06:36 AM   #3
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


sure looks like plain ole' rust to me.
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Old 07-26-2013, 07:25 AM   #4
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


The color of the metal puts me in mind of Rubbed Bronze spray paint.. Might be a place to start. The distressing would be the key to making it look old.
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:03 AM   #5
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthewt1970 View Post
sure looks like plain ole' rust to me.
You would be amazed what artists that know what they are doing, can do with paints. Also chemicals can be used, to create rust, Patena, etc.. No, what they did was use artists to create aged look on the lamps.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:28 AM   #6
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How to recreate this on outdoor sconces


I tend to agree those fixtures look like real antiques. Or at least real metal that was neglected and rusted. If yours are the same and not new knockoffs, you could really mess up the value mickey mousing around with them. So consult an antique dealer or lighting fixture restoration company before proceeding.

The only thing that makes me think those are contemporary, and not authentic, is most that shape from the day would have been gaslights and converted to electricity. Whatever they are, they are rather cool though.

As for achieving the look on newer fixtures? Artisans do it all the time with a variety of materials and techniques ranging from paints and glazes to chemicals like mentioned that accelerate the patina or oxidation processes. There are of course metal leafs (thin sheets of pounded metal) that can be applied. There are metal flakes suspended in wax you can rub on and rub off in colors like gold, silver, copper, etc. You might see if your library has some decent books on faux finish techniques.

As for the glass, the same issue applies. You can try glass stains but I would worry about constant heat and cooling from even a CFL bulb like the one you showed. A specialty glass shop will have recommendations. There are glass coatings you can bake on. But again, if your fixtures are antique be careful messing with them.

And while the look may be appealing? Rust and corrosion will effect the life of the fixture at some point.

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