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-   -   How to mix color (paint) in with drywall mud? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/how-mix-color-paint-drywall-mud-69460/)

Snav 04-20-2010 12:41 PM

How to mix color (paint) in with drywall mud?
 
I've read through several threads that discuss coloring drywall mud with paint - but none touch on my question.

When you mix paint in how much is necessary?
Is there a limit to how much can be mixed in before the mud becomes TOO wet or sloppy?
Oil or Latex? (or neither - I was wondering if tempera powder would be ideal, or even painter's paste - which is heavily tinted with color and thick, you 'water' it down to make it usable)

I imagine that when mixing large quantities of tinted mud the best thing to do is carefully measure the paint and mud to try to get the color the same each time.

PaliBob 04-20-2010 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 431052)
I've read through several threads that discuss coloring drywall mud with paint .......

Neither the paint companies nor the joint compound companies will approve of this.

Some folks have mixed a gallon of Acrylic (Latex water base paint) in with a bucket of joint compound to make a very thin mix for texturing. The result is still so thin that the base drywall color will show through if the base drywall is first not painted with the chosen color.

Instead of adding paint it should be possible to add those little tubes of colorant.
The advantage to this is that you are not significantly tampering with the chemistry of the joint compound.

If it was cheaper or faster all the pro's would be adding paint to the mud.
.

cellophane 04-20-2010 02:31 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Duron makes a product called Hard Kote that is designed to be tinted. I've never used it or seen it used - but such things do exist. I would guess that it also costs quite a bit more than your average bucket of mud.

Chalk (as in sidewalk chalk) might also work.

Matthewt1970 04-21-2010 12:04 AM

You are not going to have the best results mixing paint in with joint compound to avoid having to put multiple coats of paint. That still leaves you with the areas that are not getting joint compund that will still need paint and the joint compund will still need a couple coats of paint.

chrisn 04-21-2010 05:19 AM

What would be the purpose?:confused1:

Snav 04-21-2010 08:26 AM

Yeah - I figured it wouldn't be the best idea or people would do it more or have a product made for the purpose to use.
I did find an article that talked about just putting in latex paint and it made a viscous mud . . . but issues about the balance of the mud comes up and it makes me wonder if it would weaken the material.

So I'll do it like I've been doing it, mud first - paint later.

cellophane 04-21-2010 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 431389)
What would be the purpose?:confused1:

one note i read about it was in a restaurant setting. the tinted mud looked better under the painted wall surface when the wall was hit instead of having a big white gouge. i can't really see it working well without a level 5 finish though...

PaliBob 04-21-2010 03:13 PM

For the uninitiated who may not be familiar with all this talk about textures and levels of finish here are a couple of useful Links.

The first link explains the definition of each of the most common levels.
Level 5 is the top level that requires a thin skim coat of joint compound to be trowel applied over the entire drywall area.

Check p163 for Finishing-Level Definitions
http://www.usg.com/documents/constru...k/chapter5.pdf

The 2nd Link has pics of some various Drywall Textures
http://www.drywallschool.com/textures.htm

IMO the best Drywall book is by Myron Ferguson
http://www.amazon.com/Drywall-Profes...1876878&sr=8-1
.

troubleseeker 04-21-2010 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 431389)
What would be the purpose?:confused1:

Drywall finishers doing work for low end spec builders try to eliminate any step they possibly can to make a $, so they often mix cheap white paint or drywall primer instead of water as the thinning agent in their mud before texturing with a hopper gun or applying a roller texture. It doesn't hurt anything, but is not a substitute for a coat of paint, and makes cleaning dried overspray much more difficult.

The only color I ever have seen added is a few guys who add just enough of a pastel tint to their mud to make the spots more visible when doing touchups, so they don't skip any when sanding.

Windows 04-22-2010 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by troubleseeker (Post 431781)
Drywall finishers doing work for low end spec builders try to eliminate any step they possibly can to make a $, so they often mix cheap white paint or drywall primer instead of water as the thinning agent in their mud before texturing with a hopper gun or applying a roller texture. It doesn't hurt anything, but is not a substitute for a coat of paint, and makes cleaning dried overspray much more difficult.

The only color I ever have seen added is a few guys who add just enough of a pastel tint to their mud to make the spots more visible when doing touchups, so they don't skip any when sanding.

Are you sure they are not adding colored chalk? That's what we do.

Snav 04-22-2010 08:31 AM

Interesting. . .colorant chalk.

Well - the purpose in my mind for doing this in my bathroom was to prevent scratches and other damage from being obvious if it happens. I did a heavy texture with a two-tone paint over in the livingroom and damage has happend in a lot of places (kids and pets) and I've had to do a LOT of touchup.

However, it's far less likely that the upper 1/2 of my bathroom wall will sustain the same amount of damage that my livingroom and hallway walls have received.

Further, after putting up the mud (untinted) and texturing then bringing in the tile so I could decide what paint color to use on the walls I realized that the walls are 'busy' enough with the texture and the white mud, so I'll be painting with white paint - no color - nipping this bathroom issue in the bud. (our tiles are a blue/grey - busy pattern - and my husband commented that we cannot darken up the bathroom at ALL because he's tired of feeling like he's a caveman when he's shaving - LOL - so my hopes to have a burgundy bathroom are dashed asunder in more ways than one)

I suppose, since my plan is to smooth-finish the walls in all the bedroom and our kitchen will eventually be a completely different beast altogether - that my issue with textured mud is really kind of over, rather sadly.

My husband, however, saw me mulling this over in the last few days and told me to just use the cement-colorant we use for our mortar when doing brickwork and instead of texturing with mud - texture with mastic. (not cement/concrete or mortar) . . . to which I laughed, but then though *hmm, he might be onto something*

But I won't be playing around with it in the future :)

cellophane 04-22-2010 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 431924)
Well - the purpose in my mind for doing this in my bathroom was to prevent scratches and other damage from being obvious if it happens. I did a heavy texture with a two-tone paint over in the livingroom and damage has happend in a lot of places (kids and pets) and I've had to do a LOT of touchup.

It's not the cheapest stuff ever, but you could put a layer of Acrovyn along the bottom half of your wall. Its standard in hospitals and schools to prevent or at least slow down needing to replace drywall. If your walls really take a beating, a layer of 3/4" plywood under the Acrovyn will take just about anything your kids could throw at it. You could probably even use a wood or plastic laminate.

Snav 04-22-2010 08:47 AM

Nice idea!

Yes, a bit expensive - but that doesn't mean it's not smart and worth looking into :) I imagine that selling this house (which will ultimately happen one day when we're relocated) will be easier if some of these issues are a bit solved.

cellophane 04-22-2010 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snav (Post 431926)
Nice idea!

Yes, a bit expensive - but that doesn't mean it's not smart and worth looking into :) I imagine that selling this house (which will ultimately happen one day when we're relocated) will be easier if some of these issues are a bit solved.

:thumbsup:

you could also go for a more traditional chair rail & wainscotting. would probably cost a bit less than the Acrovyn.

Snav 04-22-2010 11:42 AM

Another good suggestion. I'll explore the possibilities and come to a solution. I never thought of it before but I think that covering the bottom 1/2 or 1/3 would definitely prevent issues and would improve the overall look of the room itself.

*edit -afterthought*
Since doing the work in the livingroom my drywall taping and mud skills have improved significantly. Another option is for me to scrape off the lower 1/2 of texture, put in a chair rail or other decorative divide, and actually smooth-wall the lower portion.

I'll have to think all this over and learn about all possibilities. Thanks for the new direction :)


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