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Old 08-22-2013, 11:04 PM   #16
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


Thanks man you've been a huge help. If I had to take a guess, I would guess that its row 2, number 13. On your chart. Could be darker though, not sure.

Every monitor is different, so I'm not entirely sure I would trust using a monitor to match. Perhaps I would be better off printing it out of a high quality printer, onto photo paper or other high quality paper. Although, I'm sure that's all subject to the same rule.

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Old 08-23-2013, 06:46 AM   #17
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


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Originally Posted by Bennylava View Post
Thanks man you've been a huge help. If I had to take a guess, I would guess that its row 2, number 13. On your chart. Could be darker though, not sure.

Every monitor is different, so I'm not entirely sure I would trust using a monitor to match. Perhaps I would be better off printing it out of a high quality printer, onto photo paper or other high quality paper. Although, I'm sure that's all subject to the same rule.
Do correct your monitor to 6500K---standard for color. There will be a setting for this in your SETTINGS menu. It will at least put your monitor closer to the standard but you are correct, even then each is different. So I consider the computer based explorations the starting point. You still have to visit the paint store to tweak choices. Even then I often order large swatches of paint color for clients or have them buy those sample bottles or even a quart of something so they can make sure they like it in the lighting they have availed before buying gallons of stuff.

I forgot to mention that you can print out a square swatch if your printer is reasonably accurate (or you like the output color in any event). Then take the print out to a paint store with a scanner and they can custom match the printed swatch. If my charts print large enough, you can just take them to the store.

Another option, if you use the charts I provided you? Just use a free pixel grabber to get the color code. Then use any graphic program (I use the DRAW program in Open Office which is free) to make a square of reasonable size. Choose the color code to fill the square with the desired color and print.

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Old 08-23-2013, 01:06 PM   #18
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


This is where it pays to go down to your local Michaels or JoAn and pick up some craft paint and play with it on a throwaway garage sale find. There are literally millions and millions of color combinations/techniques possible. What you have to find out is the look that appeals to you if you're going to DIY it. If you're going to pay a pro to do it, get ready to open your wallet wide. It's expensive, as it's VERY labor intensive. But, if you want them to do it, then let them show you a few base coat/top glaze combos and then pick from that. Otherwise, take a few weeks and do the experimenting. It will give you a whole new appreciation as for why a glaze is usually a 20% upcharge in a cabinet line!
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:08 PM   #19
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


Well I was going to paint them myself, and then try to save a bunch of money by hiring a skilled airbrusher off of craigslist.
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Old 08-23-2013, 07:00 PM   #20
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


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Well I was going to paint them myself, and then try to save a bunch of money by hiring a skilled airbrusher off of craigslist.
Before you get to far along, you might want to advertise for the airbrusher to see what kind of paint they are willing to spray through a nice airbrush. I used acrylics at times but they made me nervous and really preferred oil based enamels for applications like yours. Perhaps an acrylic automotive finish would work but the needles and tips are so fine acrylics can really raise havoc.

I am just bringing it up so you do not end up with a paint compatibility issue between the base coat you apply and paint over the top. Either oil or acrylic should stick nicely to something like the new Benjamin Moore Advance product if it can be tinted to the color you need. It is a waterborne product but leaves an alkyd film.
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Old 08-23-2013, 09:45 PM   #21
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


I REALLY wouldn't recommend airbrushing a glaze. The glazing you show in the picture is a flood glaze that is applied, then hand wiped. The amount that is wiped, and the direction and material that you use to wipe it controls the color of both the base coat that is revealed by the wiping and the accent that is left in the crevices.

There is also "pen" glazing, that is usually done with a paint pen, not an air brush. It too gets select wiping, but what differentiates it from flood glazing is that it's only applied to the crevices and thus doesn't change the color of the base coat at all. It's "crisper", but it's also much less "authentic" looking if you want the piece to appear as if it has genuine age and dirt to it.

This can definitely be a DIY project, but, you have to PRACTICE it a good deal first. Craft paint is cheap, and you can do a lot of experimenting with it to see how your motions affect the color that you get.

Don't forget the proper prep work for a strongly adhering and smooth basecoat under the glaze! As with all paint jobs, that's the really important work, and it's why a professional job costs what it costs. If you don't get that right, the glaze will only highlight all of your imperfections.
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:55 PM   #22
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


I have to agree with Live oak.

Airbrushing could look nice I'm sure, but the look in the pics is wiped glaze.
It's really not that hard. If you are willing to tackle painting the cabs, doing the glaze wouldn't be that much extra work.

Maybe practice on the back side of the doors or something. It's really just 'glaze on / glaze off' how much you take off is the trick.
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Old 08-24-2013, 01:52 AM   #23
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


Do you think that is glaze, or just some type of strange, printed sticker? Like a laminate that they printed out and stuck on the cabinets, maybe.

It seems like it would be very difficult to glaze it just like they did. Notice they even have more glaze around the handles, to give it a more used look.

I take it that glaze is transparent?
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:24 AM   #24
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


As suggested, it would not cost you much to experiment? I don't have a lot of faith in the quality of most hobby store chain paints. I would get your materials at a real paint store or a real artists supply store.
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Old 08-24-2013, 01:34 PM   #25
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


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I would get your materials at a real paint store or a real artists supply store.
Oh I agree with that for the materials for the job itself. You don't want to be using craft paint for cabinets. Just the practicing. Craft stores offer paint and glaze in $1 2 oz. portions, so it makes it easy to experiment with a wide variety of base colors and top glazes without investing a lot of money into quarts to do it. It also lets the OP decide if this is actually something he wants to do himself or pay someone to do. It IS pretty labor intensive to do the correct prep for painting all the way through the glaze and topcoat steps.

Back in the 80's when glazing was huge the first time, I had a side business doing decorative paint treatments for furniture and cabinets. Even then, it was a good way to make a good chunk of change as it commanded a premium. It still does. To get a decorative painter to "just" do the glazing and top coating on an already painted kitchen isn't going to be cheap. I used to get 2-3K per kitchen "just" to glaze existing cabinets, and time has done nothing but make the labor rate go up.
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Old 08-24-2013, 07:00 PM   #26
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


That's why I'm considering the air brusher instead of the glazer. I don't have much faith in my own ability to do it myself. I can spray the cabinets, no problem. I doubt I can glaze with the level of skill that is shown in those pics. I am not a professional, I do not have the time nor the desire to get as good as it would take to make my cabinets look as good as my original pictures.

I'm but a lowly DIY'er, and when I've tried to do the high skilled aspects of home renovation, it hasn't turned out well.

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Old 08-24-2013, 08:35 PM   #27
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


Get airbrushing out of your head. You aren't going to get that look with airbrushing. It's neither the correct tool nor the correct technique. Got it?

Pros get to be pros by a lot of practice. It's how DIYers learn to do stuff too. If you won't invest $20 and some time doing just that, then you won't have the skill level to do that either. But, if you DO spend some time and effort, then you CAN do it.

Otherwise, just do the sanding, priming, and painting, and leave off the glaze. That is the current popular look. Without the glaze. You can always glaze it later if you decide you still want the look. After you've had the time to practice.

Seriously, if you have the needed skill to do a correct job painting those cabinets, then you can glaze them.
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Old 08-25-2013, 12:00 AM   #28
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


I could do that look with an airbrush or two in a heartbeat. But your point is well taken and OP I think with some practice and experimentation you could pull off a nice hand glazing effect.
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Old 08-28-2013, 03:30 AM   #29
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


After looking into it further, it seems there is an airbrusher in my town that specializes in cabinets. So I'm not sure that guy is up to speed on all the modern techniques. I went by his store after work and he's got several examples of the cabinets and other furniture that he's done, it looks very professionally done. Like you he said for what I'm describing it would be perfectly doable and he's done it many times.

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Old 08-29-2013, 11:18 PM   #30
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How to paint professional looking antiquing?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bennylava
After looking into it further, it seems there is an airbrusher in my town that specializes in cabinets. So I'm not sure that guy is up to speed on all the modern techniques. I went by his store after work and he's got several examples of the cabinets and other furniture that he's done, it looks very professionally done. Like you he said for what I'm describing it would be perfectly doable and he's done it many times.
That's interesting. Please post some pics if the airbrushing thing works out.

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