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Old 10-29-2011, 05:10 PM   #16
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


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I thought everybody had one of those
I used to, loaned it to my neighbor

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Old 10-29-2011, 07:10 PM   #17
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Believe it or not, I have 2 or 3 of them.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:55 AM   #18
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Believe it or not, I have 2 or 3 of them.
Oh, I believe you do, me, I never heard of it.
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Old 10-30-2011, 07:33 AM   #19
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


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All of the points mentioned above are very good. Paint can lables are normally pretty generic forms of information, better directions can be found on the product data sheets for the paint that you are using. Applying paint outside of its range of conditions can create problems that can be diffcult to correct. Ethylene glycol will sit on the surface of the paint in cold conditions as it cures and will appear as if you sprayed antifreeze over the finish. The temporary heated spray booth is a good way to bring the paint, surface and ambient temps to acceptable levels and reduce the chance off contaminates from getting into the wet film as the paint cures at a slower rate. Dew point temp is also a problem in colder enviroments. I'm going to guess that you dont have a sling psychrometer to measure dew point and relative humidity. You can measure your dew point temp with a metal can, thermometer and ice water (salt can be added to the water in cooler weather to help lower the water temp below the ambient temp). Fill your can with water and add ice while stirring it with your thermometer to keep the can and water temp the same. As soon as you see condensation form on the can, record the temp and that will be your dew point temp. the surface temp of what you are painting should be at least 5 degrees above your dew point temp. Applying paint below the dew point will allow moisture to condense on the surface and ruin your paint job and every thing down hill from it as the paint washes away.
Or you can check the weather forcast

But a good point about the dew. All you need is to have dew form on the paint before it has sufficently dried and you will have the igredients of the paint start to leech out and wreck your paint job.
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Old 11-01-2011, 12:26 PM   #20
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


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Ethylene glycol will sit on the surface of the paint in cold conditions as it cures and will appear as if you sprayed antifreeze over the finish. I'm going to guess that you dont have a sling psychrometer to measure dew point and relative humidity.
Wow Mike, you've probably forgot more about paint than I'll ever know. I was really hoping for an easy "insider trick" like - "put some peanut butter in the paint and it's good down to -10 degrees" , but I guess there are no shortcuts.

I'm hoping we get up to 55 degrees at least one more weekend this year. Otherwise it's space heaters or wait until Spring time .

Ok, I'll risk asking an admittedly dumb question here, is there any danger of explosion being in an enclosed space, with an ignition source (space heater) and aerosolized paint? Yes, I know latex paint is nonflammable, but some "nonflammable" things can explode when aerosolized.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_explosion

Thanks to all for your input
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Old 11-01-2011, 12:46 PM   #21
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


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Wow Mike, you've probably forgot more about paint than I'll ever know. I was really hoping for an easy "insider trick" like - "put some peanut butter in the paint and it's good down to -10 degrees" , but I guess there are no shortcuts.

I'm hoping we get up to 55 degrees at least one more weekend this year. Otherwise it's space heaters or wait until Spring time .

Ok, I'll risk asking an admittedly dumb question here, is there any danger of explosion being in an enclosed space, with an ignition source (space heater) and aerosolized paint? Yes, I know latex paint is nonflammable, but some "nonflammable" things can explode when aerosolized.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_explosion

Thanks to all for your input
How are they "aerosolized"? I don't believe I've ever seen a latex paint in a rattle can. Mostly depends on the propellant which should be listed on the can. Some, a lot, list propane.. some list several different formulations of propane. In any case a fire/explosion cautions should be on the label somewhere. If you are spraying latex with an airless or HVLP with no flammible components added, you could probably put a fire out with it.
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Old 11-01-2011, 12:59 PM   #22
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Maybe I used the wrong term. Partical-ized? I didn't mean a propellant. Anyway, look at the link. Stuff like baking flour or grain can explode if a lot of it is airborne in small particles. And the last time I spray painted the room was foggy with paint particles.
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Old 11-01-2011, 02:41 PM   #23
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


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Maybe I used the wrong term. Partical-ized? I didn't mean a propellant. Anyway, look at the link. Stuff like baking flour or grain can explode if a lot of it is airborne in small particles. And the last time I spray painted the room was foggy with paint particles.
HI Fudge - I think the term you're lookin for is atomized. You needn't be worried about about atomized latex paint as the volume is mostly water. Same stuff firefighters use in their foggers. Grain dust is dangerous because the grain, and dust is maintained at the lowest possible moisture level to prevent molding hence the dust is extremely dry. Even in high school physics when demonstrating grain dust explosions we would generally bake the flour used in the demonstration for 30 40 minutes at about 200*F to ensure it was dry enough for an effective demonstration. Problem with news coverage today is to much flair and not enough fact

Atomized oil base products are inherently dangerous as the material being atomized is highly flammible which puts the fuel/oxygen ratio in the danger zone. Matchs and cigarettes can actually be extinquished in gasoline if you can penetrate the vapor barrier above the liquid before getting 3rd degree burns. At one time my father actually welded leaks in full gas tanks. Something OSHA would likely frown on today.
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Old 11-01-2011, 04:20 PM   #24
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


[quote=jschaben;761608]HI Fudge - I think the term you're lookin for is atomized. You needn't be worried about about atomized latex paint as the volume is mostly water. Same stuff firefighters use in their foggers. Grain dust is dangerous because the grain, and dust is maintained at the lowest possible moisture level to prevent molding hence the dust is extremely dry. Even in high school physics when demonstrating grain dust explosions we would generally bake the flour used in the demonstration for 30 40 minutes at about 200*F to ensure it was dry enough for an effective demonstration. Problem with news coverage today is to much flair and not enough fact

Atomized oil base products are inherently dangerous as the material being atomized is highly flammible which puts the fuel/oxygen ratio in the danger zone. Matchs and cigarettes can actually be extinquished in gasoline if you can penetrate the vapor barrier above the liquid before getting 3rd degree burns. At one time my father actually welded leaks in full gas tanks. Something OSHA would likely frown on today.[/quote]
I sure would'nt have been close enough to watch.
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Old 11-01-2011, 07:17 PM   #25
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[quote=chrisn;761663]
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HI Fudge - I think the term you're lookin for is atomized. You needn't be worried about about atomized latex paint as the volume is mostly water. Same stuff firefighters use in their foggers. Grain dust is dangerous because the grain, and dust is maintained at the lowest possible moisture level to prevent molding hence the dust is extremely dry. Even in high school physics when demonstrating grain dust explosions we would generally bake the flour used in the demonstration for 30 40 minutes at about 200*F to ensure it was dry enough for an effective demonstration. Problem with news coverage today is to much flair and not enough fact

Atomized oil base products are inherently dangerous as the material being atomized is highly flammible which puts the fuel/oxygen ratio in the danger zone. Matchs and cigarettes can actually be extinquished in gasoline if you can penetrate the vapor barrier above the liquid before getting 3rd degree burns. At one time my father actually welded leaks in full gas tanks. Something OSHA would likely frown on today.[/quote]
I sure would'nt have been close enough to watch.
That was decidedly the more popular reaction
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:31 PM   #26
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


Well, we hit 55 degrees last weekend and I gave it a shot. Put two coats on the radiator covers and some door casing. No drips, runs, spots or bursting into flames. I used a plastic dropcloth to form a 2-sided "wall", and a small space heater until they cured enough to take back into the house because the sun was setting and it was getting chilly again. Thanks everybody
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:51 AM   #27
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How cold can I spray latex paint?


Guess you're done. Someone mentioned Resilience, which is exterior paint rated down to 35 degree application. I was assuming that referred to drying/curing, but my worry would be how the paint would flow through a sprayer at that temperature. The spec sheet for Resilience allows for sprayer application at 2000 psi and .015 - .019 tip size with no other mention, so the implication is that it's formulated to flow fine through a sprayer at those temperatures.
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Old 11-11-2011, 11:04 AM   #28
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2000psi Holy Smoke! I could get peanut butter to flow thru a sprayer at that pressure! I'm guessing that stuff is for industrial applications? My paint gun runs at 40-60 psi.

I was wondering if there was an additive one could add to the paint to make it flow better at lower temps, but nobody mentioned that so I figured there was no such thing.
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Old 11-11-2011, 12:39 PM   #29
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Floetrol claims it does, but I've never tried it for low temps.
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Old 11-11-2011, 03:50 PM   #30
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2000psi Holy Smoke! I could get peanut butter to flow thru a sprayer at that pressure! I'm guessing that stuff is for industrial applications? My paint gun runs at 40-60 psi.

I was wondering if there was an additive one could add to the paint to make it flow better at lower temps, but nobody mentioned that so I figured there was no such thing.
2-3,000 psi is the norm for airless sprayers. Mine runs 2800.

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