DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Painting (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/)
-   -   How to fix previous owner's poor paint job? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/how-fix-previous-owners-poor-paint-job-41682/)

alt 04-02-2009 08:31 PM

How to fix previous owner's poor paint job?
 
Hi everyone,

I'm pretty new here, so thanks in advance for taking the time to read this :)

We are repainting the bathroom in our 1952 house. There are probably three different paint color layers, most looking like multiple coats. The previous owners did not do a very good job painting. In fact, it's terrible. There are drips everywhere, stray hairs that were painted over, dents that were never patched but just painted over. In several spots it looks like the middle layer of paint peeled off, but rather than smoothing it out they just painted over that too. The worst part is the trim around the doors, floors, and built-in cabinets. The paint is glopped on so thick around the edges that it has become difficult to distinguish where the trim ends and the walls begin.

We patched the dents and tried to skim over some of the peeled-paint spots. Then we sanded the patches, bumps and drips, after which I thought it would be ok. But after priming it still looks awful, and I don't know if I can live with it.

This is my first DIY paint experience and I'm already very discouraged and wonder if we should save some money and hire a professional, or if this is something we can fix ourselves.

What would you recommend? I'd really appreciate any advice you have.

PS, if it makes a difference, the walls are plaster, the original paint is oil which we primed over with Zinsser BIN on advice of a friend since we want to use latex for the new color.

Stillwerkin 04-02-2009 11:57 PM

I don't know the "right/best" way, but here is what I do:

-Knock down the drips and imperfections with 60grit wrapped around wood.
A little more expensive sandpaper will save a lot(!) of time overall. Check that it is garnett and not open-coat.
For big imperfections, you may need to use a hand-held belt sander and a straight edge. Look carefully with this, because they could indicate structural problems which need to be fixed first before anything else.

-Use a box cutter to dig out both sides of built-up paint along the trim line. Change the blades, they are cheaper than a bad back or re-attaching a thumb.

-Recreate the trim/wall line with vinyl spackle using the known-straight surface of the trim. This will take several applications of spackle and drying.

-Use the straight line you previously created to fill in dips on the wall surface, sand the sharp trim edge back in straight, and primer.

I like to use watered-down primer before anything else, so that it soaks into the exposed drywall, and provides a base for everything else.

I also don't sand drywall/spackle unless necessary. That stuff is made of highly toxic fly-ash left over from coal plants.
A few quick wide swipes with a very wet sponge works just as well for knocking off the high spots. Wait and repeat. No sand, no dust, no mess.

Also, always primer when changing colors or when going from dark to light.
Primer is cheaper than paint, and will save two, or three, or four coats of the good stuff trying to cover up everything.

chrisn 04-03-2009 04:40 AM

I don't know the "right/best" way, but here is what I do:

I like to use watered-down primer before anything else, so that it soaks into the exposed drywall, and provides a base for everything else.

if it makes a difference, the walls are plaster,

waynech 04-03-2009 09:45 AM

Can you post any pictures. I think it would help alot of us. Thanks

alt 04-03-2009 12:53 PM

I will try. The camera interface on our computer isn't working so well, but I'll give it a shot when I get home tonight.

Thanks for your detailed answer, stillwerkin. I'll see what I can do this weekend.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:38 AM.