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-   -   How to paint professional looking antiquing? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/how-paint-professional-looking-antiquing-185573/)

Bennylava 08-19-2013 07:11 PM

How to paint professional looking antiquing?
 
I'm sure you've all been to Lowes, or a professional cabinet shop, and seen the professional looking antiuqing jobs. Is there a special process to painting this? I know there must be, but what is the best way to go about it? Here is a few pics of what I'm wanting to do to my kitchen cabinets. Notice how the lines and seams kind of fade into a darker color. Makes them look old, but they're still new.


http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/...819_134003.jpg


http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/...819_134011.jpg


http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/...819_134021.jpg


http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/...819_134026.jpg

BigJim 08-19-2013 08:51 PM

1 Attachment(s)
We used a tea stain on our cabinets which is an aging process. It looks like latex paint but it drys totally different from what it looks like in the can. You leave it thick in the corners and crevices to make it look antiqued. This is how ours turned out, this is the valance over our kitchen window.

Bennylava 08-19-2013 09:22 PM

Very nice. But I should have specified, I'll be going with a variant of white, as the pics show.

Jmayspaint 08-20-2013 07:52 AM

The pics in the OP look like glazing to me.

Glazing is a method where a dark colored 'glaze' is applied over a lighter base color, then immediately wiped off. The darker color is wiped off the large flat areas for the most part, and is left in the detailed areas and inside corners.

Its not an incredibly difficult look to achieve, but it takes practice to get a consistent look over a whole set of cabs.

Search 'glazing', there are probably many instructional vids out there.

Bennylava 08-20-2013 12:29 PM

Thank you very much. Are there professional cabinet shops that will glaze my cabinets? Sound like something I might want to get right the first time. I could do all the prep work to the cabinets, including painting them. And then have the professionals come in and do the glazing, and save some money that way.

Jmayspaint 08-20-2013 01:21 PM

My experience with glazing was in a cabinet shop as part of a pigmented lacquer system. I'm sure the ones at lowes are the same.

I have read about faux painters doing it with painted cabinets. Might have better luck trying to hire a painter that specializes in faux finishes, rather than a cabinet shop.

ddj26377 08-20-2013 02:24 PM

I've never done it, and don't know very much about it but I've been browsing this forum for a couple of days and came across this post:

http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/tips-g...abinets-59602/

She's done pretty much what you're talking about and posted the pictures of her finished kitchen. It looks great!

ToolSeeker 08-20-2013 04:38 PM

Gee dummy me I like the look of the cabinets.

user1007 08-20-2013 05:23 PM

I would say read up on making your own glazes as the pre-mixed ones can be pricey. Then mix a little and try the back side of a door or something and see if you are up to the task.

Make sure to write down your formulas so you can match glazes as you go. I think you may find the working times for acrylics too fast although you can get extenders and retarders at a real art store. You may find working with oil based products a better choice for this since you will not be racing them drying so fast.

Somebody handy with an airbrush and even basic skills with it could knock out the specific look you show without much trouble.

Your library, by the way, should have books on faux finishing more helpful than your online finds.

Bennylava 08-21-2013 02:06 PM

Never thought of that! An airbrusher would be perfect. I can probably find a skilled air brusher on craigslist.

But now I must ask... If I do have the darker stuff airbrushed on, what color is the white? Is clearly an off white, but its SO off white, that it borders on a creme color. What color is the white? How could I find it? I don't think I can take one of their cabinet doors off, and take it to the paint counter to get it matched.

user1007 08-21-2013 02:21 PM

Your Benjamin Moore dealer will have a color fan of off whites with over 100 variations in it. I am sure they will lend you one to borrow. Take it with you to make the match.

If your digital camera is accurate you might get away with taking a picture and grabbing the RGB color codes both the off white and the darkest trim of the photo. Then go to easyrgb.com. Type in the code, pick a paint collection and the system will kick out the four closest matches in the collection. It is a good starting point.

Exotic colors and Color Grab are two free apps that do the same thing on an Android phone. I will say that off whites are trickier than deeper colors. The color fan would be best.

If the photos you posted are close to what you want and the easyrgb approach I describe seems baffling I can grab color numbers and name for you? I can get you color codes for Sherwin Williams, Ben Moore, Pittsburgh etc. to get you started. easyrgb does not futz with crap like Behr though.

user1007 08-21-2013 05:26 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I had a few minutes and am attaching what my pixel grabber gathered from the photos you attached. The insets in the top cabinets read much grayer and I don't know if I liked that. Neutrals are tricky because the light color can shift them but I got:

Insets in the top cabinets: R:79, G:72, B:54
Cabinet/crown main color: R:147, G:131, B:101
Dark color/glaze: R:80, G:60, B:40

What I came up with that I think would work would be sticking to one color range for the base color, the insets and the glaze. I would make the insets and the glaze one and the same.

Take a look at these two chip series in the Benjamin Moore Color Preview Collection. The second is a little more gray than the first series. My first choice would be the 2110 series just because it is a little warmer but then again, I think the 2111 series would really look sharp with stainless appliance fronts.

2110-10 Taupe to 2110-70 Vintage Taupe
2111-10 Deep Taupe to 2111-70 Calm

I can kick out codes in other company collections if you have a preference. Many of my color fans seemed to have grown feet and left home though so I will not be able to check the output. You can explore at easyrgb.com with other paint brands too. I would work from the glaze RGB code myself.

I tried to play with the Benjamin Moore Color Viewer but it was not cooperating this afternoon.

Let us know what you decide and especially how it turns out.

Bennylava 08-22-2013 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1232294)
If the photos you posted are close to what you want and the easyrgb approach I describe seems baffling I can grab color numbers and name for you? I can get you color codes for Sherwin Williams, Ben Moore, Pittsburgh etc. to get you started. easyrgb does not futz with crap like Behr though.


Man! You are awesome! There are a couple of parts that I don't quite understand though. For instance, what do those numbers mean? How does that first set of numbers translate to a color code that I can take to a paint store and have them match? I saw the second set of numbers, so I assume that you already used some other site to get the correct color codes though.

And when you said you'd make the glaze the same color as the base color. If I do that, how would you tell that there is any glaze at all? How would I achieve the darker spots?

user1007 08-22-2013 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bennylava (Post 1232557)
Man! You are awesome! There are a couple of parts that I don't quite understand though. For instance, what do those numbers mean? How does that first set of numbers translate to a color code that I can take to a paint store and have them match? I saw the second set of numbers, so I assume that you already used some other site to get the correct color codes though.

And when you said you'd make the glaze the same color as the base color. If I do that, how would you tell that there is any glaze at all? How would I achieve the darker spots?

In the pics you posted, those insets in the top cabinets seemed a different hue. I would make them the same as the darker glaze color. I would also make the glaze and the overall cabinet background the same color but the cabinet fronts a much lighter value (in this case a tint) of the color of course. Ben Moore color fan pages (and the loose versions in racks at the store) run in stepped incremental values of 10, from 10-70. They are the same color, just lighter or darker tints or shades of it. In my suggestions for you 2110-10 and 2110-70 are the same color but one chip will be very light and the other very dark with several steps between them. Same with 2111-10 and 2111-70 but the base color is different between 2110 and 2111---2111 looks cooler and more gray in lighter values of the color.

The first set of codes were the RGB (red, green, blue) codes my pixel grabber abstracted from the photos you posted. The r:80, g:60, b:40 seemed most promising to me. That is what the pixel grabber says the glaze color you showed is made of.

I then went to www.easyrgb.com. At the top of the screen you will see an option to convert RGB to commercial tints. You type in that RGB code in the boxes you will see. You will also see a window with a pull down menu for different color collections. I chose Ben Moore's Color Preview collection since that is what I used most and I had a color fan handy. You will see options for other paint brands and color collections.

Once you enter the RGB code and pick a collection, the system will return the four closest paint code numbers and color names. That is what my second series of numbers represents. They are the actual Ben Moore paint names and codes but are based on the input RGB codes I started with. I think it will make sense to you when you play with easyrgb a bit.

When using the computer to explore color you should go into the monitor settings and set the color profile to 6500K which is the industry standard for talking about color. Doing so puts everybody on the same page.

easyrgb will also let you calibrate monitor color on a session by session basis.

user1007 08-22-2013 12:55 AM

To clarify just a little bit if needed.

Every color your computer monitor displays is made up of the three primary broadcast colors---Red, green and blue. This is where the RGB code comes from.

The masses of displayed color are really just nested pixels. So, with a free pixel grabber, you can roll over any single one on your screen and capture the RGB code that is making it the color it is. Pixel grabbers are included in lots of programs but I use the ones in PicPick and Color Cop the most on my laptop (both are free by the way). They are usually represented by an eye dropper tool. Some let you click and store codes which is nice.

Anyhow, you can grab the color of anything so if you load a photograph and then drag the pixel grabber over different areas you can capture the RGB codes. This is what I did with your cabinet photos. As mentioned, if the over all color temp is off, you may see things differently than someone else with a calibrated monitor so set yours to 6500K.

Obviously RGB doesn't work well elsewhere so for printing the codes have to be converted to the four process printing colors (like in your inkjet) of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). RGB does not help directly with paint color which is why easyrgb.com comes in handy.


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