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-   -   how to paint new cedar siding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/how-paint-new-cedar-siding-147325/)

paultull 06-17-2012 11:28 AM

how to paint new cedar siding
 
we just installd new cedar siding to our garage. what prep if any do we need to do before we paint? we want to use paint instead of stain so it will match our house color.

joecaption 06-17-2012 11:31 AM

Concider two coats of solid colored stain instead.
Less likly to peel later and will give you the same look as paint.

Gymschu 06-17-2012 12:21 PM

Cedar tends to bleed tannins out into the paint finish so you will have to prime with an OIL-based primer.........then, topcoat with 2 coats of your favorite exterior paint. My preference is SW's SuperPaint Satin.

joecaption 06-17-2012 02:01 PM

Paint just lays on the surface, stain will penatrate the wood.
http://www.sherwin-williams.com/home...r_house_stain/

ric knows paint 06-17-2012 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paultull (Post 945417)
we just installd new cedar siding to our garage. what prep if any do we need to do before we paint? we want to use paint instead of stain so it will match our house color.

Hiya Paul

Gymschu gave you the consummate advice for painting new cedar siding. Although there are a few acrylic primers on the market capable of blocking tannin bleed-thru, you really can't go wrong with the oil primer in it's stead. Then apply 2 coats of quality acrylic finish and you're good to go for many years....

While it is sort of true that 2 coats of solid stain could give you the same appearance as paint (sort of), there is absolutely no truth to the statement that a paint system would be any more likely to peel then a SC stain would - However, it is true that a paint system could literally last 2-3 times as long as a stain system would (trust me on this, I kinda know what I'm talking about). And as long as we're on the subject...it could be argued that a stain may penetrate better than a paint (and we're talking about acrylics here), but that really means nothing as it relates to the film's lifespan or a film's propensity to peel. For one to say that "paint just lays on the surface" as though it's a bad thing, really doesn't have a complete understanding of paints, stains, and the actual differences between...

user1007 06-17-2012 07:32 PM

I like Benjamin Moore's Fresh Start alkyd primer for applications like yours if painting the wood.

If you decide to use a solid stain, Sherwin Williams Woodscapes and other such acrylic products can be tinted to their color collections or you can scan a swatch of whatever you have to match your house or trim color.

I have done new or restored cedar and cypress siding with both primer and paint and a solid stain approach. With good products I think it is a bit of a toss up. The solid stain saves you the labor and cost of a primer I guess.

Tom Struble 06-17-2012 08:52 PM

nowadays it's preferable to install cedar that has been back primed and all cut edges treated before installation

dogris 06-18-2012 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gymschu (Post 945446)
Cedar tends to bleed tannins out into the paint finish so you will have to prime with an OIL-based primer

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Struble (Post 945677)
nowadays it's preferable to install cedar that has been back primed and all cut edges treated before installation


Two very sound pieces of advice. :thumbsup:

joecaption 06-18-2012 08:42 AM

I'm basing my suggestion on the fact that for the last 15 years of restoring 100 plus year old houses with wooden siding and having to deal with the 20 layers of peeling paint.
When we reside or make repairs we have been using Cabot or Sherwin Williams soild stain.
Even in the middle of the wall the repairs look just like the painted areas, and not once has it ever peeled.

Just because my opion is differerant then someone elses on how to do something does not make it wrong.

To the O/P go to a real paint store and ask them what they suggest to use on bare Cedar.

Rude, uncalled for, demeaning comments however can get you banned and gives any new members a very bad opion of the whole web site.

Paintguy 06-18-2012 09:01 AM

Oil primer, two top coats of acrylic paint - that is indeed the best system for any new wood outside (and it has been the best system for decades now).

ric knows paint 06-18-2012 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 945979)
I'm basing my suggestion on the fact that for the last 15 years of restoring 100 plus year old houses with wooden siding and having to deal with the 20 layers of peeling paint.
When we reside or make repairs we have been using Cabot or Sherwin Williams soild stain.
Even in the middle of the wall the repairs look just like the painted areas, and not once has it ever peeled.

Just because my opion is differerant then someone elses on how to do something does not make it wrong.

To the O/P go to a real paint store and ask them what they suggest to use on bare Cedar.

Rude, uncalled for, demeaning comments however can get you banned and gives any new members a very bad opion of the whole web site.

Hiya Joe,

I agree with you - there is no place for rude comments on this site. Having said that, your comments regarding stains versus paints are wrong. In this particular example, a homeowner has already decided to PAINT (for any number of legitimate reasons) and has come to this forum for quality advice on proper surface prep and instruction. The decision to PAINT was the right one for many reasons, including matching what's already on the house - and the fact that a paint system is superior, in surface protection, and lifespan. Now, that fact is not an opinion - that is a truth, endorsed by every paint/stain/coating manufacturer in the country, including Sherwin and Cabot (which is Valspar, btw).

Your recommendation to consider 2 coats of Solid Color Stain, versus 1 coat primer and 2 coats of quality acrylic house paint, is a compromise system that not only won't perform as well for as long, but is also less of an ultimate value to the homeowner on a cost-per-square-foot-per-year basis...

...and here's where I'm probably gonna pi$$ off even more industry peeps, but while I almost always recommend one "go to their local independent paint dealer for his/her recommendation," if their recommendation is different than what I've described above, I'd say this independent dealer also does not "really have a complete understanding of paints, stains, and the actual differences between..." and maybe it's time to find a more educated source for your paint needs.

Gary in WA 06-20-2012 12:39 AM

May I remind those members now missing posts in this thread: "Users shall treat each other with respect at all times on DIYChatroom.com. Name calling, personal attacks, or other inappropriate behavior will not be allowed and may cause your account to be banned." from our forum rules found at the bottom right hand of every page under; "Privacy statement" or "Terms of service".
Gary


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