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-   -   How Do I Protect Acrylic Paint on sheetrock From Water Damage? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f4/how-do-i-protect-acrylic-paint-sheetrock-water-damage-170149/)

Rob_D100 01-26-2013 01:45 AM

How Do I Protect Acrylic Paint on sheetrock From Water Damage?
 
I just bought a house where the Vanity in the bathroom is right up against the Acrylic painted wall on the right hand side. The back of the vanity has a backsplash. I can not find a backsplash that matches this vanity. Tile would not look right because all the walls are painted. I was wondering is there any type of polyurithane or laquer that could go over a small portion of the acrylic paint (instead of a backsplash) to protect the sheetrock from occasional water?

chrisn 01-26-2013 04:11 AM

If it is quality paint, properly applied,it is protection enough, you do not need anything on top of it.

jsheridan 01-26-2013 06:05 AM

Agree with Chrisn Rob.That's pretty standard.

Brushjockey 01-26-2013 06:14 AM

Not if its a flat paint. Need an eggshell to give protection like that-
What is yours?

jsheridan 01-26-2013 06:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brushjockey (Post 1102358)
Not if its a flat paint. Need an eggshell to give protection like that-
What is yours?

Are you being argumentative, trolling?:laughing: Inside joke Rob.

I thought about that, but guess I ASSumed it was some sort of enamel. Anymore though it seems that new construction baths are done in flat. But I think that would be more a problem with steam than some splashing. Anyway, yes, minimum eggshell finish for proper protection.

joecaption 01-26-2013 10:06 AM

Tile over sheetrock is done all the time to form a back splash, with some bull nosed tile as a border if you like the look go for it.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...ures&FORM=IGRE

jeffnc 01-26-2013 10:38 AM

The "type" of paint you use is a paint with sheen. Eggshell minimum.

Rob_D100 01-27-2013 12:18 AM

reply
 
I want to thank everyone who replied to my post. If the paint that was used is a Matte finish, do you think I should just paint the back splash area in a different finish like eggshell or a semi-gloss?

joecaption 01-27-2013 12:22 AM

Going to look strange with differant sheens on differant areas in the same room.
Bathrooms never should have been with flat paint in the first place if that's what it turns out to be.

Rob_D100 01-27-2013 12:24 AM

Reply
 
Maybe I should just repaint the bathroom. What sheen do you recommend?

cdaniels 01-27-2013 12:28 AM

I like eggshell in bathrooms.Holds up well to moisture but not glossy enough to look tacky.Just my opinion.Most will recommend a semi-gloss in a bath.

jsheridan 01-27-2013 04:15 AM

Rob, relax, we might just be creating a problem here where none exists. Is this a brand new house, or existing? I ask that because I'm sure that whoever lived there before splashed some water on that paint, and if it's not failing now it probably won't going forward. As I said earlier, the trend is using flat paint in new construction baths, and I've worked in some houses lived in for years under those conditions and no problems. Steam is a bigger problem for flat paint than water. I have a non-bath paint matte finish in my bath and I take hot, steamy showers and no problems. You'll be fine with a matte finish for a little splashing water.

chrisn 01-27-2013 04:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1102903)
Going to look strange with differant sheens on differant areas in the same room.
Bathrooms never should have been with flat paint in the first place if that's what it turns out to be.


He said it was matte not flat.
Matte is fine for a bath

ccarlisle 01-27-2013 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisn (Post 1102923)
He said it was matte not flat.
Matte is fine for a bath

?

You mean there's a difference between a 'flat' sheen and a 'matte' sheen? I see people refer to these sheens as either 'matte' or 'flat' - but never have I seen a specification for one and the other...

Brushjockey 01-27-2013 10:48 AM

Actually depends on whose matte and which one- for instance BM's regal matte is really a very low eggshell- the flat is , well, flatter, and a ceiling flat should be dead flat. Scrub and dirt/ moisture resistance lessens as it becomes more porous ( flatter )


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